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  1. Dear Video Help users

    My name is James Wright, I live in England and I'm a amateur event and wildlife photographer. I've got a bit of time on my hands the next few months and I want to start out in video. I just wondered where was the best place to start? I've done some DSLR video, but I want to get to grips with something more complicated like a broadcast camera, could anyone recommend me a website where I could discover more information! Or a course that I could go on to learn something.

    It would be great to start to expand my knowledge base.

    Hope I haven't been to vague!
    Last edited by James Wright; 17th Jan 2011 at 12:44. Reason: New title
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  2. Member budwzr's Avatar
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    I looked at a review at videomaker for Vegas, and they're still stuck on version 8/9.

    http://www.videomaker.com/learn/product-reviews/software/editing/sony-vegas/

    Not exactly the latest info.
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  3. Originally Posted by filmboss80 View Post
    Although I don't have a problem paying for a course, I do have a problem with a website that is asking me to pay for content, especially if it is out of date! Thanks though, there are actually some great videos that I'm watching now, they just seem to buffer really really slowly!
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    Originally Posted by James Wright View Post
    Originally Posted by filmboss80 View Post
    Although I don't have a problem paying for a course, I do have a problem with a website that is asking me to pay for content, especially if it is out of date! Thanks though, there are actually some great videos that I'm watching now, they just seem to buffer really really slowly!
    Oh, sorry--did you think I was trying to sell subscriptions? (I actually think a lot of their reviews are dubious, as the products come from manufacturers who advertise with them. And their website articles are delayed behind their print publications.) I should have been more specific in directing you to their video tutorials for fledgling videographers. You wanted info, and it's just a place to start.

    Hopefully, others will be able to come up with something more helpful.
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  5. Member budwzr's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by James Wright View Post
    I've got a bit of time on my hands the next few months and I want to start out in video. I just wondered where was the best place to start?
    Watch a few older movies and try to understand how they are put together. In the old Hitch**** films you could see quite clearly three layers. A background of stock footage, actors in the middle, and something onstage moving around in the front.

    That kind of compositing is still done today, and the basic principle remains unchanged. Once you grasp the timeline's vertical tracks as a compositing area that's a good place to start. The real power of an NLE is in the vertical plane.

    The knowledge you gain from learning editing will directly translate into your camera technique, and good camera technique is critical. The clothes may make the man, but the camera does not make the video. Learn how to hold the camera completely still, how to pan it smoothly, and don't zoom while shooting.

    Also, viewers have become trained to expect certain things, like "butt-cuts", or fast cuts, not transitions. The mark of a pro is to hide the edits, not exaggerate them with flying effects, page curls, etc. Less is more.

    Let the content speak for itself in the least intrusive way, and get to the point right away. Titling is extremely boring, just get the meat out there and leave the buns until the end.

    And finally, a still photo of a bird may be interesting, but a video of a bird sitting still is not. If you film a pelican landing and taking off after a few minutes, cut out the sitting still part and slomo the action part to make up the gap.

    Good luck
    Last edited by budwzr; 17th Jan 2011 at 13:27.
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  6. Member edDV's Avatar
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    Use your "bit of time" to shoot various random clips of interest, then learn to use an NLE (non-linear editor). The more you edit, the better you will get at shooting for the edit and shooting for video compression.
    Recommends: Kiva.org - Loans that change lives.
    http://www.kiva.org/about
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  7. Member budwzr's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by edDV View Post
    ... shooting for the edit ...

    At that point you will have learned - grasshopper.
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  8. Originally Posted by budwzr View Post
    Originally Posted by edDV View Post
    ... shooting for the edit ...

    At that point you will have learned - grasshopper.
    Brilliant

    Anyone recommend a video editor?
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  9. Member edDV's Avatar
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    Look at

    AVID Media Composer (if cutting a major production)
    Adobe Premiere Pro (if you want tight integration with the rest of the Adobe Suite)
    Apple Final Cut Pro (for Mac)
    Sony Vegas Pro (alternate to Final Cut for the independents)

    The above also have consumer oriented starter editions (e.g. Premiere Elements and Sony Vegas Platinum)
    Recommends: Kiva.org - Loans that change lives.
    http://www.kiva.org/about
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  10. Member budwzr's Avatar
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    The "Filmmaker's Handbook" will give you a complete overview, and there are many sections that cover the basics of different types of shots and techniques.

    This is a reference book, not a novel, and it is very comprehensive but not too technical. The newest edition is 2007, but it's still current as far as the methods and techniques.

    It's certainly worth the small money it costs.
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  11. AVID Media Composer (if cutting a major production)
    Adobe Premiere Pro (if you want tight integration with the rest of the Adobe Suite)
    Apple Final Cut Pro (for Mac)
    Sony Vegas Pro (alternate to Final Cut for the independents)
    I suppose this is a big decision, learning how to use one editor and then changing isn't ideal! I'll have to read some reviews, I've got 2 macs but don't think they will be powerful enough to do the video, but then again I'd love to use Final Cut!

    Filmmaker's Handbook
    Just ordered one from amazon, thanks for all the help.
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  12. Member edDV's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by James Wright View Post
    AVID Media Composer (if cutting a major production)
    Adobe Premiere Pro (if you want tight integration with the rest of the Adobe Suite)
    Apple Final Cut Pro (for Mac)
    Sony Vegas Pro (alternate to Final Cut for the independents)
    I suppose this is a big decision, learning how to use one editor and then changing isn't ideal! I'll have to read some reviews, I've got 2 macs but don't think they will be powerful enough to do the video, but then again I'd love to use Final Cut!
    Whatever you learn on one mostly transfers to the others. I learned on linear online systems (CMX/Grass Valley) then moved early into Premiere. After Premiere, Vegas and Final Cut were quick to learn.

    What doesn't transfer is the muscle memory for keyboard and menus. That must be re-learned.
    Recommends: Kiva.org - Loans that change lives.
    http://www.kiva.org/about
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  13. You might have a look at "Shut Up and Shoot: freelance video guide" by Anthony Q. Artis. The Filmmakers Handbook is excellent. I have Ed Pincus's book from the mid-seventies, and he's the best. However, I would recommend taking a course at your local community college. Filmmaking is not a solitary activity, though many in the business should be taken to Devil's Island.
    Last edited by The_Imp; 3rd Jul 2015 at 13:10. Reason: grammar
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  14. Welcome to VideoHelp, Imp.

    Going forward, please check the dates of the posts you're responding to. If OP hasn't figured it out in the last 4 1/2 years he's probably lost interest.
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