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  1. I am a newbie to converting DVD. Researching the various tools used in converting DVDs to a format compatible with a device such as a mobile phone I see many programs on conversion and some on decryption. I then came across notices about legal matters and the conversion of copyrighted DVD movies to devices like a mobile phone or other mp4 video players. Can someone tell me what is legal and what is not legal when it comes to converting a DVD movie onto a device such as a mobile phone or similar device? Is it legal to use the various software programs out there to decrypt and convert (like DVDFab)? I like the idea of watching a movie on my mobile phone, but I don't want to be violating any laws to do so. All feedback on this question is most appreciated.
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  2. Member
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    Laws vary from country to country.
    you may try to google fairuse and your country.
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  3. Thanks very much. I am referring to laws in the United States. Thanks again!
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  4. The DMCA made circumventing digital encryption illegal in the USA.
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  5. Member
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    Northern Pacific SW
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    Your questions are unanswerable. No one can give you legal advice except a lawyer who would charge for it. Even then it would just be an opinion. A court could hold differently.

    We are all probably in violation of dozens of laws just sitting at our desks, typing. There are too many laws for anyone to know them all - and - they are all subject to interpretation.

    There are exceptions to the DMCA and it has not been closely examined by the higher courts. It is so broadly written that some fear that it effectively outlaws all cryptographic research.

    As a practical matter, listening to music on my phone kills my battery in about 25 min. I only use my cell for calls, not as a media player. My battery will last about three days if I just use it as a phone.
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  6. Banned
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    I second what dLee said. If you really and truly "don't want to be violating any laws to do so" then you don't need to do what you propose. That is the bottom line. If you do nothing, you are safe.

    Some courts might agree that you do have the right to convert DVDs that you bought for use on your phone. Some might not. Then you or the MPAA could always appeal and get the ruling reversed and move further up the appeal courts. I am unaware of any cases where a single individual was prosecuted for converting a DVD he bought for use on a phone. Honestly, the MPAA would probably not want to prosecute you, even though they might claim that what you are doing is illegal (and it probably does violate the DCMA as jagabo says, but a court might rule that it is OK anyway) because if they lose, they would not want to set a precedent.

    Look, companies claim all the time that "You can't do this", "You can't do that", etc. and sometimes you can. There was a recent court case where some software company claimed that an Ebay seller who was selling old copies of the software was acting illegally because they (the company) did not allow for their software to be re-sold and their license said so. The court said basically "Too bad, so sad. It's legal." My best friend is a lawyer and I learned a long time ago from him that NOTHING in the law is clear cut and just because someone says you can't legally do something, that doesn't necessarily mean you can't legally do it.
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  7. Member lacywest's Avatar
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    This website does try very hard to stay online ... we cant give you advice on how to rip a DVD that you dont own. If you own the DVD video ... you bought it and play it on your equipment ... I really dont see the harm in watching it on your cell phone or other device. But if you take that video and put it on another person's cell phone or ipod ... that is illegal. Especially if they walk out your front door of your home and still have it loaded on their equipment ... that is a no no.
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  8. Thanks for all the feedback. And I understand no one can give me legal advise except for an attorney. I was just wanting to better understand the legal boundaries in this area. I see many products advertised for putting DVDs on a wide variety of mobile devices. Lacywest's feedback makes sense to me, but I realize it is always up for interpretation. Again, thanks for the feedback.
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  9. Originally Posted by dzachau
    I see many products advertised for putting DVDs on a wide variety of mobile devices.
    If those are commercial products sold in the USA you will find that they cannot decrypt commercial DVDs.
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  10. Member
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    In general, I think lacywest has it right, but I think one point needs clarification:

    Originally Posted by lacywest
    But if you take that video and put it on another person's cell phone or ipod ... that is illegal.
    I don't think that it's illegal, i.e. a crime. It might be copyright infringement which is a tort. Copyright infringement is not theft because no one is actually deprived of their property.
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  11. Buy movies that have digital copies, then transferring them to your mobile will be easier and legal.

    Amazon has 144 results for movies with digital copies. http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_d?url=search-alias%3Ddvd&field-keywords=digital+copy
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  12. Thanks Mrswla!! I had never seen this Amazon page! I will give it a try. Again, thanks to you all for addressing my question. As always VideoHelp is a fantastic resource!
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