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Poll: What type of light source are you using in your home?

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  1. I'm a Super Moderator johns0's Avatar
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    Jun 2002
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    I've pretty well switched over to Compact Fluorescent Lamps.
    I think,therefore i am a hamster.
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  2. I'm a MEGA Super Moderator Baldrick's Avatar
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    Aug 2000
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    Sweden
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    Compact Fluorescent Lamp and Led.
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  3. Good old Tungsten - got loads of them "in stock"
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  4. Member
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    Aug 2006
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    Mostly compact fluorescent. Night lights and Christmas tree lights are LED. There are still a few decorative incandescent bulbs in use for which I haven't found a suitable replacement.
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  5. Mod Neophyte Super Moderator redwudz's Avatar
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    Sep 2002
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    Halogen on my dimmable lights.(Usually ran at 50%) Yellow 'bug' CFLs for all outdoor lights. And a few LEDs for the fridge and night-lights. Also four 8 ft fluorescents in the garage.

    Everything else is incandescent, but most of them will be replaced as they die with CFLs.
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  6. Member turk690's Avatar
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    Jul 2003
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    ON, Canada
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    I spent a pretty penny replacing virtually every light source in my rented flat with LED when I moved in.
    For the nth time, with the possible exception of certain Intel processors, I don't have/ever owned anything whose name starts with "i".
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  7. Renegade gll99's Avatar
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    May 2002
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    We use cfl in all our external night lights except the brighter motion activated security ones. We also use cfl in all open ceiling fixtures and table lamps. Unfortunately a few often used ceiling fixtures are closed in and they need incandescent because cfl burn out in a matter of a few weeks or less (a lesson we learned pretty quickly). Seems like a high fire risk and we wouldn't do it again. Talk about a smelly black smoke and pollution when a cfl's built-in ballast burns out. We have a couple of led standard socket light fixture bulbs but the wattage and lumen is too low for anything but a slightly brighter night /tv light. Hopefully the price of led will drop to a point where they offer sufficient brightness and be cost effective to replace all lights with that type.
    There's not much to do but then I can't do much anyway.
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  8. Member lacywest's Avatar
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    Only one light in my house is incandescent ... and I need a ladder to reach it ... all the rest are CFL or LEDs
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  9. Member
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    England
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    Originally Posted by mike20021969 View Post
    Good old Tungsten - got loads of them "in stock"
    Snap. Got several large boxes of them

    Don't like the quality of light from CFLs or LED...

    I didn't realise bulbs like these would be available for the foreseeable future. 5x the price of traditional bulbs, but they last twice as long and produce nice light.
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  10. Banned
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    I'm a huge fan of LED lights. I just wish they were cheaper. Some people will simply never be pleased with the newer alternatives but I think that for the most part even people who dislike CFLs will be happy with LED lights.
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  11. I didn't realise bulbs like these would be available for the foreseeable future. 5x the price of traditional bulbs, but they last twice as long and produce nice light.
    Wow! The math of that sure doesn't work for the ol' pocketbook, does it?

    Missing in all the hoopla about CFLs, LEDs, and generally "saving the planet," is what we're supposed to do for lighting where specialty incandescent bulbs are now used: Freezers and ovens. The CFLs and LEDs may work in subfreezing temps, but what about oven temps in the 400 degrees (f) and higher range?
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  12. Incadescent (SP?) Bulbs, with some 4' Flourescents mixed in. Some CFLs where the quality of light they output is outweighed by the headache of getting to them.

    I do use a CFL in a goose neck lamp at work. It came in a package for $5, 4 regular CFL bulbs, Lamp and special base bulb for the lamp. My brother ran across them in the super market and called me and I said yes go for it.

    Originally Posted by gll99 View Post
    We use cfl in all our external night lights except the brighter motion activated security ones. We also use cfl in all open ceiling fixtures and table lamps. Unfortunately a few often used ceiling fixtures are closed in and they need incandescent because cfl burn out in a matter of a few weeks or less (a lesson we learned pretty quickly). Seems like a high fire risk and we wouldn't do it again. Talk about a smelly black smoke and pollution when a cfl's built-in ballast burns out. We have a couple of led standard socket light fixture bulbs but the wattage and lumen is too low for anything but a slightly brighter night /tv light. Hopefully the price of led will drop to a point where they offer sufficient brightness and be cost effective to replace all lights with that type.
    Either you got a bad batch, It does happen. Or you didn't get the right type. It seems that there are some that are not rated for the base to be up. those need the base to be down such as a lamp. For ceiling fixtures where the base is up (Top) you need to be sure to get ones designed for that due to the heat from the bulb rising.

    I have seen some where the ballast went bad and the base got very hot, No Smell or smoke however.

    Now it is like a built-in electronic ballast using cheap electronics in there.
    If I'd known I was going to live this long, I'd have taken better care of myself.
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  13. Member edDV's Avatar
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    Mar 2004
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    I'm 90% CFL now but still have 4 ft florescent tubes in the kitchen ceiling with alternate LED as night light. There is a track light way up 25+ ft that still has halogen bulbs. The tall ladder thing makes me go Alfred Hitch**** Vertigo.

    All my power out temp lights are now LED. Great for battery/generator power. LED is the future for home lighting. Expensive now.
    Recommends: Kiva.org - Loans that change lives.
    http://www.kiva.org/about
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  14. Member
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    Using mostly CFL but should have switched to tungsten for the winter months as they help heat up the house and lower my gas heating bill (current outside temp as I write this is -18C). Also, tungsten is easier to dispose of than fluorescents which have materials that end up in the water table around here. I guess they never figured on that in the great run up to be "green"...
    Last edited by oldfart13; 15th Dec 2011 at 15:25.
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  15. Mostly CFL and halogen, with precisely two Phillips 12.5 watt LEDs, which do a good imitation of a 60 watt incandescent, and do not mind being turned on and off a lot. Highly recommended; got them for $15 each in a local promotion. I bought some 5050 RGB LED strips as an alternative to Christmas - sorry, seasonal festive lights - which will go up tomorrow if my adhesive will work at 5 C. (I have similar warm-white LED strips under our kitchen cabinets, definitely a wife-pleaser.)
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  16. Member olyteddy's Avatar
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    Mostly CFL except where they don't make sense, like the hall closet where you want instant full light for a minute or two and several fixtures that need dimming. When LED prices drop a bit more (and light output goes up) I'll change a few of those out too. We got a couple strings of battery powered LED X-mas lights on our tree (small, live tree...wanted the tiniest wires we could find).
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