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  1. I have a problem, and its driving me nuts. I have an old video that I want to put onto DVD right. Ok, so it has copy protection stopping me from just doing the easy thing and plugging the VCR into my DVD Recorder.

    So I have used Windows Movie Maker, and have plugged the VCR into my DV Camera, and have captured the video that way.

    The problem that is making my head thump, is that the video has come out 'Interlaced' (see URL for image) http://img36.imageshack.us/img36/1558/aaagh.jpg

    I have tried the following programs to de-interlace it for DVD.

    DVDFlick (De-Interlace option): Doesnt get rid of interlace
    DVDForger (De-Interlace, Bottom Field First), gets rid of it, but the audio comes out as if in slow motion
    Tmpgenc (Wont even accept the file)
    Windows DVD Maker (impossible time length to get to even 1%)

    I have searched the net, and some sites say I shouldnt even de-interlace the video, as the dvd player/tv should do it. it doesnt, when converted to dvd with DVDFlick, watching it still has lines all over it and its very distracting.

    Can anyone please help me? the AVI is 2 hours long, 25 frames per sec. I also tried Adobe Premier 6.0 to capture it, but it wont recognise my DV Camera (odd).
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  2. yes. and dvd is interlaced. pal dvd spec mpeg-2 is 720x576 25 fps interlaced. don't de-interlace it if it's going to dvd.

    dv cam video should be captured over firewire, pal is 720x576 in DVavi format, about 13GB per hour. you might give winDV a try with the cam, it's free.

    if it was captured in any other format than DVavi i'd start over.
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  3. Hi, the file is 24.4GB. It was captured over Firewire. How come I can still see the lines when its encoded to DVD? thats what im trying to fix.
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  4. Member edDV's Avatar
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    A standard TV will display interlace video directly.
    A digital SD or HD progressive TV will deinterlace in hardware. Quality varies.
    A progressive DVD player will deinterlace in hardware and output over analog component or HDMI. Quality varies.

    For playback on a progressive computer monitor, normally a deinterlacing software player is used. Most computers or retail DVD ROM players come packaged with a deinterlacing software player (usually Power DVD or WinDVD). Other players like VLC can be dowloaded free.

    Some software players can access a hardware deinterlacer on the video display card. Quality varies.

    For example, to play your DV-AVI directly, install VLC and select "Video", then "deinterlace", then try "linear" first then try the other methods. You can set deinterlace defaults in "Tools" "Preferences".
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  5. Member netmask56's Avatar
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    Any chance of capturing the file as MPEG2? If so you could run it through ProjectX using the demux option which cleans up errors in the video a bit. You would then have to remux the streams together again. I've down this with my historic VHS collection and got good results when you consider the resolution of VHS.
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  6. Member edDV's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by netmask56
    Any chance of capturing the file as MPEG2? If so you could run it through ProjectX using the demux option which cleans up errors in the video a bit. You would then have to remux the streams together again. I've down this with my historic VHS collection and got good results when you consider the resolution of VHS.
    You can do a separate software deinterlace for computer monitor or personal device display but keep the original interlace for best playback on a good TV. Hardware deinterlacers do better quality and get better each TV generation. For the future you will want the preserve the interlace version.
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  7. can MPEG be captured as the format when using a DV Camera?

    Hardware wise, im playing it back on a Panasonic DMREH67 and through a Onkyo 605 via HDMI into a 1080p LCD. I still see lines.
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  8. Member edDV's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by HamishT
    can MPEG be captured as the format when using a DV Camera?

    Hardware wise, im playing it back on a Panasonic DMREH67 and through a Onkyo 605 via HDMI into a 1080p LCD. I still see lines.
    Check to see if the DMREH67 has a pass through mode (no tape). Otherwise you would need to record first to DV tape, then play back to firewire.
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