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  1. Member
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    Dec 2008
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    Colombia
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    I have the FX 1000 and Z7 HDV cameras. Both have some really neat color adjustments in camera to get a unique look. I also have magic bullet looks, it has some great filters. If I use Magic Bullet, I get a great look but render time is terrible. If I adjust color, gamma, black in camera, I still like the look and it renders normally. I am trying to list out the pros and cons of each method to decide which is the best way to go, in camera adjustment or use a filter in post? Any help from you folks with more experience is appreciated!
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  2. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
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    Oct 2005
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    i'm editing a 3 cam shoot of the musical aida currently. for me, i matched the cams - 2 canon gl's and a canon hv30 as closely as possible while on location, but there is still some color correction to be done in post. i'd aim for the same thing with your cameras, and save as much hassle during editing as possible.....
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  3. Member edDV's Avatar
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    Mar 2004
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    Northern California, USA
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    Originally Posted by 392 View Post
    ...If I adjust color, gamma, black in camera, I still like the look and it renders normally. I am trying to list out the pros and cons of each method to decide which is the best way to go, in camera adjustment or use a filter in post?
    If you make the video non-standard in the field, then you can't get back to normal or match other clips later.

    Normally you shoot with nominal settings in the field and adjust in post. The main issues in the field are getting white balance and exposure correct. During the day, ambient color temperature changes and this must be compensated with white balsnce. A white card is usually used for reference. When you move indoors, indoor color temp varies with every bulb or open window.

    There are always exceptions to any rule, but altering black level, gamma and tinting color in the field seems dangerous to me unless it is for some special effect. Compounding the issue is carrying a reference monitor into the field, tenting the monitor and letting your eyes adjust to the tented monitor. Camera viewfinders or LCD viewers were never intended for image quality assessment, only for framing the shot.
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