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  1. Member lacywest's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    Originally Posted by rickydavao View Post
    Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    Originally Posted by sum_guy View Post
    Software players at this point don't seem to be affected at all
    But they likely will be in the future.
    If, by "Software players", we are referring to, for example, the WD TV and Asus O!Play, then wouldn't they be shooting themselves in the foot if they incorporated the Cinavia protection into their boxes?
    Yes. But they may have no choice. For example, what if it becomes a mandatory part of the AC3 or AAC license?
    Okay something to wonder about ... how many people watch DVD - BR that way.

    And how many people use their PCs to watch them with a BD player.

    Are they going to force Liteon and other companies to incorporate a chip of some sort into their $30 DVD Players and their $70 BD players that will some how ... mute the audio going into the PC mother board or the sound card inside a person's PC Tower ?
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    Those three links are all the same.
    Did you mean to link to specific posts?
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    If computer software players like WinDVD, PowerDVD and Arcsoft TMT are forced to include Cinavia, and I think they will be, many people will simply convert the main movies to mkv or mp4 and watch them using Media Player Classic HomeCinema or VLC. I don't see how Cinavia will be able to stop playback from these two software programs, or others like them.

    If they force the hardware players, like the WD TV media players, to conform and recognize Cinavia infected audio, we may simply see a shift to small HTPC's instead, using VLC or other unencumbered software. I think Cinavia on the media players will eventually kill that type of hardware, and the manufacturers will fight it tooth and nail.
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  4. Member lacywest's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Gavino View Post
    Those three links are all the same.
    Did you mean to link to specific posts?
    I used properties inside each comment and was hoping it would shoot you to that particular comment.

    So ... since there was ... first ... second ... third ... there are 3 comments to read on that page

    Here is the main point mentioned on that page ...

    Good bye, Cinavia. My BD-RE with the DVD's audio track muxed in works fine. No Cinavia. Understand that the *ONLY* difference from my disc that has Cinavia and the one that doesn't is a switch of the audio track. Chapters, subtitles, and the video track are all identical on both discs. So, there, you have a work around for any BD that comes with a DVD, as well.
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    Last edited by lacywest; 29th Jan 2011 at 11:13. Reason: I did not explain well enuff for sombody
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  5. Member lacywest's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Kerry56 View Post
    If computer software players like WinDVD, PowerDVD and Arcsoft TMT are forced to include Cinavia, and I think they will be, many people will simply convert the main movies to mkv or mp4 and watch them using Media Player Classic HomeCinema or VLC. I don't see how Cinavia will be able to stop playback from these two software programs, or others like them.

    If they force the hardware players, like the WD TV media players, to conform and recognize Cinavia infected audio, we may simply see a shift to small HTPC's instead, using VLC or other unencumbered software. I think Cinavia on the media players will eventually kill that type of hardware, and the manufacturers will fight it tooth and nail.
    What you said is fine but ... I do have both ... Media Player Classic HomeCinema or VLC ... on my PC but ... most of the time I try to use Mpcstar ... much easier to FF or FW ... just use the arrow keys and it will move forward or backwards.

    Media Player Classic HomeCinema or VLC ... dont respond with the clicking of the arrow keys on my keyboard.
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  6. Originally Posted by lacywest View Post
    Good bye, Cinavia. My BD-RE with the DVD's audio track muxed in works fine. No Cinavia. Understand that the *ONLY* difference from my disc that has Cinavia and the one that doesn't is a switch of the audio track. Chapters, subtitles, and the video track are all identical on both discs. So, there, you have a work around for any BD that comes with a DVD, as well.
    Cinavia can be applied to the DVD tracks as well. So that may not work in the future.
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  7. Member lacywest's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    Originally Posted by lacywest View Post
    Good bye, Cinavia. My BD-RE with the DVD's audio track muxed in works fine. No Cinavia. Understand that the *ONLY* difference from my disc that has Cinavia and the one that doesn't is a switch of the audio track. Chapters, subtitles, and the video track are all identical on both discs. So, there, you have a work around for any BD that comes with a DVD, as well.
    Cinavia can be applied to the DVD tracks as well. So that may not work in the future.
    Oh yeah ... when that happens ... SlySoft ... will really get busy ... or they will see them themselves going out of business.

    Did you see the article about that young guy that cracked the code on PS3 players ? Sony is definitely not happy !!

    Remember how DVD code got cracked ?? ... it all started when some kid wanted to be able to play DVDs on his Apple computer and at the same time ... we found out how to copy encrypted DVD Vobs to our hard drives.
    Last edited by lacywest; 29th Jan 2011 at 11:40. Reason: forgot a question mark ... :-)
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    Originally Posted by Kerry56 View Post
    If computer software players like WinDVD, PowerDVD and Arcsoft TMT are forced to include Cinavia, and I think they will be, many people will simply convert the main movies to mkv or mp4 and watch them using Media Player Classic HomeCinema or VLC. I don't see how Cinavia will be able to stop playback from these two software programs, or others like them.

    If they force the hardware players, like the WD TV media players, to conform and recognize Cinavia infected audio, we may simply see a shift to small HTPC's instead, using VLC or other unencumbered software. I think Cinavia on the media players will eventually kill that type of hardware, and the manufacturers will fight it tooth and nail.
    Agreed.
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  9. Disgustipated TooLFooL's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by lacywest View Post
    Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    Cinavia can be applied to the DVD tracks as well. So that may not work in the future.
    Oh yeah ... when that happens ... SlySoft ... will really get busy ... or they will see them themselves going out of business.
    Um, it has happened... thats the whole reason i started the thread, read the title....

    "Takers" DVD contains Cinavia protection.
    I am just a worthless liar,
    I am just an imbecil
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  10. Why would Sony and others even engage in all this.
    To increase revenues because they believe every copied title is a lost sale.
    First, I do not believe every copy of something floating around would have been a retail sale otherwise.
    There are plenty of titles I would accept for free and watch once that I would not purchase in a million years.
    So what is a person to do to convince Sony and others there is a bigger price for this move than a benefit?
    Here is what I am doing.
    I no longer permit firmware updates to my blu-ray players until I can confirm they are not being infected with the cinavia code in the process. If that means some titles will not play in the future, I will avoid them, or return them as defective if they are not clearly marked as unplayable and do not play.
    I intend to avoid purchasing titles indicated as cinavia infected.
    And, of course, I have no intentions of purchasing a new player that has cinavia incorporated in it.
    So, if Sony sees no increase in movie title sales and a decrease in hardware sales as a result of spending money incorporating cinavia into their titles and hardware, maybe they will get the message that we want more and better quality titles and players - not offerings that limit the flexibility we value in our purchases. Cinavia does nothing to enhance our viewing pleasure and utility of our purchases. It only harms them. So let's not buy cinavia infected products.
    Yeah - I realize this will never fly 100%. There will surely be cinavia infected titles I'd really like to own and will buy. But there are also plenty of titles I tend to buy that are marginal for purchase. Well, if those "marginal" titles have cinavia - I'm not buying them. They are great candidates for rental only, if I really want o see them once.
    After all, I have shelves full of titles I've only watched once or twice. I probably shouldn't be buying them anyway. Now is a good time to stop - or at least slow down - and send Sony a message in the process.
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    I think the major Hollywood DVD distributors would prefer that their material be shoplifted rather than copied! I am completely astonished how the movie and music industry were able to convince politicians to make a law that would be more punishable for copying a copyrighted disc then if someone were to actually shoplift the copyrighted disc!

    When it comes to hardware, I don't even own a DVD player let alone a Blu-Ray player! I have the WDTV HD Media Player and a bunch of movies ripped onto a server. Hollywood can just pucker up and kiss my south side! We the consumers are king and queen and so Hollywood just needs to come into the NEW digital era!
    Last edited by dvdsham; 19th Feb 2011 at 14:54.
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    Originally Posted by sacflies View Post
    Guys I think this problem is just getting worse. I ripped my copy of The Social Network blu-ray to hard drive using MakeMKV (movie only) and tried to play it thru WD TV version 2 with an older firmware installed. This version of the WD TV is several years old and they don't even update the firmware anymore. Five minutes in the movie stops (audio AND video) and the screen goes black and "Invalid Format" dances across the screen. Now I assume this is not being generated thru the WD TV as it is an older version. Therefore the cinavia detection is being done by my brand new LG LD400 32in HDTV. The "Invalid Format" message is being generated by my TV. This is a new LG model that I believe came out last Fall. So not only do we have the PS3 and various blu-ray players with cinavia detection on them, now apparently TV's are coming out with this as well. We need a fix for this and fast!!
    I had a feeling this Cinavia would show up in TV's. Looks like I'll be sticking to my HD video projector for a long time! I wonder if computer monitors are affected as well? All you need is a video converter module and any computer monitor can be turned into a TV
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  13. Originally Posted by dvdsham View Post
    I had a feeling this Cinavia would show up in TV's. Looks like I'll be sticking to my HD video projector for a long time! I wonder if computer monitors are affected as well? All you need is a video converter module and any computer monitor can be turned into a TV
    A few posts later he said:

    Originally Posted by sacflies View Post
    Forget all the above. It was not the TV. The problem is in my WD TV player.
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    Originally Posted by jagabo View Post
    Originally Posted by dvdsham View Post
    I had a feeling this Cinavia would show up in TV's. Looks like I'll be sticking to my HD video projector for a long time! I wonder if computer monitors are affected as well? All you need is a video converter module and any computer monitor can be turned into a TV
    A few posts later he said:

    Originally Posted by sacflies View Post
    Forget all the above. It was not the TV. The problem is in my WD TV player.
    lol, I did not notice that he mentioned that while I was speed reading Thanks for pointing that out!
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  15. Solution
    Buy a 2010 new blue ray DVD player. play your new blue rays in new recent blue ray player or PS3, PS4.
    But all your copies, regardless of format on the older blue ray player.
    Today , there are only sure work around on the PS3 and possible on the PS4 as well as the xbox.
    Sp, do not brake your head until some genius in the hack world comes with a true solution to remove cinevia.
    In the mean time, using a 2010 or older blue ray player is the 100% solution.
    Now, on you PS3 make sure you do not up grade the software to a very recent firmware, keep it as is as longest it works fine.
    I just finish playing a copy from a blue ray remastered to xvid then to DVD, and it played perfect, without the annoying cinevia water marking .
    This is today the most sure way to play those marked blue rays discs and downloaded movies........remember, if you are going to play a blue ray copie for the first time on the new b ray player disconnect from the net work, the software that wakes cinevia is in the Blue ray player but also, this, Im not sure the player might use communication to the network.
    Last, use you laptop HDMI out and it will do 100%, and more there is some claim software that takes the water marking, guess what, it does not work, do not buy any software, it will not work.
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  16. Solution, 100%. Buy an older then 2010 B ray player, bring it home and tested with one of those water cinevia videos...if it works keep it if it not take it back.
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  17. As for the western digital, it will be a matter of speaking with WD support, if they tell you year and model with cinevia then you must buy and test the player before that year with one of the cinevia videos, if it work keep it if does not take it back
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  18. One important issue here, is that cinevia may be posting here and claiming WD is also on the cinevia bandwagon. So please reseach, do not discard WD as choice because you read some post....please research, test.
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  19. Originally Posted by dvdsham View Post
    Originally Posted by TooLFooL View Post
    Cinavia is the new MacroVision, and is a part of AACS. Until someone hacks that, there will be no simple solution.
    Macrovision is now rovi corporation... http://www.rovicorp.com/
    Cinavia works along with the implementation of blue ray players companies like Sony Samsung etc. What these companies agreed on , is to add a medium in the sound stream and video stream that will be detected by a software in the b ray player and allow 20 min play then give you the no sound and nuisance message. Now at theater, the player or system they do not have the Cinevia but the medium is the video stream being played so if you cam the movie, you will be catching the cinevia medium which eventually will go and be detected by the B ray player.
    1. The solution and 100 % solution. is to play the blue ray copy or movie copied in whatever format in a B ray/dvd player early 2011 or before, to make sure no firmware upgade is allowed, it contain the Cinevia detection software. I have several Blue rays and the old ones do not have the Cinevia softw.
    2. Use a lap top and stream via HDMI, Vga to TV.
    3. Use a Ps3 and return the date to an earler date, and not take upgrades.
    The last route if you like new players, buy them test them with and infected Cinevia file, if it plays well, keep it, it does not return it and get another brand and do the same until you find a brand which is not aligned with the profiteers Sony Samsung and blue ray disc makers.
    Last, this issue is being worked by our geniuses, already....believe me 2 thing are going to happen, 1 this Cinevia will be taken care of, and the blue ray will die the same way HD video and beta and the 8 track, and laser disc....so be patient, with al the flash memories going around the Blue ray format is sure to be killed sonn, is alredy suffering fro the Netflix , Hulu, Amazon ailment.

    For those already immersed on cinevia virus way around, I like to add that recently I had downloaded some software and after ward for the first time a downloaded video burned on my pc then transferred to USB flash attached to play on Samsung B ray gave me an intro to Cinevia. The point is that, I experience a " rovi "virus detected by malware bytes and it seem it might still be. So please run virus test and malware the like of "Rovi' on your Pc before burning cam rip or else.
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  20. Would like an audio sample with Cinavia protection in place, for me to experiment with. If you have an older disk (without the protection) and a newer one that has it, I'd be interested in both copies of the audio. To get the audio, take a VOB file, and then use FFMPEG to demultiplex the AC3 audio stream. It should be saved as a file name like NameOfOriginalVobFile.AC3

    If you don't have an older copy, but just a newer one (with the protection in place), that's fine too (just will remove one possible method of attempting to isolate the Cinavia signal).
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