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  1. I don't understand how .srt files for video files with different fps differ, if they don't take fps into a count ( the form is HH:MM:SS,MS). I guess it does actually takes fps into a count, but how? I mean, it is represented using hours, minutes,secons and miliseconds, so it shouldn't matter since fps only determines how many frames are in 1 sec, but one sec is still one sec?

    It's a newbie question (I know) but I still need it for a uni c++ project.

    Thanks in advance.
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  2. Framerate determines how long the video lasts so, for example, the timings will be different for a film on a 25fps PAL DVD than they will be on a 23.976fps NTSC DVD. For a hundred minute film the PAL version will be a bit over 4 minutes shorter as compared to the NTSC (and the theater) version. The timings in the SRT files for the NTSC and the PAL versions will reflect that.
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  3. Member AlanHK's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Mercurialol View Post
    I don't understand how .srt files for video files with different fps differ
    They don't.

    Only the absolute time matters in SRT files.
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  4. Originally Posted by manono View Post
    Framerate determines how long the video lasts so, for example, the timings will be different for a film on a 25fps PAL DVD than they will be on a 23.976fps NTSC DVD. For a hundred minute film the PAL version will be a bit over 4 minutes shorter as compared to the NTSC (and the theater) version. The timings in the SRT files for the NTSC and the PAL versions will reflect that.
    My question was exactly that. Why?

    Thanks
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  5. Why? It's self-evident. A film has a fixed number of frames. Surely you can understand that if those frames are played at 25fps the film will complete more quickly than it will if they're played at 24fps, right? Therefore, for the PAL version the dialog will occur progressively earlier as the film progresses. At the very beginning the dialog between the 2 versions might match up. By the end of a 2 hour movie the PAL dialog might precede the NTSC dialog by about 5 minutes. That's the only way the SRT files of the 2 movies will differ - by the differing timings.
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  6. Thanks, got it now.
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