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  1. Back in the 'good ol days' of DVD I used to use DVD Shrink to remove parts of the DVD I didn't want, or if I just wanted to backup the main movie.

    But now I have moved over to Bluray I would like to know what program's can do the same sort of things as DVD Shrink.

    I have had a look at the guides section and it appears that there are a few program's available but I do not yet have a Bluray drive in my PC so I can't experiment with them to see what there all about.

    So, for those of you that have Bluray ripping experience could you give me your thought's and opinion's on which program's you are using and why ?

    Could you also maybe suggest which Bluray drive's are giving the best performance before I make my decision which one to get, I would like to get a Writer but they seem very expensive at the moment so will probably be looking at ROM drive's for now.

    Thanks in advance
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  2. Mod Neophyte Super Moderator redwudz's Avatar
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    I use RipBot most times, to MKV on a DL disc, but BD Rebuilder seems to be popular. You can also use tsMuxeR to remove unwanted audio, video and subs. I rarely have problems with RipBot, and if I do, tsMuxeR seems to fix it. What do you plan to play the converted file with? Just the main BD movie is about 15 - 30GB.

    I have both a Sony and a LG BD ROM drive. I haven't seen much difference between either for reading, but the Sony was cheaper. I have a Pioneer BD burner, but I don't use it that often.
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  3. Originally Posted by redwudz
    What do you plan to play the converted file with? Just the main BD movie is about 15 - 30GB.
    I've been reading the guide about putting the movie on to a dual layer disc which I would like to have a play with first just to see what the quality is like.
    But I would also like to be able to play them from the hard drive on my PC and maybe convert them to stream to the XBOX 360 if this is possible.

    I've only just got my XBOX so still trying to aquire as much information about that and also need to build my Bluray knowledge.

    I've pretty much covered everything to do with DVD ripping/converting etc so now need to get clued up on all this HD stuff - I'm like a sponge-need to soak up knowledge
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  4. I use BDRB for re-encoding Blu-Ray backups and tsMuxer to author HD captures and extract movie only from BD discs. BdRebuilder is actually very much like DVDRebuilder (same author) and re-encodes. If on occasion I want an MKV, I just run the M2TS through HDConvertToX.

    Good luck.
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  5. Any more opinion's on this one
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  6. I forgot to ask one other question in my first post,

    I use DVD Shrink to take short sequences from different DVD's and compile on to one DVD, I like to take the best action sequences and put them together to show off my system

    Now, with the method's described here is it possible to do the same thing with Bluray and put them on to a dual layer DVD ? (to play on a Bluray player)

    If so could you please give me an idea of how it's done or point me in the direction of a good guide to follow.

    Thanks.
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  7. You're not getting much response.

    I'll offer a somewhat crude freeware method:

    Load the m2ts into tsSniper. Set for "Scene Mode", and clear the right-hand selection pane. Using the preview window, find and set your mark in point and mark out point. Add the selection and export the transport stream. Do this for each clip.

    Open tsMuxer. Under the Input tab, click "Add". Choose the first clip; for each one subsequent click "Join". Either accept the default 5 minute chapter timings or do the calculations necessary to set a chapter at the start of each clip. Choose AVCHD or Blu-Ray output and mux.

    A few observations:

    tsSniper is the best free h.264 transport stream cutter, IMO, and I've tried them all. It's not frame accurate, and h.264 is hard to edit. (TSPE is supposedly frame accurate, but it will cost you.) tsSniper works reasonably well. In my experience, if you set mark-in at the first frame of a scene change, it should be spot on. If you can set mark-out at a fade-out, it should make a reasonably clean cut.

    I can use either Blu-Ray or AVCHD output in tsMuxer and it doesn't make any difference to my (2) Sony BD-P360s. Dunno anything about the XBox. If intended for a Blu-Ray standalone, you need a unit that will at least play AVCHD. Here's a list:

    http://forum.doom9.org/showthread.php?t=146339&highlight=standalone+results

    It would be nice if there were programs for BD that were similar to the very convenient DVDShrink, but there are none. It's all still pretty new, and good freeware programs are scarce. I get by with tsSniper because I only use it for editing out adverts from HD captures. The other programs already mentioned are fine. Good luck.
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  8. Thanks fritzi93 for your comments, I'm wondering whether I'm asking the impossible or at least very difficult as my responses have been limited as you say.

    It's difficult for me to try these method's yet as I still do not have a Bluray drive, I'm desperate to get my hand's on one and get caught up with all this Bluray ripping/converting.

    In the meantime I'm just trying to gather a bit of information so I'm tooled up and ready to go when I get my drive.

    I'll be happy for anyone else to comment in the meantime as I'm sure there must be other's out there that are doing what I want to try - I can't believe I'm the only one !

    I've read several of the guides as I've already mentioned but it's nice to get a bit of feedback from you guys as to what work's and what doesn't.
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  9. I don't have a Blu-ray burner either, just a BD-ROM. Burners and discs are too damn expensive now.

    I got my BD-ROM for ~ $60 bucks, dunno what that is in Euros. :P

    AVC (h.264) is incredibly efficient. For most movies, if you do movie only and re-encode with BDRB to BD5, the result is very good. Some folks say indistinguishable from the original, which I think is ridiculous. But if you put movie only on a BD9 (dual-layer DVDR), then it comes close. In fact, I've been so pleased with the results that I think it will be a long time before I'm tempted to get a Blu-Ray burner. I have my HTPC, and two Sony BD-P360s, so I'm set.

    I tell you what, upconverted DVD is fine, but once you have Blu-Ray for a while, it's hard to watch DVD or SDTV any more. Sure, lots of people object to Blu-Ray for one reason or another, but it's the best thing going *right now*. If you're a cheapskate like me, you can get away with using freeware with one exception: AnyDVDHD. It's the only reliable BD decrypter.

    I expect as (if?) BD gains momentum, there will be a lot more tools available. Right now is like the early days of DVD.

    Good luck.
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  10. Originally Posted by fritzi93
    I don't have a Blu-ray burner either, just a BD-ROM. Burners and discs are too damn expensive now.

    I got my BD-ROM for ~ $60 bucks, dunno what that is in Euros. :P

    AVC (h.264) is incredibly efficient. For most movies, if you do movie only and re-encode with BDRB to BD5, the result is very good. Some folks say indistinguishable from the original, which I think is ridiculous. But if you put movie only on a BD9 (dual-layer DVDR), then it comes close. In fact, I've been so pleased with the results that I think it will be a long time before I'm tempted to get a Blu-Ray burner. I have my HTPC, and two Sony BD-P360s, so I'm set.

    I tell you what, upconverted DVD is fine, but once you have Blu-Ray for a while, it's hard to watch DVD or SDTV any more. Sure, lots of people object to Blu-Ray for one reason or another, but it's the best thing going *right now*. If you're a cheapskate like me, you can get away with using freeware with one exception: AnyDVDHD. It's the only reliable BD decrypter.

    I expect as (if?) BD gains momentum, there will be a lot more tools available. Right now is like the early days of DVD.

    Good luck.
    I remember what it was like when I was learning all about DVD ripping/converting.
    I think Bluray has come a long way since I last seriously visited this forum.
    I have ANYDVD HD so that's not a problem, and like you, I think I will just get a BD-ROM to start with due to the cost of writers.
    I'm really looking forward to seeing the quality of a BD9, just hope my PC is gonna be up to the job otherwise it's gonna be more money spent on new component's
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  11. You need a dual-core at minimum. Like in my computer specs, that's a minimalist system for Blu-Ray. When I built this HTPC, that was a deliberate choice. Although I have a good enough video card with DXVA that I can play BD rips on my HTPC with the CPU running in the single digits.

    It's when one tries to re-encode that the difference becomes most obvious. I have a spare rebuilt computer with an Intel CPU pretty much comparable to yours (Celeron D), and I tried a BDRB encode on it. It's painfully slow, I forget what exactly the estimated completion time was, but it was several days. So I canceled it and dismissed that notion. :P With my HTPC, I can do a re-encode overnight, so it's good enough for now.
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  12. Member wulf109's Avatar
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    If your getting into BlueRay you really should consider moving upto to a Quad-core. The best core 2 at 3.6Ghz will take 12-16 hours to compress a typical movie only. The cheapest quad,AMD X4-620 at 3.3GHZ will reduce that to 6 hours. An i7 at 3.6HT will reduce it to 4 hours.
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  13. Member rr6966's Avatar
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    I will second that as well. I'm using an Intel 9400 quad core, and it usually takes 6-8 hours. Was using a dual core processor and it took 18-24 hours with 3 ghz. So, fast powerful processor is required. I currently use BdRebuilder as my program of choice, and I've used it to on both DVD+R DL and BD-R. It is shocking how good movies look on DVD+R DL discs. Lately I've burnt more BD-R's because I'm finding quality discs for $2-$3 each.
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  14. They're right, of course. The mobo on my HTPC will accept a core 2 quad, just waiting for the price to go a bit lower. :P I can swap out a Conroe-L Celeron on another machine to re-use the duo.

    I should clarify that I use the "Better" setting in BDRB, the second fastest setting. The default setting is a good bit slower.
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  15. Thanks for the PC info guys.

    I should say that my PC specs that are listed are well out of date, I have moved on from there but dont have anything like dual or quad core.
    So I guess I'm gonna have to upgrade at some stage in order to be able to convert Bluray rips.
    I'll give it a go with what I've got when I finally get the BD-ROM but I'm not holding out any hope's of it working to well !

    And in the meantime I guess I should really update my spec's
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  16. I've moved from a dual core pentium 3.0 to a quad core amd phenom 3.2, and it's like the difference between night and day. With the dual core it would take up to 24 hrs to rebuild a blu-ray to bd25. Now, with the quad core it take approx. 2 hrs to rebuild a blu-ray to bd25.
    No more leaving the computer on overnight to back up a blu-ray.
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  17. Member
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    Originally Posted by mrswla
    I've moved from a dual core pentium 3.0 to a quad core amd phenom 3.2, and it's like the difference between night and day. With the dual core it would take up to 24 hrs to rebuild a blu-ray to bd25. Now, with the quad core it take approx. 2 hrs to rebuild a blu-ray to bd25.
    No more leaving the computer on overnight to back up a blu-ray.
    2 hrs you say?, @ what quality setting if I may ask bro'?

    ocgw

    peace
    i7 2700K @ 4.4Ghz 16GB DDR3 1600 Samsung Pro 840 128GB Seagate 2TB HDD EVGA GTX 650
    https://forum.videohelp.com/topic368691.html
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  18. High-Speed Option (BD-25). Here is my most recent back up:
    -----------------------
    [19:46:26] BD Rebuilder v0.31.02 (beta)
    - Source: TERMINATOR_SALVATION_DC
    - Input BD size: 26.03 GB
    - Approximate total content: [02:07:35.773]
    - Target BD size: 24.32 GB
    - Windows Version: 6.1 [7100]
    - Audio Settings: AC3=0 DTS=0 HD=1 Kbs=640
    [19:46:26] PHASE ONE, Encoding
    - [19:46:26] Extracting A/V streams [VID_00004]
    - [20:07:20] Reencoding: VID_00004 (1 of 2)
    - [21:31:04] Extracting A/V streams [VID_00032]
    - [21:31:15] Reencoding: VID_00032 (2 of 2)
    - [21:31:15] Reencoding secondary video [TRK_02]
    [21:35:17]PHASE ONE complete
    [21:35:17]PHASE TWO - Rebuild Started
    - [21:35:17] Rebuilding BD file Structure
    [21:35:20] - Encode and Rebuild complete
    - WORKFILES folder removed.
    [21:35:20]JOB: TERMINATOR_SALVATION_DC finished.
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  19. Some movies take longer than 2 hrs. But for the most part, they're around the 2 hr mark.
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    Originally Posted by mrswla
    Some movies take longer than 2 hrs. But for the most part, they're around the 2 hr mark.
    The "high-speed" option is 1 thing, but which of the (4) quality options did you choose, and what is your critique of the quality of the finished file?

    just curious as I always choose the longest encoding options, I have had "mixed results" with faster encoding with earier versions of BD Rebuilder

    Oh it will look great for 95% of the movie, but some movies a few scenes will show compression artifacts on my combination of hardware/software

    btw on all highest quality settings I get around 5-7 hrs encoding time on a highly oc'd AMD Phenom II X4 940 BE

    ocgw

    peace
    i7 2700K @ 4.4Ghz 16GB DDR3 1600 Samsung Pro 840 128GB Seagate 2TB HDD EVGA GTX 650
    https://forum.videohelp.com/topic368691.html
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  21. I've been mainly converting Blu Ray for my Apple TV, I find 720p quite nice for my Size tv which is a 46in Bravia. I Have a Dual Core 2.4 ghz not the Speediest, still it isn't too bad. I convert the Movie Only to MKV with MakeMKV. Then I use Handbrake to take that down to a 1280x H264 file using a CRF of about 65%. It looks and Plays great on the ATV. I can usually fit two of these rips onto a DVD-R for archival purposes.
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  22. Member wulf109's Avatar
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    High Speed(BD-25) is an available option in BDRB's Encoder Option sub menu. I've never tried it. This thread got me to try the Good(faster option) and it reduced encoding time by more than 50%. My encode time dropped from 6:20 to 2:50 on my AMD X4-620 at 3.3Ghz. I need to try it on my i7. The last few versions of BDRB seem very stable and the full disk option seems to work all the time not the hit and miss it used to be. The current version 31.05 even seems a bit faster.
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  23. Originally Posted by ocgw
    The "high-speed" option is 1 thing, but which of the (4) quality options did you choose, and what is your critique of the quality of the finished file?
    Most of the time I use Full Backup, High-Speed Option (BD-25), Custom Target Size. With Custom Target Size I start out at 25000 Megabytes and work my way back until the final output size is 23.2 gb. Yes I know there is a Target Size BD-25, but sometimes I find the compression too much, therefore I like to use the custom feature.

    I view them on a 42LG70. It's one of those 120Hz refresh rates. The only time that I notice any artifacts or compression is sometimes when there is rapid movement with text. The text will look a little fuzzy, but that has only happened a few times and it looks like it gets better with every new release of bdrb.
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  24. Member
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    Originally Posted by mrswla
    Originally Posted by ocgw
    The "high-speed" option is 1 thing, but which of the (4) quality options did you choose, and what is your critique of the quality of the finished file?
    Most of the time I use Full Backup, High-Speed Option (BD-25), Custom Target Size. With Custom Target Size I start out at 25000 Megabytes and work my way back until the final output size is 23.2 gb. Yes I know there is a Target Size BD-25, but sometimes I find the compression too much, therefore I like to use the custom feature.

    I view them on a 42LG70. It's one of those 120Hz refresh rates. The only time that I notice any artifacts or compression is sometimes when there is rapid movement with text. The text will look a little fuzzy, but that has only happened a few times and it looks like it gets better with every new release of bdrb.
    OK , but of the (4) quality settings

    fastest
    fast (default I think)
    slow
    slowest

    which are you using?

    ocgw

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    https://forum.videohelp.com/topic368691.html
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  25. I see five choices, not four. Here is a screenshot:


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  26. Member
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    Originally Posted by mrswla
    I see five choices, not four. Here is a screenshot:


    I think that high-speed option was separate in earlier BDRB versions if I remember correctly

    Anyway I see, I only tried the faster reencoding options a few times and never liked the results, even on highest quality setttings 1 out of 5 movies had a few scenes w/ artifacts that I couldn't over look

    Soooooo, I save main movie only and keep buying HDD's, got an planned upgrade path to 15TB lol

    ocgw

    peace
    i7 2700K @ 4.4Ghz 16GB DDR3 1600 Samsung Pro 840 128GB Seagate 2TB HDD EVGA GTX 650
    https://forum.videohelp.com/topic368691.html
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  27. Originally Posted by ocgw
    Soooooo, I save main movie only and keep buying HDD's, got an planned upgrade path to 15TB lol
    Nice
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  28. Member
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    Originally Posted by mrswla
    Originally Posted by ocgw
    Soooooo, I save main movie only and keep buying HDD's, got an planned upgrade path to 15TB lol
    Nice
    Thx hehe

    My trouble is watching a 56" @ 7' trying to capture that commercial theatre experience, it will expose all the flaws even in all but the best video

    ocgw

    peace
    i7 2700K @ 4.4Ghz 16GB DDR3 1600 Samsung Pro 840 128GB Seagate 2TB HDD EVGA GTX 650
    https://forum.videohelp.com/topic368691.html
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  29. Member wulf109's Avatar
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    Tried the HighSpeed-BD25 and Good on my i7 at 3.6Ghz HT enabled. Used a two hour movie,Indiana Jones-Crystal Skull.
    Normally at the default encoder setting it would take 4:30. The Good mode took 2:24. The HS-BD25 took 1:55 to complete. I noticed that in HS-BD25 it does not do the first encoder pass,it goes directly to the second pass which at twice the normal encode speed.
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  30. Member
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    Its just a pity all of these programs are essentially a ton of other utilities instead of just one single program. Oh well. Perhaps in 5 to 10 years *g*
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