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  1. Member
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    I am looking for scrap video snippets. Material which has been discarded from edits. Footage wich bears zero copyrights or footage from which the copyrights/ licenses have expired. I tried numerous sites but they all seem to charge you for clips. Even when they say "free".

    My terms for gathering footage to use in a commercial, public way, such as tv broadcastings, internet publications on YouTube or other videostreaming sites are:

    - Zero fees as in no charge for downloading the footage.

    - Licensing at zero fees.

    - Footage should be of good quality no matter the aspect ratio.

    - Materials should be of such a professional quality that they're usable for commercial purposes. (music video)


    Most Stock footage is useless because it's often too static (not much too see).
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  2. Banned
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    It's older video and it may not be exactly what you have in mind, but archive.org has old videos that are in the public domain in the USA. There is no charge to download their videos and no restrictions on them.
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    THank you for the reply...

    I have scoured the site you mentioned and it has good quality materials. I found the site a year back or so and I was able to dowload some good usable footage to take snippets from... but apart from that I'm looking for other sources to obtain footage from. As long as they don't charge for materials to download. Pond5 seems free but it's really not. They have good quailty footage shot by pro's but they charge for the footage or download.

    Has anyone any knowlegde about copyrights on an international basis? How long does copyright apply to certain materials? 50 years? 75, 100?
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  4. Banned
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    Originally Posted by Lupus0001 View Post
    Has anyone any knowlegde about copyrights on an international basis? How long does copyright apply to certain materials? 50 years? 75, 100?
    Unfortunately it's wildly inconsistent, even among developed western nations. Music generally is in the public domain 50 years after its initial release or performance in most of the world EXCEPT the USA (where the copyright period apparently is bordering on infinity based on an unchallenged court ruling in Capitol Records vs. Nexus roughly a decade ago). Films are harder to say with 70 years essentially being the term of copyright in most of the world, except the USA again where it is something like "death of the author plus 70 years".
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  5. Current state of Copyright in the USA:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copyright_Term_Extension_Act

    Sound recordings are a separate issue. No sound recording ever made in the USA will be free of Copyright until 2067 (unless explicitly release to the public domain by the Copyright holder):
    http://www.pdinfo.com/record.php

    You can rest assured that nothing created after Mickey Mouse will ever enter the public domain. Disney will pay whatever it takes to prevent that.
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    Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    Current state of Copyright in the USA:

    ....

    You can rest assured that nothing created after Mickey Mouse will ever enter the public domain. Disney will pay whatever it takes to prevent that.
    LOL I'm not looking for Disney materials... they're too sweet for the project I'm working on (music vid, with my own track).
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  7. Originally Posted by Lupus0001 View Post
    Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    Current state of Copyright in the USA:

    ....

    You can rest assured that nothing created after Mickey Mouse will ever enter the public domain. Disney will pay whatever it takes to prevent that.
    LOL I'm not looking for Disney materials...
    If Disney has the laws amended to keep Mickey from entering the public domain -- nothing else will enter the public domain either.
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  8. Member
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    [/QUOTE]
    If Disney has the laws amended to keep Mickey from entering the public domain -- nothing else will enter the public domain either.[/QUOTE]

    I assume this a reference to the way United States politicians have passed the laws that make it legal to bribe them - PAC's etc?
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  9. Banned
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    I assume this a reference to the way United States politicians have passed the laws that make it legal to bribe them - PAC's etc?
    It's actually more complicated than that. US politicians also passed a law to restrict this and the US Supreme Court ruled it unconstitutional. Basically a slim majority of the court tends to look at issues as "Is this legal/constitutional? Yes or no." without regards to the consequences of such decisions. And there have been some rumblings behind closed doors that in hindsight this particular decision has not worked out as expected.

    Also, the majority of US politicians are lawyers and lawyers love copyright and by nature most are very sympathetic to copyright holders. For example, my best friend from college is a lawyer and his specialty has absolutely nothing to do with copyright law in any way. Yet when I have talked to him about this subject he seemed genuinely puzzled as to why it was considered a bad thing for anything to stay under permanent copyright, if such existed. So you don't necessarily have to bribe politicians (ie. lawyers) in the US to get on board with this. The late Sonny Bono, a songwriter, singer and TV personality prior to being a Congressman, had no problems getting the most recent copyright extensions passed in a law that bears his name. He didn't have to twist anybody's arm to get it passed.
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  10. We now have a government of the corporations, by the corporations, for the corporations. The people are just a minor inconvenience.
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  11. DECEASED
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    Originally Posted by jman98 View Post
    ...

    Also, the majority of US politicians are lawyers and lawyers love copyright and by nature most are very sympathetic to copyright holders. For example, my best friend from college is a lawyer and his specialty has absolutely nothing to do with copyright law in any way. Yet when I have talked to him about this subject he seemed genuinely puzzled as to why it was considered a bad thing for anything to stay under permanent copyright, if such existed.
    "Eternal copyrights" are the same as: I work during one day, and as a due reward I receive a nice monthly income during the next ten years.
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  12. Originally Posted by El Heggunte View Post
    "Eternal copyrights" are the same as: I work during one day, and as a due reward I receive a nice monthly income during the next ten years.
    No, more like the rest of your life. Then whomever you will your copyrights to after you die. Ad infinitum.
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  13. Member dragonkeeper's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    We now have a government of the corporations, by the corporations, for the corporations. The people are just a minor inconvenience.
    I've been saying the exact same thing for years, but people refuse to see it for what it was. Now with DRM become the mantra of companies Microsoft and iTunes many are seeing the light. It came to a head for me when mabell pretty much blocked the expansion of internet phone calls in the mid 90's.

    Good luck in your search I gave up on such an endeavor a while back. I know shoot my own video construction sites, airports, bus terminals, train yards all types of places. Renting a prosumer camera for 24 hrs was a lot better than scouring sites for hours in hopes of finding something useful, and then finding out it was not actually free to download.
    Murphy's law taught me everything I know.
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  14. Member
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    'Kay.... Um... Guess my project is doomed then... Unless I'd be able to raise me some serious money...

    Thanks for the help.
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    Originally Posted by Lupus0001 View Post
    'Kay.... Um... Guess my project is doomed then... Unless I'd be able to raise me some serious money...

    Thanks for the help.
    1) Use archive.org. You already said "it has good quality materials". What's your problem with it?
    2) We do not know what Dutch law is, but in the USA you MIGHT be able to use VERY short excerpts under the nebulous doctrine of "fair use". There are no standards for what is and is not "fair use" in the USA. And if a copyright holder decides that what you did violates "fair use" they can always sue you and make a court decide. Anything can happen in a court case. In the infamous Capitol Records vs. Naxos case I mentioned earlier (NOT a "fair use" case by the way) the court literally made up the law they used in the case out of thin air. The verdict was probably correct, but the legal justification for it was a joke, with the court ruling that "common law" copyrights (this is the "invented out of thin air" part) basically NEVER expired, even though the US Constitution clearly states that such is impossible. But Naxos screwed up by trying to sneak a clear copyright violation into the US thinking that the rights holder wouldn't notice and they chose to cut their losses rather than appeal (they had no grounds to win, but they could have at least gotten the "common law copyrights never expired" bs off the books), so a very bad and incorrect court ruling established a standard for the USA.

    You think YOU have to raise serious money? You have no idea. Music publishers often ask for $100,000 and up for EACH song in a film, even when just a tiny fraction is used and the film is a documentary with no chance of even making $100,000. The American TV show "Malcolm And The Middle" only has the 1st season available on home video because the producers failed to license the songs used in the show for home video releases and the publishers want too much money to make further releases viable. Some old American shows like "WKRP In Cincinnati" and "Quantum Leap" have actually found it much cheaper to completely redo the original soundtracks by commissioning new music to replace the original music on the show. Unfortunately in those cases the original music (popular songs by various performers) was critical to the episodes and such replacement has been condemned by the fans, but music business refuses to get realistic about licensing fees. The same probably applies to the film industry as well.
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