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  1. I have a 2 year old 19" wide screen AOC monitor and decided spur of the moment a few weeks ago to buy an Acer 22" monitor that looked really nice in the store.
    I finally hooked it up last night. For my needs and eyes the monitor is very good, but I am surprised that it is the same screen height as the one it is replacing and is simply 3" wider.
    I know 19" to 22" isn't that great a difference, and it's my own ignorance here, but I really thought it would be a bit bigger in all directions and not just side to side.

    So, next time I am impulsive, what size monitor starts to become larger over all, and not just wider?
    Or, like many things today, is there no longer a standard for this?

    --dES
    "You can observe a lot by watching." - Yogi Bera
    http://www.areturningadultstudent.com
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  2. Renegade gll99's Avatar
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    Is the 19" a 16:10 ie... (1920x1200) format and the 22" a 16:9 (1920x1080)?

    When I bought my 24" monitors I specifically chose the 16:10 format because they are a bit higher.
    There's not much to do but then I can't do much anyway.
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  3. The new one is 1920x1080, the previous one was 1440 x 900.
    I still get more screen real estate, which I like, but was also hoping everything would be bigger AND more screen real estate.

    --dES
    "You can observe a lot by watching." - Yogi Bera
    http://www.areturningadultstudent.com
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  4. Originally Posted by Des View Post
    was also hoping everything would be bigger
    Then you need to look at dot pitch, not screen size.
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  5. Originally Posted by Des View Post
    The new one is 1920x1080, the previous one was 1440 x 900.
    I still get more screen real estate, which I like, but was also hoping everything would be bigger AND more screen real estate.

    --dES
    Interesting. I thought dot pitch had to do with how well details appear on the screen? How would this effect image size?
    I'm thinking: bigger TV screen= bigger picture, is this not really the case then?

    --dES
    "You can observe a lot by watching." - Yogi Bera
    http://www.areturningadultstudent.com
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  6. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
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    the new one is widescreen 16/9 the old one was not, it was in between 4:3 and 16/9.
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    "a lot of people are better dead" - prisoner KSC2-303
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  7. Originally Posted by Des View Post
    I thought dot pitch had to do with how well details appear on the screen?
    Yes.

    Originally Posted by Des View Post
    How would this effect image size?
    width = horizontal dot pitch * horizontal resolution
    height = vertical dot pitch * vertical resolution

    Originally Posted by Des View Post
    I'm thinking: bigger TV screen= bigger picture, is this not really the case then?
    If the resolution is the same.
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  8. Thanks Jagabo, that makes sense, especially when I tie it into the information Aedipuss about the old screen vs new screen aspect ratio.

    --dES
    "You can observe a lot by watching." - Yogi Bera
    http://www.areturningadultstudent.com
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  9. Member edDV's Avatar
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    Screen size is measured diagonally.

    Click image for larger version

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    Notice the height is approximately the same.

    For this one, notice the diagonal is the same.

    Click image for larger version

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  10. Member
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    16/10 models were popular a few years ago, I've got one myself - 1680*1050.
    For the same width, compared with a 16/9 LCD mine is taller.
    Last edited by davexnet; 27th Dec 2011 at 12:35.
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  11. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
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    16:10 is still the default for new pro monitors. Prior to that, it was 5:4.
    I only have 16:9 because the low-cost IPS panels from ViewSonic come in that size and not 16:10.
    I'd prefer 16:10.

    Older non-pro monitors were also 16:10, but now mostly 16:9.
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  12. Renegade gll99's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Des View Post
    The new one is 1920x1080, the previous one was 1440 x 900.
    I still get more screen real estate, which I like, but was also hoping everything would be bigger AND more screen real estate.

    --dES
    Regardless of screen resolution your old one has a 16:10 aspect ratio the width is 1.6 times the height (1440 / 900) which is the same width to height ratio (not size) as my 24" (1920 / 1200 = 1.6) and the new one is 16:9 where the width is 1.7777 times the height (1920 / 1080). That's why the difference in height is not as much as you expected.
    There's not much to do but then I can't do much anyway.
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  13. If you want a bigger monitor, sit closer to the one you have.
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  14. Interesting how these things have changed. I guess when all we had were 4:3 ratios it was simple, guess I have to stop being so simple now 8)

    <q>Handguy: If you want a bigger monitor, sit closer to the one you have.</q>
    Funny you should say that, I moved the monitor 2 inches closer this morning

    --dES
    "You can observe a lot by watching." - Yogi Bera
    http://www.areturningadultstudent.com
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