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  1. Hi,

    I've decided to invest in a BD writer and some BDs. I have a bunch of home videos originally recorded on VHS-C tapes which have in the last few years been transferred to DVD. As you might imagine, the stack of them is quite large--at least 10 DVDs. Having more than one copy of all these would as such be quite expensive. For that reason I'm looking into BDs, since I should in theory be able to reduce my stack then to 2-4 discs--a much more manageable amount. However I also want something that lasts. I have heard and read that dye-based discs (whether BD or just plain DVD) in general will degrade over time, and that a different metal-based format lasts longer? I confess I know next-to-nothing about this...All I know is that I've heard horror stories about people losing data to dye-based DVDs, and as such I cringed when I heard that this format percolated its way up to the Blu-ray format. Could someone advise me a particular brand/type that will last more than a couple years (ideally 10 or more)?

    I've looked at these two myself:

    http://www.amazon.com/Verbatim-97090-Blu-ray-Single-Layer-Recordable/dp/B002WCRC2S/ref...pr_product_top

    http://www.amazon.com/Verbatim-96769-Blu-ray-Single-Layer-Recordable/dp/B001MYT5OK/ref...3541846&sr=1-5

    I looked at these because I heard that Verbatim was reliable, and that Ritek (apparently the manufacturer for several other brands) is not. I know that the top one is dye-based, so I'm still skeptical, but figured you guys could tell me whether that skepticism might be unwarranted. The bottom one's the same brand but, I think it's *not* dye-based, correct? Please, correct me if I'm wrong. I swear I'm not trying to sound like some know-it-all here... in fact I don't really know anything about any of this.

    To sum up, I'm just looking for a brand/type of recordable blu-ray disc that will last long.
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  2. Always Watching guns1inger's Avatar
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    They are both dye based - that is the technology used for burning, be-it CD, DVD or Bluray. The difference may be in the type of dye used, but I believe Verbatim use AZO-based dyes for all their bluray blanks.
    Read my blog here.
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  3. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
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    100 verbatim dvd-r sells for about $20 delivered on a good day. $25 if you are not lucky. for $2.50 you can back up your entire collection and you wouldn't have to have someone guide you through making playable blu-rays if you have a blu-ray burner that is. plus that's less than a single bd-r disc. if 10 dvds aren't manageable i feel sorry for you, you'd probably have a heart attack if you came here and had to deal with the thousands of dvds on my shelves.....

    oh yeah, welcome to the forum!
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  4. Banned
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    There are no metal based recordable dvd media.
    That is only pressed disc's.

    Originally Posted by aedipuss View Post
    if 10 dvds aren't manageable i feel sorry for you, you'd probably have a heart attack if you came here and had to deal with the thousands of dvds on my shelves.....
    LOL!!

    I was thinking the same thing when i read that.
    I have 500 burned dvd disc's alone of concerts just sitting next to my PC desk and that's a small percentage of whats in my entire house!!
    Burned and pressed!!
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    Rewritable dvds and Blu ray use phase change materials. And Blu ray using inorganic writing layers can use a Si/CU alloy: http://www.blu-raydisc.com/Assets/Downloadablefile/BD-R_Physical_3rd_edition_0602f1-15268.pdf
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  6. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
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    there are the confusing dyes from verbatim - metal azo is used in dvdr and metal ablative in bdr. they are dyes though, not metal layers as in pressed discs like noahtuck mentioned.

    a verbatim dvdr with metal azo dye is stable for decades if kept out of direct sunlight/uv light. like all laser light burned media uv will destroy the dye over time.

    this is just some blank media i keep within easy reach under my desk

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  7. Banned
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    The first link in the original post is for LTH media. We recently had a discussion on that. It's not well supported and some of our members are dubious about it. I wouldn't touch it at this time if it was my decision.

    Wow, I thought I had a lot of blank media lying around my house, but I see that I'm just a piker compared to aedipuss
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  8. Hi,

    Thanks for all the input. I have a much better understanding of things now. Okay, so all burned discs use dye, and Verbatim uses metal azo dye which lasts so long as not exposed to sunlight. However, LTH discs are still something to be wary about, at least compatibility-wise. Does anyone know though, if at least the Verbatim LTH discs still use the same dye as the other Verbatim discs?

    Thanks for all the help so far. I appreciate it.


    ...Wow. That's quite a collection, aedipuss. Surely that will last you a good ten years?
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  9. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
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    hehe, no it's part of the business here. when feeding a disc duplicator 7 at a time they don't last all that long.


    older Blu-ray players and recorders can't utilize BD-R LTH because it uses the same organic dye technology as dvdr. non-LTH bd-r use inorganic(metal based liquid dye spun onto the blanks in layers)
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    I'm not convinced the inorganic layer in BD-R disks can be described as a "dye" layer. As another example: http://www.tdk-media.eu/en/bluray/recordinglayerdesign.php Though this just repeats information I linked in my earlier post, it gives a simpler view.
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  11. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
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    i didn't make it up. from tdk

    "TDK is pleased to be the first to market with bare Blu-ray Disc media, which can be counted among the most significant product introductions in the company's distinguished 70 year history," noted Bruce Youmans, TDK Vice President of Marketing. "TDK has been involved in the development of blue laser recording technology since 1998, and TDK innovations such as hard coating and our inorganic dye formulation have played an essential role in making this revolutionary new format a reality. From backing up today's large capacity hard drives and servers to authoring and recording high definition video and sharing high resolution digital image collections, TDK Blu-ray Discs set new standards in recording and playback by offering unprecedented capacities, fast transfer rates and revolutionary durability."
    Making Blu-ray Discs a Reality
    TDK Blu-ray Discs are manufactured to the highest quality standards at the company's Chikumagawa Techno Factory in Japan. Outfitted with state of the art technology, the Chikumagawa factory is poised to lead the charge on optical media development well into the future. TDK heavily committed its worldwide engineering resources to Blu-ray, and has created new formulations and manufacturing techniques that constitute revolutionary milestones in recording technology.
    The high-sensitivity inorganic recording material utilized by TDK for the write-once type BD-R is completely different than the recording materials used for CD or DVD. TDK Blu-ray Discs' inorganic material is impervious to light, making the discs exceptionally well suited for archiving data. Composed of copper and silicon, TDK's exclusive CuSi recording material delivers remarkable, long-lasting performance. The recording material enables fast recording and playback speeds and also makes it possible to realize massive capacities through multi-layering. For TDK's rewritable BD-RE Blu-ray Disc media, a specially designed high-sensitivity phase change recording material is utilized. The material is so stable that a TDK Blu-ray Disc shows virtually no performance degradation even after it has been overwritten 10,000 times. The 25GB and 50GB BD-R and BD-RE discs offer 2x (72Mbps) rated recording speed. Based on simulated acceleration tests, TDK's archival life expectancy rating for Blu-ray Disc media is more than 50 years.
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  12. Member
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    Ha, they are a bit inconsistent on what they call it. A metallic film in one document, an inorganic dye in another...
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