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  1. I recently installed a TV in our waiting room. I would like the TV to display content other than the usual afternoon garbage like soaps and talk shows. I was hoping to control and plan the programming on the TV to show things like science or medicine content. This can include podcasts or programming ripped from DVD's ( ie. planet earth or other science and nature content).

    The only way that I can come up with to do this easily would be to use an AppleTV and then use podcasts and ripped DVD's to create a video playlist.

    I need about 8 hours of material and I would like to change it weekly or monthly. The alternative would be to fork over another $16/mth to the cable company and just put the Discovery channel on but not everything on that channel is appropriate for the waiting room.

    My main concern is that it may take a lot of time programming the material.

    And just to preempt the comments.. yes I am aware people dont pay much attention to the TV in waiting rooms but put that aside for now

    Would appreciate any suggestions. Thanks in advance.
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  2. You're asking for a lawsuit if you don't get permission to do this from the copyright holders.
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  3. Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    You're asking for a lawsuit if you don't get permission to do this from the copyright holders.
    This is a tiny office. Do I really need to get permission just to play videos in the waiting room? How is that different from an appliance store that plays a DVD on the televisions on display? Do I also need permission if I just play a TV station? We have played music in the waiting rom for years, both local radio stations and recorded music. Was that a violation of the law too? I am not familiar with the law so I'm looking for some advice if anyone really is knowledgeable about the subject. Where does the law draw the line about what is OK to do and what is not?
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  4. Member
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    A lot of medical clinics subscribe to this service:

    http://www.accenthealthmedia.com/waiting_room_network.shtml
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  5. Thanks but I'm really trying to avoid network media produced medical content. I can't be out in the waiting room auditing everything that comes on and mass media produced medical shows are often filled with inaccurate or outdated information and sensationalized stories. These services provide content authored by CNN and Dr. Gupta which is only slightly better than the stuff I'm trying to avoid ( ie. Dr Oz).

    The reason I want more control over what plays in the waiting room is that I want to present stuff that is educational and accurate rather than the dumbed down misinformation most media outlets provide.
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  6. A little google searching turned up:

    This is for the UK but I believe the situation is the same in the USA:
    http://firstpracticemanagement.co.uk/index.php/knowledge_base/general_information/musi..._waiting_room/

    Live TV and Radio in a medical establishment in the USA may be exempt:
    http://www.celaw.com/files/Legal%20Lines%20Jan%2013%202009.pdf

    another:
    http://www2.citypaper.com/news/story.asp?id=15510
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  7. It seems to get pretty confusing . Some of the links indicate that the size of the place is a factor and we fall within those guidelines in that we would be too small to require a license. Some say that if the original broadcaster has a license then the right to rebroadcast within your facility is covered under that license. It seems to me that if we are simply showing a broadcast that is publicly available we are widening their audience and that would be beneficial to everyone wouldn't it? If I just set up a series of free video podcasts and create a playlist I'm giving the creators a wider audience and its material that is out there free for anyone to view anyway. Its not clear to me if thats a copyright infringement. It sounds like the size of the audience is a factor too but they don't give any exact numbers. There are usually no more than 2-3 people in the waiting room at a time, but its unclear if that's to many or not.
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    Which objection of yours is greater -- this:

    Originally Posted by macgyver58 View Post
    My main concern is that it may take a lot of time programming the material.
    Or this:

    Originally Posted by macgyver58 View Post
    Thanks but I'm really trying to avoid network media produced medical content.
    ?

    I don't know how you can be helped. Your choices are either to subscribe to a service that is less than ideal but makes everything easier and cost-effective, or provide the exact kind of programming you'd like--albeit at greater expense and labor.

    Nothing is perfect in this world. You have to choose what works best for you.
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  9. I realize no solution is perfect. I'm just weighing my options. When push comes to shove the accuracy of the content is very important to me so if I have to spend a little time setting up content that us acceptable I would do that. The quality of content produce by most media outlets is really very poor. I spend a good portion of my days correcting a lot of the misinformation put out by the likes of CBS, NBC, ABC, FOX and CNN. The last thing iI want to do is have it playing in our waiting room. I just want to figure out the most efficient and legal way to provide an educational experience out there.
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    You might be able to pick and choose programming from this source:

    http://www.thewellnesschannel.us/

    I do not know what quality it is. Some local DTV stations carry the Wellness Channel on a subchannel. Depending on your location, you may find something free.
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    Originally Posted by macgyver58 View Post
    It seems to get pretty confusing . Some of the links indicate that the size of the place is a factor and we fall within those guidelines in that we would be too small to require a license. Some say that if the original broadcaster has a license then the right to rebroadcast within your facility is covered under that license. It seems to me that if we are simply showing a broadcast that is publicly available we are widening their audience and that would be beneficial to everyone wouldn't it? If I just set up a series of free video podcasts and create a playlist I'm giving the creators a wider audience and its material that is out there free for anyone to view anyway. Its not clear to me if thats a copyright infringement. It sounds like the size of the audience is a factor too but they don't give any exact numbers. There are usually no more than 2-3 people in the waiting room at a time, but its unclear if that's to many or not.
    I looked at the FAQs at the ASCAP website and the MPAA website.

    Stores selling electronics probably have permission from the copyright holder allowing them to demo CDs and DVDs that they also sell. However, playing a home-made recording, commercial CD or commercial DVD in your waiting room is clearly a violation of copyright laws, unless you have permission from the copyright holder.

    Playing a live radio or television broadcast is probably OK. Copyright laws were ammended in 1999 to allow most small businesses and restaurants to have a radio playing over their speaker system, or up to 4 televisions (55 inches or less), one per room for live broadcasts, as long as patrons are not charged a fee for the performance, and the signal is not re-transmitted from the establishment receiving them.

    My advice is don't try to control what your patients watch. If they realize what you are doing they will probably resent it.
    Last edited by usually_quiet; 2nd Apr 2012 at 10:51.
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  12. Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    Originally Posted by macgyver58 View Post
    It seems to get pretty confusing . Some of the links indicate that the size of the place is a factor and we fall within those guidelines in that we would be too small to require a license. Some say that if the original broadcaster has a license then the right to rebroadcast within your facility is covered under that license. It seems to me that if we are simply showing a broadcast that is publicly available we are widening their audience and that would be beneficial to everyone wouldn't it? If I just set up a series of free video podcasts and create a playlist I'm giving the creators a wider audience and its material that is out there free for anyone to view anyway. Its not clear to me if thats a copyright infringement. It sounds like the size of the audience is a factor too but they don't give any exact numbers. There are usually no more than 2-3 people in the waiting room at a time, but its unclear if that's to many or not.
    I looked at the FAQs at the ASCAP website and the MPAA website.

    Stores selling electronics probably have permission from the copyright holder allowing them to demo CDs and DVDs that they also sell. However, playing a home-made recording, commercial CD or commercial DVD in your waiting room is clearly a violation of copyright laws, unless you have permission from the copyright holder.

    Playing a live radio or television broadcast is probably OK. Copyright laws were ammended in 1999 to allow most small businesses and restaurants to have a radio playing over their speaker system, or up to 4 televisions (55 inches or less), one per room for live broadcasts, as long as patrons are not charged a fee for the performance, and the signal is not re-transmitted from the establishment receiving them.

    My advice is don't try to control what your patients watch. If they realize what you are doing they will probably resent it.
    Thanks for the advice. As far as controlling what they watch. They can watch whatever they want at home but in the confines of my office putting something on our own TV gives it some degree of credibility. There is far too much medical advice given out these days by people who shouldn't be giving it out. Networks are concerned with ratings not accuracy. They prefer sensationalism over useful information. I don't want shows with doctors promoting questionable treatments in my waiting room. I don't think patients will actually resent or even notice that we never show Dr. Oz or other questionable programs. Whenever you are sitting in a waiting room the programming is always being chosen for you by someone else. I am just trying to use a more rationale approach when it comes choosing the programming.
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  13. Originally Posted by macgyver58 View Post
    in the confines of my office putting something on our own TV gives it some degree of credibility. There is far too much medical advice given out these days by people who shouldn't be giving it out. Networks are concerned with ratings not accuracy. They prefer sensationalism over useful information. I don't want shows with doctors promoting questionable treatments in my waiting room.
    Hooray, someone with some sense!
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    Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    Originally Posted by macgyver58 View Post
    in the confines of my office putting something on our own TV gives it some degree of credibility. There is far too much medical advice given out these days by people who shouldn't be giving it out. Networks are concerned with ratings not accuracy. They prefer sensationalism over useful information. I don't want shows with doctors promoting questionable treatments in my waiting room.
    Hooray, someone with some sense!
    Not in my book.

    Physicians disagree among themselves as to what constitutes valid information. If this individual thinks that he is putting a stamp of approval on anything people might view, read, or hear while in his waiting room by virtue of it being in his waiting room, then he should film himself presenting the material he wants his patients to have and play that. There will be no copyright problems then, nor will there be any chance that someone else will present information that disagrees with his professional opinion.
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  15. Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    Not in my book.

    Physicians disagree among themselves as to what constitutes valid information. If this individual thinks that he is putting a stamp of approval on anything people might view, read, or hear while in his waiting room by virtue of it being in his waiting room, then he should film himself presenting the material he wants his patients to have and play that. There will be no copyright problems then, nor will there be any chance that someone else will present information that disagrees with his professional opinion.
    There really isn't a lot of disagreement within the medical/scientific community about most subjects. The problem comes in when you have media conglomerates promoting what they think the public wants to hear instead of sticking to the things that are supported by solid scientific evidence. You have people like Dr. Oz promoting all sorts of herbal remedies and alternative medicine nonsense that has little or no science behind it. You also have news reporters with little or no scientific training misreporting scientific findings and in some cases completely misinterpreting the results of an important scientific study.

    I would love to record my own programs and in fact I write a number of educational booklets to help patients understand various medical conditions but as a solo practitioner I don't have the time or resources to produce dozens of hours of quality video content.

    I think I may just leave the weather channel on all day
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    Originally Posted by macgyver58 View Post
    I think I may just leave the weather channel on all day
    This is the first thing you have said that makes any sense to me. Many of your patients are likely elderly folks who watch The Weather Channel all day long.
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  17. Member
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    Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    Originally Posted by macgyver58 View Post
    I think I may just leave the weather channel on all day
    This is the first thing you have said that makes any sense to me. Many of your patients are likely elderly folks who watch The Weather Channel all day long.
    Well, hell -- most cable and satellite providers that run the Weather Channel are also adding this station to their lineups:

    http://www.veria.com/tv

    Supposedly, it's a health and wellness channel. See if there's anything objectionable about that.
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  18. Originally Posted by filmboss80 View Post
    Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    Originally Posted by macgyver58 View Post
    I think I may just leave the weather channel on all day
    This is the first thing you have said that makes any sense to me. Many of your patients are likely elderly folks who watch The Weather Channel all day long.
    Well, hell -- most cable and satellite providers that run the Weather Channel are also adding this station to their lineups:

    http://www.veria.com/tv

    Supposedly, it's a health and wellness channel. See if there's anything objectionable about that.
    Thanks. I really do appreciate the suggestions but as with all channels geared towards "health" information they are trying to atttract viewers and not necessarily interested in providing good science based information so you end up with shows like this one from that channel..

    Spiritual Healing: 3 Doshas, 5 Elements
    Spiritual Healing and Expert Practitioners explain the three Doshas and five Elements. Fundamental concepts to Ayurvedic practice and spiritual healing.


    Unfortunately content providers have to give people what they want. As a physician its my job to give them what they need. The two are sometimes in conflict.
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  19. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    I don't think it would be that hard to find and contact the copyright holders of certain "educational materials" that you may already have in your posession and get official copyright approval (probably with little or NO licensing remuneration, given the small audience/staff size you're talking about). Many if not most content creators or willing (maybe even eager) to allow for such altruistic generosity.

    It's not like you're showing Hollywood movies to draw people in...

    Then you can show a long loop from this short list, adding as you acquire (and get authorization for) more. Use WDTV or similar media device.

    Scott
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  20. Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    I don't think it would be that hard to find and contact the copyright holders of certain "educational materials" that you may already have in your posession and get official copyright approval (probably with little or NO licensing remuneration, given the small audience/staff size you're talking about). Many if not most content creators or willing (maybe even eager) to allow for such altruistic generosity.

    It's not like you're showing Hollywood movies to draw people in...

    Then you can show a long loop from this short list, adding as you acquire (and get authorization for) more. Use WDTV or similar media device.

    Scott
    Thanks. That sounds like a reasonable option. What is WDTV though?
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  21. Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    Interesting. It seems like this is very similar to AppleTV but plays more video formats?
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  22. Originally Posted by macgyver58 View Post
    It seems like this is very similar to AppleTV but plays more video formats?
    Yes. There are many such players.
    http://www.iboum.com/net-media-players.php
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    I have decided I should start watching Dr. Oz. It will be interesting to see how much of the advice presented on the show that isn't currently accepted by most doctors eventually becomes mainstream, and how much is proven wrong.
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    The Samsung BD-D5700 plays one video after another, off of a drive. Those run about $100, and it plays AVI, MKV, MP4, 3GP, etc. I'd hooked one of those up to the TV system.

    Then get all the shows you want, number them in order (for filenames, i.e. 1-ShowName.avi, 2-ShowName.avi), and then let that play all day. I'd queue up 8+ hours at least 4 times, so you have a full month of programming that can be repeated all year long (12 times).

    This thread was asked with the intention of technical and how-to. Not the legal, so I think it's unfortunate that it was sidetracked so quickly. This will take time and some degree of learning what to do.

    Shows like Dr. Oz are less accurate than watching House.
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  25. Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    I have decided I should start watching Dr. Oz. It will be interesting to see how much of the advice presented on the show that isn't currently accepted by most doctors eventually becomes mainstream, and how much is proven wrong.
    That would be akin to checking the accuracy of a fortune teller. They will no doubt get some things right among the large number of things they get wrong but what they get right will be due to total random chance rather than from some special wisdom.
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  26. Originally Posted by lordsmurf View Post
    The Samsung BD-D5700 plays one video after another, off of a drive. Those run about $100, and it plays AVI, MKV, MP4, 3GP, etc. I'd hooked one of those up to the TV system.

    Then get all the shows you want, number them in order (for filenames, i.e. 1-ShowName.avi, 2-ShowName.avi), and then let that play all day. I'd queue up 8+ hours at least 4 times, so you have a full month of programming that can be repeated all year long (12 times).

    This thread was asked with the intention of technical and how-to. Not the legal, so I think it's unfortunate that it was sidetracked so quickly. This will take time and some degree of learning what to do.

    Shows like Dr. Oz are less accurate than watching House.

    Thanks. The technical aspect of all of this did get lost but I appreciate your advice as well as the legal caveats that were brought up.
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    Originally Posted by macgyver58 View Post
    Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    I have decided I should start watching Dr. Oz. It will be interesting to see how much of the advice presented on the show that isn't currently accepted by most doctors eventually becomes mainstream, and how much is proven wrong.
    That would be akin to checking the accuracy of a fortune teller. They will no doubt get some things right among the large number of things they get wrong but what they get right will be due to total random chance rather than from some special wisdom.
    I have caught a few minutes at the end of the show now and then. The advice given pretty much agreed with what my family doctor had to say on the subject of nutrition: Eat fish twice a week, and increase your consumption of whole grains and colorful vegetables.

    I would start looking for a new physician if I had one that loathed answering his patients questions about what they see on TV as much as you say you do. I get very little information from my doctor unless I ask questions....and everybody should be asking more questions and standing up for themselves when it comes to their health. A bad diagnosis by an ignorant former family doctor almost cost me my life because I took his word for what was wrong with me even though I felt it was incorrect.
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  28. Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    Originally Posted by macgyver58 View Post
    Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    I have decided I should start watching Dr. Oz. It will be interesting to see how much of the advice presented on the show that isn't currently accepted by most doctors eventually becomes mainstream, and how much is proven wrong.
    That would be akin to checking the accuracy of a fortune teller. They will no doubt get some things right among the large number of things they get wrong but what they get right will be due to total random chance rather than from some special wisdom.
    I have caught a few minutes at the end of the show now and then. The advice given pretty much agreed with what my family doctor had to say on the subject of nutrition: Eat fish twice a week, and increase your consumption of whole grains and colorful vegetables.

    I would start looking for a new physician if I had one that loathed answering his patients questions about what they see on TV as much as you say you do. I get very little information from my doctor unless I ask questions....and everybody should be asking more questions and standing up for themselves when it comes to their health. A bad diagnosis by an ignorant former family doctor almost cost me my life because I took his word for what was wrong with me even though I felt it was incorrect.
    Quiet you need to be careful about judging people you don't know. I never said I don't like to answer patients questions, in fact I do it all day long happily. What I don't like is when I have to take time away from discussing important subjects in order to undo misinformation that has been given out by doctors or news reporters who don't know what they are talking about.

    Not everything Dr. Oz says is wrong, In fact thats what is so dangerous about him. A lot of what he discusses is at least partly factual but he peppers his shows with lots of alternative medicine voodoo nonsense that is not evidence or science based. He is far more interested in promoting his own career than he is in presenting good information to his viewers. Its all about the ratings and if you want good ratings you have to give the public what they want whether its accurate or not. It seems that afternoon TV audiences want to believe that every medical problem can be prevented or cured with some "super food" or large amounts of antioxidants, or that nearly every cancer can be detected early if you just listen to your body. There is a grain of truth to both of these comments but the hype he uses to promote this stuff creates unrealistic and inaccurate expectations. I could go on and on but this really isnt the purpose of this thread so lets just leave it at that.
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  29. Member edDV's Avatar
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    If you want to program your own display, Google LG EZSign. You use a PC to program a USB drive that loops a multimedia program stream to the LG display.
    Recommends: Kiva.org - Loans that change lives.
    http://www.kiva.org/about
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