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  1. Member
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    Jun 2009
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    New Zealand
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    Hi first post here.

    I have this Panasonic NV-GS50 that has been in the cupboard for a few years and when I pulled it out yesterday I was able to hook it up and download some tapes that had been recorded but when i went to use the camera again there was no video.

    I know the LCD is working because I played back the tapes in it.

    When I record with the camera it records the audio but no video. There is nothing showing on the LCD or in the viewfinder, Just the menu words that show up normally, and darkness.

    No, I didn't have the lens cap still on

    I don't know if it is a setting in the camera or not but I have tried everything I know of. I was about to put it in to be fixed but thought I would try here incase anyone else has had this and there is a simple solution that I would have paid an arm and a leg for.

    Alternatively, is there a test or something I can check that will tell me it is a problem that needs to be fixed?

    Any help is appreciated.

    Thanks
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  2. Member edDV's Avatar
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    Mar 2004
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    Northern California, USA
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    Try a firmware reset. Look for a reset function in the menus (e.g. restore defaults).

    If that doesn't work, remove the watch like "cmos" battery and let the RAM drain overnight to a few days. Then replace with a new battery.
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  3. Member
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    Originally Posted by edDV
    remove the watch like "cmos" battery and let the RAM drain overnight to a few days. Then replace with a new battery.
    I didnt even know it had one of these?

    Where would they keep it?
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  4. Member fitch.j's Avatar
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    May 2009
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    United Kingdom
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    I've got an old canon that i use from time to time that did something very similar. However leaving it on and just waiting while it "warms up" (sometimes for upto 10 minutes) had it working. I have no idea what it was/is doing when it does that, but as i only give it out to a couple of students maybe once every 2 months i havent really bothered looking into it. I dont know if your problem is the same, but all the symptons you mention match so maybe just turn it on and leave it for 20 mins and see if it springs into life.
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  5. Member edDV's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by CrazyBugga
    Originally Posted by edDV
    remove the watch like "cmos" battery and let the RAM drain overnight to a few days. Then replace with a new battery.
    I didnt even know it had one of these?

    Where would they keep it?
    Check the manual. The small battery holds the settings and must be removerd for a cold boot of the processor. Most camcorders have these.
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  6. Member
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    Nothing in the manual about that battery.

    I have seen ion other sites a lot of people complaining of same problem with this model. Must be a problem with it. Unfortunately no fixes posted anywhere though
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  7. the little batteries are sometimes under a small screwed down cover under the main removable battery. other times in the lcd screen compartment.
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  8. Member
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    Dec 2005
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    Another thing that can happen is the shutter mechanism can get stuck. Everything will work, except the picture will be completely black.

    Many of these types of cameras use a small shield mechanism controlled by a motor to regulate the amount of light reaching the CMOS sensor. The motor used to control this shield is very small and low on torque. If it sticks, which can happen from the camera sitting around for a while, the motor may not have enough torque to break it free. Likewise, if the motor is burned out, the shutter will not open. The shutter mechanism is weighted/spring-loaded to close, so the motor is required to open it. It also seems like a lot of cameras don't throw an error code when the stuck condition occurs. The result is exactly what you describe -- black picture and no error code.

    Several varieties of camcorders are known to have this problem -- either sticking or motor failure. I scored a nice Samsung miniDV from eBay for less than 10 bucks because of this problem. I knew that I was only going to use the camera in nightshot mode, so I disabled the shutter completely (always open) and everything worked.

    Assuming you're not interested in taking your camcorder apart (and it is typically not for the faint of heart or for the inexperienced) and the battery reset trick doesn't work you could try a little *careful* "percussive maintenance"... No -- do not smash the camera with a sledge hammer. Instead, try powering the unit on in camera mode with the lens cap ON and no tape in the mechanism. In other words, give it a dark subject so that it will attempt to open the shutter all the way. Using ONE finger -- your index finger -- gently tap on the camera at or around the base of the lens assembly. Don't tap on the lens itself, just around the area where it enters the camera. Hold your index finger straight and use the motion that one would use to "scold" someone. Remove the lens cap and repeat if you don't have picture.

    Some caveats:

    * Gentle! You're not trying to score a knockout punch. You're trying to create enough vibration reaching the shutter pivot mechanism to break it free if it is stuck.

    * Don't wait forever after powering on. Some cameras apparently give up on the shutter after a few moments of not having control. Power on, tap, and test in fairly quick succession.

    * Try it several times.

    * Try it from different camera orientations on the lens axis. In other words, try it with the camera in a position that would produce an upside down picture of your subject, etc.

    * If the shutter motor is burned out or the CMOS sensor is bad, this won't help your problem at all (sorry!).

    * If you DO get it to work using this trick, be aware that it may have a propensity to stick in the future.

    * If you DO get it to work, don't power down and stick it back in the drawer right away. Exercise it a bit -- specifically going from light to dark over and over again. This will force the motor/mechanism to move the shutter, hopefully clearing out whatever was producing the friction to make it stick in the first place.


    And, of course, the normal disclaimer applies... Your mileage may vary... And, if you do not feel comfortable with this, don't try it! Overly aggressive tapping can cause other problems in the unit, which is not the intent.
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  9. Member
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    Usually the aperture is stuck. Dismantle and clean to get it free-running (very fiddly!) unless it is the actuator which has failed (rarer), which will need replacing.
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