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  1. Hi All,

    I've ripped all of my DVD's to Files (video_ts) with AnyDVD HD. I want to convert to ISO as well with ImgBurn. On some of the dual layer ISO's I've created, the ISO file is bigger than the original video_ts file. Is this normal and if so is it because of the padding used for the layer break? I always thought the ISO should be the exact same size as the original video_ts file.

    Thanks!
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  2. Mod Neophyte Super Moderator redwudz's Avatar
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    The ISO will be slightly bigger. There is some overhead involved. If it's a whole lot bigger, then maybe a problem. How much bigger is your average VIDEO_TS folder converted to the ISO file?
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    Originally Posted by redwudz View Post
    The ISO will be slightly bigger.
    By a negligible amount....
    If it's a lot or enough to make it so you can not burn it to the disc then as redwudz stated there is something else going on.

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    The difference between my VIDEO_TS folder and ISO is so small it's not even worth bothering to think about....
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  4. Originally Posted by redwudz View Post
    The ISO will be slightly bigger. There is some overhead involved. If it's a whole lot bigger, then maybe a problem. How much bigger is your average VIDEO_TS folder converted to the ISO file?
    Most of the ISO's are the same size as the original files but I have a couple where the original filesize is 7.15 gb and the ISO file is 7.45 gb, that seems like a big difference to me.
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    I don't have much to add. I mostly just wanted to take part in a thread where everyone is correct. I'm not sure I've seen this before.
    Originally Posted by redwudz
    The ISO will be slightly bigger. There is some overhead involved.
    Originally Posted by Noahtuck
    By a negligible amount...
    Originally Posted by bbanderic
    ...is it because of the padding used for the layer break?
    Put them all together, and you get:
    The ISO will be slightly bigger. There is some overhead involved, although it's generally a relatively negligible amount (when considering the capacity of the disk). Remember, though, that since an ISO is a direct representation of the layout as it would exist on a disk, if the source material exceeds the capacity of a single layer disk, any layer break padding adds to the size of the ISO.
    If the ISO is meant to be burned (at any time) to a disk, you should still pick the best layer break, and let the chips fall where they may. If that means the ISO will be larger, so be it.

    If, however, the ISO is only being used as a container (never to be burned), the closest you'll come to the size of the AUDIO_TS - VIDEO_TS structure (using ImgBurn for the ISO preparation) is by using the following settings:

    In the frame on the right side of the ImgBurn window, select the "Advanced" tab.
    Select the "Media" tab
    Select "Custom" for the "Double Layer" Profile
    Copy the value in the "Media Capacity" box
    Paste the value into the "Max Sectors in L0" box

    Then just make the ISO.
    After you're done, make sure you set the "Double Layer" Profile back to "DVD+R DL".
    Last edited by VegasBud; 19th Feb 2010 at 01:57. Reason: An inability to correctly spell "paste" on the first try
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  6. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
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    Only DVD-Video data goes in VIDEO_TS.
    Other folders (including hidden ones) can cause more space use in an ISO.

    7.15 and 7.45 both need a DVD+R DL anyway.
    Want my help? Ask here! (not via PM!)
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  7. Originally Posted by VegasBud View Post
    I don't have much to add. I mostly just wanted to take part in a thread where everyone is correct. I'm not sure I've seen this before.
    Originally Posted by redwudz
    The ISO will be slightly bigger. There is some overhead involved.
    Originally Posted by Noahtuck
    By a negligible amount...
    Originally Posted by bbanderic
    ...is it because of the padding used for the layer break?
    Put them all together, and you get:
    The ISO will be slightly bigger. There is some overhead involved, although it's generally a relatively negligible amount (when considering the capacity of the disk). Remember, though, that since an ISO is a direct representation of the layout as it would exist on a disk, if the source material exceeds the capacity of a single layer disk, any layer break padding adds to the size of the ISO.
    If the ISO is meant to be burned (at any time) to a disk, you should still pick the best layer break, and let the chips fall where they may. If that means the ISO will be larger, so be it.

    If, however, the ISO is only being used as a container (never to be burned), the closest you'll come to the size of the AUDIO_TS - VIDEO_TS structure (using ImgBurn for the ISO preparation) is by using the following settings:

    In the frame on the right side of the ImgBurn window, select the "Advanced" tab.
    Select the "Media" tab
    Select "Custom" for the "Double Layer" Profile
    Copy the value in the "Media Capacity" box
    Paste the value into the "Max Sectors in L0" box

    Then just make the ISO.
    After you're done, make sure you set the "Double Layer" Profile back to "DVD+R DL".
    My intent is to prepare an image that can do both, burn a copy to disc if needed and use as a container for the future. I plan on getting a media player and play the ISO's from an external hard drive. Can I have it both ways without any problems, will there be an issue playing back a "burnable" ISO file in a media player? I'm looking real hard at the "Dune Prime" but man is it expensive, $449!

    Thanks guys.
    Last edited by bbanderic; 19th Feb 2010 at 20:32.
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    bbanderic,

    Originally Posted by VegasBud
    If the ISO is meant to be burned (at any time) to a disk, you should still pick the best layer break, and let the chips fall where they may. If that means the ISO will be larger, so be it.
    Since you want to retain the ability to "burn a copy to disc if needed", you should prepare the ISO that way (pick the best layer break when creating the ISO, and don't worry about the size).

    The "smallest possible ISO" (for dual layer dvd-video) settings (for ImgBurn) I described would be useful only in providing the smallest disk space requirement for the ISOs (the number of ISOs which could fit on a given hard drive would be maximized). How many more ISOs would fit on a given hard drive would vary with each collection of ISOs. If the example you provided (7.15 GB vs 7.45 GB) represented the average in a given collection, a one TB drive would hold about 7 more ISOs (131 vs 124) if the disk space used for layer breaks was removed. If the example which Noahtuck provided was the average, you wouldn't get any more ISOs on the drive. The upside of using "smallest possible ISO" is the most efficient use of the storage space on a hard drive , the downside is it should never be burned (as is) to a DVD+R DL. You would need to extract a "smallest possible ISO" to the VIDEO_TS - AUDIO_TS structure, and let ImgBurn create a proper DVD+R DL "layer break included" ISO (from that structure) if you wanted to burn it to a dvd (or just burn the extracted structure directly, without creating an ISO first).

    Regardless of which way you create the ISO, the entire source material is present in the ISO. The only thing that's changing is the layout of that material as it would exist on a dvd disk, so you shouldn't "have an issue" using either one in a media player.
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  9. Originally Posted by VegasBud View Post
    bbanderic,

    Originally Posted by VegasBud
    If the ISO is meant to be burned (at any time) to a disk, you should still pick the best layer break, and let the chips fall where they may. If that means the ISO will be larger, so be it.
    Since you want to retain the ability to "burn a copy to disc if needed", you should prepare the ISO that way (pick the best layer break when creating the ISO, and don't worry about the size).

    The "smallest possible ISO" (for dual layer dvd-video) settings (for ImgBurn) I described would be useful only in providing the smallest disk space requirement for the ISOs (the number of ISOs which could fit on a given hard drive would be maximized). How many more ISOs would fit on a given hard drive would vary with each collection of ISOs. If the example you provided (7.15 GB vs 7.45 GB) represented the average in a given collection, a one TB drive would hold about 7 more ISOs (131 vs 124) if the disk space used for layer breaks was removed. If the example which Noahtuck provided was the average, you wouldn't get any more ISOs on the drive. The upside of using "smallest possible ISO" is the most efficient use of the storage space on a hard drive , the downside is it should never be burned (as is) to a DVD+R DL. You would need to extract a "smallest possible ISO" to the VIDEO_TS - AUDIO_TS structure, and let ImgBurn create a proper DVD+R DL "layer break included" ISO (from that structure) if you wanted to burn it to a dvd (or just burn the extracted structure directly, without creating an ISO first).

    Regardless of which way you create the ISO, the entire source material is present in the ISO. The only thing that's changing is the layout of that material as it would exist on a dvd disk, so you shouldn't "have an issue" using either one in a media player.
    Thanks for the info VegasBud, and others, very much appreciated! Storage space is not a concern so I'll keep doing what I was doing and prepare the ISO's as "burn a copy to disc if needed".
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