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  1. Member
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    Oct 2009
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    Please Help!

    I just bought a new Sony Blu-ray BDV-IS1000 home theater system that is a Blu-ray player and receiver. I have an HDMI cable connecting the Blu-Ray receiver output to the input of my Samsung 56" DLP HDTV. However, when I tried to hookup my Motorola HD DVR to the Blu-Ray receiver I noticed that the HD DVR has no HDMI output, only DVI. So I bought a HDMI to DVI adapter so I could connect the HD DVR to the Blu-Ray receiver. So the HDMI cable goes from the input of Blu-Ray receiver to an adapter which turns it into a DVI so that I can plug it into the DVI output of the HD DVR. When I turn on the HD DVR, the cable will show up for about 2 seconds on my TV, then it will give me a message about content protection and shut off. I assume this has to do with HDCP protection. Is there a way to get around this? If not, how can I connect my HD DVR to my Blu-Ray receiver if my HD DVR only has a DVI output (and still get an awesome HD picture)? (My HD DVR does have component video output which I use currently but I want to get the best picture I can so I've been told to do that I need to have a digital signal and therefore must use an HDMI or DVI cable to hook the HD DVR to my Blu-Ray Receiver).For the audio, what gives better sound, an optical or a coaxial audio cable? I'm currently using an optical audio cable but for some reason, my rear surround sound speakers are barely audible. Does anyone know with the Sony Blu-Ray BDV-1000 receiver what settings to use to get the best sound? Thank you for your help, whoever you maybe. I don't have much except my home theater system so your help means the world to me.

    Ethan
    ethansolo@gmail.com
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  2. The DVI to HDMI cable should have worked. The digital video and HDCP are the same for both.

    Optical and coax give the same quality. They both carry the same digital data. Note that most material does not have a lot of sound in the back channels. You're receiver may have a test signal generator that lets you test and adjust all the speakers.
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  3. Member
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    I googled this and found a ton of people who had the same problem. I know theoretically it should work but for some reason it doesn't. I didn't use an HDMI to DVI cable though. I used an HDMI cable with an adapter on the end that went from HDMI to DVI. Could this be the problem then, that I need to use an actual HDMI to DVI cable instead of just an adapter?
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  4. Originally Posted by esolomon
    I googled this and found a ton of people who had the same problem. I know theoretically it should work but for some reason it doesn't. I didn't use an HDMI to DVI cable though. I used an HDMI cable with an adapter on the end that went from HDMI to DVI. Could this be the problem then, that I need to use an actual HDMI to DVI cable instead of just an adapter?
    No, the separate converter just does the same thing the converting cable does.
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  5. Member
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    So I tried a different HDMI cable with the adapter but still the same thing. I even tried a different HDMI to DVI adapter and got the same message. The cable picture comes up for 2 seconds then it a big message shows up that says: "The HD Content Protection of your display has been compromised. Please use the YPbPr outlets for your HD content." Has anyone else had this message or were you able to solve it?
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  6. As an experiment try running the DVI/HDMI converter/cable directly from the cable box to the HDTV (bypass the receiver). Does that work?
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  7. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    I'm guessing it's an HDCP flag messing things up by requiring everything be CP compliant, and that since everything may not be, then it's "shutting it out". Or a "timout" thing, as sometimes the handshake on HDMI can take quite a while, and with multiple devices, that may be compounded.

    Scott
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