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  1. Anyone else have this problem? Until recently, I bought only silver-top TYs and Verbatims. But this week I got a good deal on a couple hundred Verbatim DataLife 8x DVD-R with white printable surface. Unlike the white surface on most printable CD-Rs, this Verbatim surface is not matte but kind of "pearly", and it completely resists being written on with a Sharpie permanent marker. If I can't write on the damn things I can't use them . Any suggestions for a marker pen with good "traction" on pearly disc coatings?
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  2. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
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    Inkjet media are made to absorb ink, so it will actually suck the ink from the tip of a marker before it can refill itself, making writing harder than not. It really varies from batch to batch (remember that a true "batch" is hundreds of thousands of discs minimum). A few months ago, or in a few months from now, the surface may not be quite so quick to suck in the ink.
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  3. check the label. are they thermal disc printable?
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  4. Standard "Verbatim" label on the side of the cakebox reads "DataLife Plus Inkjet Printable DVD-R, Part No. 94854". LordSmurfs explanation makes sense, but I don't understand why I've never had this problem with any other "inkjet printable" surface? These Verbs don't seem to suck the ink too fast, its more like the pen can't get the ink down onto the surface at all. I've had similar problems with generic Sony media (the ordinary kind), but not to this degree. Weird.
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  5. that is strange, i've not come across any discs that a sharpie couldn't write on. for inkjet printables i use taiyo yudens, sharpies work fine on them. it almost sounds like someone sprayed them with waterproofing lacquer.
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  6. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
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    Sony and Ritek inkjet can be just as bad.
    Try to use an ULTRA FINE tip marker, those do better than EXTRA FINE tip Sharpies.
    It's the way the tip is designed.
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  7. Originally Posted by lordsmurf
    Sony and Ritek inkjet can be just as bad.
    is it that they need the ink to be heated like it would be out of an inkjet printer?
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    Honestly, all you need for writing on inkjet media is a free-flow ink of some kind. Many of the ULTRA FINE tips are good.

    I sometimes use gel-tip or ball-points, but you must be very light with it. Most people press down when they write, so they should not attempt this, they'll just screw up their discs.

    But fellow artists out there, especially inkers or colorists, you probably know how to be very gentle with pressure, just enough to write, but not enough to indent.

    If you're not a skilled or experienced artist, I warn you now, don't try to use "pens". You'll need to stick to markers.

    I've never really said this before in public, and I hesitate to do it now, because I can already see the flood of idiots with "I wrote on my disc with a pen and now its bad" posts, because they skimmed what I wrote.
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  9. "If you're not a skilled or experienced artist, I warn you now, don't try to use "pens". You'll need to stick to markers. "

    Yeah, because only artists could possibly learn to use less pressure when writing on certain surfaces. Similarly, only professional valets should attempt to park cars and only trained athletes should jump off diving boards.

    Oh, and the cost. I mean, good god, if someone should ruin their disc, they could be out 15, 20, maybe even 30 cents. It's a good thing you warned us.
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    Originally Posted by Clay201
    "If you're not a skilled or experienced artist, I warn you now, don't try to use "pens". You'll need to stick to markers. "

    Yeah, because only artists could possibly learn to use less pressure when writing on certain surfaces. Similarly, only professional valets should attempt to park cars and only trained athletes should jump off diving boards.

    Oh, and the cost. I mean, good god, if someone should ruin their disc, they could be out 15, 20, maybe even 30 cents. It's a good thing you warned us.
    So let me get this straight.....

    After 2 years of not posting you dug this old thread up just to flap your trap
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  11. Since someone reactivated this thread, I may as well take the opportunity to mention I finally found a solution to my problem with "marker-resistant" Verbatim inkjet surfaces. While my usual Sharpie fine point won't write on these, I discovered the big fat Sharpie Chisel Tip works perfectly. If I hold it at an angle, the tip emulates the fine point. Its more difficult to write smaller with, but its close enough. The chisel tip design seems to have a stronger ink flow.
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  12. There are water/alcohol based makers and there are organic solvent based markers. The former will write on hydryphilic surfaces, the latter on hydrophobic surfaces. Sharpies are alcohol based. So find some organic solvent based permanent marker. You can tell by the smell.
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  13. I can see it now, jagabo in the isle at Wallyworld open packages of permanent markers and sniffing them.....
    tgpo famous MAC commercial, You be the judge?
    Originally Posted by jagabo
    I use the FixEverythingThat'sWrongWithThisVideo() filter. Works perfectly every time.
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  14. "After 2 years of not posting you dug this old thread up just to flap your trap"

    I dug up this thread googling for a solution to the Verbatim/Sharpie problem.

    I'm going to give the organic solvent based markers a shot. If that doesn't work, I'll try the chisel tip. Thanks, jagabo and orsetto.
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  15. Super-old thread, but it's what came up in a Google search, for me and probably others, so I'll go with it.

    I'm having the same problem with new PlexDisc white inkjet printable BD-R discs: my Sharpie and also my Bic fine point marker seem to run out of ink after the first couple of letters.

    I've just written on the white top surface with a UniBall Signo 207. It's a ballpoint with ink that flows easily. It wrote consistently, without the drying-up that I experienced when writing with the Sharpie and Bic markers. The line of ink is very thin, but it is readable and looks much better than what I got with the markers. I was careful to keep it to a light touch.

    I assume the UniBall's ink is less likely to harm the disc's data layer than the ink of a permanent marker. Sharpie ink itself was fine -- it had no effect on data retrieval, even after five years.

    One concern I had was that maybe the ink wouldn't dry completely, and it would smear. That turned out not to be a problem, at least not with a light finger wipe five minutes after writing. But this is water-based ink, so I assume excess moisture, even wiped off immediately, could make the ink run.
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