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  1. Member p_l's Avatar
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    If my videos are short enough to fit into an AVCHD disc without re-encoding, aside from slightly better compatibility with some ancient Blu-ray standalone players, what advantages would there be to burning an actual Blu-ray disc?
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  2. I'm a Super Moderator johns0's Avatar
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    Only advantage is you can fit 5 x 4.37 avchd movies on a 25gb(23.3gb) blu-ray disc.
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  3. Member yoda313's Avatar
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    Actually the advantage is you can use a much bigger bitrate in the avchd. You don't mention the source of the avchd. If this is for example a m2ts h264 recording from a hauppauge hd pvr you can use a much larger bitrate without needing to account for a dual or single layer dvdr capacity. You would still have to do any necessary conversions to make it fully bluray compatible (I don't know anything about that as I have only worked with avchd - I don't have a bluray burner so that is my next option - I do have a bdrom though).
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  4. I'm a Super Moderator johns0's Avatar
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    You don't need to do any conversions if the avchd is already compliant,just need to reauthor which i did such as putting my season 1 supernatural on blu-ray,they didn't include English subtitles on it so i had to re-encode to mkv with handbrake and use the cc as the main subs which were english.

    I did this on dvd avchd before i got my blu-ray burner.
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  5. Member p_l's Avatar
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    The source is my Sony AVCHD camcorder and it's a compliant 16mb/s 1080i AVCHD file which doesn't need any re-encoding in my authoring programs, so there wouldn't be any advantage to just adding extra bitrate to it, would there?
    Last edited by p_l; 19th Jun 2011 at 20:41.
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  6. I'm a Super Moderator johns0's Avatar
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    Adding extra bitrate doesn't help at after the files are made,only when you set your camera to shoot at a higher bitrate if it allows you to do that.
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  7. Member yoda313's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by johns0 View Post
    Adding extra bitrate doesn't help at after the files are made,only when you set your camera to shoot at a higher bitrate if it allows you to do that.
    Exactly. The advantage of burning to bluray is you can set the bitrate a lot higher next time around. I don't know what the maximum would be for a single layer bd. But you wouldn't have to scrimp on bitrate if you are burning to bluray.
    Donatello - The Shredder? Michelangelo - Maybe all that hardware is for making coleslaw?
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  8. Member p_l's Avatar
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    But I'm already shooting at the camera's maximum HD bitrate and frame size. There would be no point in re-encoding after the fact to a higher bitrate (Blu-ray's max is 40 Mb/s). You can't add quality that's not already there, right?
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  9. I'm a Super Moderator johns0's Avatar
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    Right.
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