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  1. Member
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    I am currently using tsMuxeR & RipBot for my Blu-ray movies. This is taking to long (about 3 hours) to get to a 10gb or smaller file. Below are my PC spec's. Is there a faster way to get a BD to a 10gb or smaller file in one opperation? It can be any type of file my player plays most all.


    -Intel Core i7 975 Extrem Edition 3.33 Ghz

    -12 GB DDR3 1600 Memory

    -Nvidia 480 GX

    -Veloci Raptor 10,000 RPM Hard Drive

    -Corsair Water Cooling

    -Creative labs Titanium Professional

    -LG 24x CD/DVD Combo

    -LG 10x Blu Ray Burner With Lightscribe

    -Microsft Windows 7 Ultimate 64 bit
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  2. Member Wolfen's Avatar
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    Take a look at some of the free apps in the tools section for some other alternatives.
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  3. BDRB using manual encoder settings at "Good" quality, target file size BD5 or BD9. Or automatic, one pass.
    Last edited by fritzi93; 22nd Jun 2010 at 20:57.
    Pull! Bang! Darn!
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  4. You need a better processor mate, that I7 was ok twelve hours ago, but things move fast in the IT world.
    You need a lot more cores maybe 12 or more, get a xeon processor
    Corned beef is now made to a higher standard than at any time in history.
    The electronic components of the power part adopted a lot of Rubycons.
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    wow..you think 3 hours is too long to re-encode a full HD Video? get out now man! or get a huge hard drive and a WD TV.
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  6. Member hech54's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by neworldman View Post
    Is there a faster way to get a BD to a 10gb or smaller file in one opperation?
    I learned a long time ago that ripping the entire DVD to the hard drive first before transcoding was always faster than trying to do it from the disc. I suspect Blu Ray is no different.
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    my quad core 6600 with ripbot264 quality of 4.1@18 x264 to 720p generally takes just about 3hours to code and takes it down to 3 to 5gb for the video portion. I rip to hard drive first with anydvd, spend about 5 or 10 minutes setting up the files on a que and then run it overnight. usually do three films on qua overnight that way.
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  8. Member
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    Code:
    "...Is there a faster way to get a BD to a 10gb or smaller file..."
    Potential bottlenecks = processing, I/O, & software. If/when increasing CPU processing capacity is impractical, look for ways to include your GPU. RE: I/O, 1 fast drive is nice -- 2 are better if/when you can read from 1, write to the other. Look for ways to increase BD to hdd transfer rate -- from what I've read LG BD drives aren't always the fastest reading, & MediaCodeSpeedEdit doesn't seem to help. Make sure other software/services aren't slowing I/O down. If you're reducing frame size, look for/develop strategies where the orig video is read, re-sized, *then* transferred/written to another drive -- you'll be moving fewer pixels from point A to point B, which takes less time. RE: software, besides looking for GPU hardware acceleration, consider mpg2 output -- if speed is your sole issue, mpg2 can take less work to encode.

    Of course the easiest ways to deal with the time it takes for any video conversion are: 1) get another PC/laptop so you can do your thing while the PC chugs away, or 2) walk away & do something else -- you get to have more of a life, or if you insist on a practical motivation, the ambient temps of the air your PC breaths will go down [normally a good thing]. Besides, it really doesn't enjoy the way you sit there glaring at it.
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  9. -Intel Core i7 975 Extrem Edition 3.33 Ghz
    This cpu is way to slow for video encoding. You should buy Core i7 980x!!!
    BTW. Who told you that video encoding must be fast?
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    Thanks for the info. MakeMkv works fast. But I would like a smaller file like 8gb to 4gb. Will HandBrake work to shrink a big Mkv file? Is there a better shrink program out there? Also I was told to get the Blu-Ray file to your hard drive before you do any shrinking works much faster. Is MakeMkv the fastest way to get the file form the Blu-Ray to hard drive?
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  11. Member wulf109's Avatar
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    MKV step is a pointless waste of time. Rip with Anydvd and encode with BD Rebuilder. Do you want to burn BD(BD25,BD9,BD5) disk or play from your computer?
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  12. Member
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    Originally Posted by wulf109 View Post
    MKV step is a pointless waste of time. Rip with Anydvd and encode with BD Rebuilder. Do you want to burn BD(BD25,BD9,BD5) disk or play from your computer?

    My goal is to fine the fastest way with the best PQ quality and a file size of 4 to 10gb's. I play these on my Popcorn Hour & WDTV live through USB hard drives. I have three 2 tb drives that are filling up fast with 20 to 50 gb files. The MakeMkv worked fast but was still a big file. When you say rip with Anydvd...... what does this mean? I only use AnydvdHD for the encryption part. Can it rip to my hard drive? If so how?
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  13. Fastest speed and best quality are mutually exclusive. So, if "fast" is a priority with "good" quality, you need a generous bitrate. That would mean at least BD9 size for the average movie, IMO. Again, you could try BDRB at fastest manual settings or automatic one-pass.

    [EDIT] To clarify: the slower encoding settings are for more efficient allocation of bitrate, hence the "best" quality for a given size. Up the bitrate (therefore target file size as well) and you can get away with faster settings.
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  14. Member wulf109's Avatar
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    In Anydvd,right click the icon in your tray and you;ll see an option to rip to HD. Click it and select were you want it to rip the BR disk to. Of courese Anydvd will rip your DVD or BR,that's what it is designed for.
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  15. Member
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    Originally Posted by neworldman View Post
    Also I was told to get the Blu-Ray file to your hard drive before you do any shrinking works much faster.
    Think about it...

    A big part of working with HD is moving bits around. It takes far less time to write a 10GB file than a 35GB version, doesn't it? Likewise it takes less time to decode/encode a smaller frame -- fewer pixels to parse. And it's easier to fill/clog one drive channel than 2. I find that keeping those principles in mind I can often speed up HD workflow considerably.
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    Originally Posted by fritzi93 View Post
    Fastest speed and best quality are mutually exclusive. So, if "fast" is a priority with "good" quality, you need a generous bitrate. That would mean at least BD9 size for the average movie, IMO. Again, you could try BDRB at fastest manual settings or automatic one-pass.

    [EDIT] To clarify: the slower encoding settings are for more efficient allocation of bitrate, hence the "best" quality for a given size. Up the bitrate (therefore target file size as well) and you can get away with faster settings.
    Agree 100%, but if I may, it usually pays to consider the source -- I've seen some HD video that looked like very poorly up-scaled SD, & I hate to think of folks going through a very long encode wondering why the results don't look any better.
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