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  1. Member
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    Hello Guyes,
    I've converted 1 DVD file to VCD(.mpeg) & it's compressed to 1.1 GB. I want to write that file in q VCD disk, so I need to compress that file to 700MB. Is there any reliable free software which will compress .mpeg file fit to 1 vcd - like DVDShrink?
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  2. I'm a MEGA Super Moderator Baldrick's Avatar
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    VCD has a fixed size so you must make "xVCD". Use for example Eazy VCD.
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  3. if you need vcd spec, you'll need to cut the file in half and make 2 vcds. like baldrick said vcd has a constant bitrate and can't be compressed.
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  4. VCD spec is 70 minutes per 700 Meg CD. Anything else such as xVCD will be really poor quality and not be as compatible. Just for the heck of it I looked at what xVCD can produce. It didn't Fast Forward or Fast Rewind properly nor di it look good even on a cheap SD tv set. Since you seem to have a 110 minute video squeezing it into 70 minutes worth of space will be a big hit in quality.

    However if you must then go back and start with the original DVD.

    Are DVDs that much more expensive than CD media where you are? This past weekend 50 Verbatim CDs were $9.99 and Verbatim DVDs were $12.99 so for $3.00 you could get 6+ times the storage. (700 Megabyte vs 4.36Gb) roughly. Then since VCD has no error correction........
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    I won't presume to tell you whether or not the result will be of a quality acceptable to you -- only you can make that determination for yourself. It's easy enough to try it and see. By far the best tool for doing what you want is EazyVCD. It is completely free, very easy to use (as its name suggests -- it goes from DVD to XVCD in nearly one mouse click), and its MPEG1 encoder is about as good as it gets. With suitably lowered expectations, you can squeeze ~2 hours of VHS-ish quality video on a single CD. I have done this many times now, with results that are best described as "watchable on an airplane" (which is exactly what I've done this for in the past). If you're basically happy with the VCDs that are commonly found throughout Asia, then this may be perfectly fine. As I say, it's easy for you to try it and make your own decision. If you don't like the result, split it into two discs, or use a more modern codec, like XviD (or even h264) to obtain higher quality in a smaller filesize.

    [I know your original question was about how to shrink an existing MPEG1 file, but if you have the original DVD, start with that. Although you can recompress the MPEG1, you're now compounding the degradation in quality. If you're hell-bent on doing that anyway, you can use TMPGENC. It is free for MPEG1 operations.]
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  6. Member
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    Hi guyes,
    Thanks for all the replys.
    Actually it's not the matter of cost. Here dvd & vcd are same in price. 1 of my friend ask me its possible or not & I wanted to know this information also.
    Any way, I will try with eazyVCD, but is xVCD support VDC? I mean is it layble wit VCD all player?
    Thanks...
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  7. Originally Posted by akakiami
    is xVCD support VDC? I mean is it layble wit VCD all player?
    xVCD is not an official specification. It just means a VCD that is out of spec. They will play in some players, not in others. The more out of spec the xVCD the more problems you will have.
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  8. Banned
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    VCD players in your part of the world are notorious for refusing to play VCDs that don't adhere exactly to the standards. xVCD does NOT adhere to the standards. In fact, we get a lot of reports from people in India and Pakistan who are completely unable to make VCDs themselves that their players will play. If you have a VCD only player, you can try this, but most likely it won't work. DVD players that also play VCDs probably will play these discs, but it's not a guarantee.
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  9. Member
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    My own experience has been a little less discouraging than jman98's. I find that XVCDs made by EazyVCD have few playback problems in Asian players made in the last several years, as long as the bitrates are below VCD's rates. Ones authored by ffmpegx don't play well, if at all. I have cranked out a great many for my Indian and Chinese friends, and showed them how to do this as well. I have had very few reports of problems with XVCD playback from EazyVCD-produced discs.

    VCD's spec a maximum video BR; it needs to be CBR, and there is a finite selection of compliant resolutions and audio bitrates. The XVCDs produced by EazyVCD actually comply pretty well with these limitations. I have an old VCD-only player from Taiwan that I use as a poor-man's compliance tester. It is the fussiest player I own, and it handles these discs just fine. It absolutely pukes on the output of ffmpegx.

    Curiously, if I demux the mpeg file produced by ffmpegx, and remux/reauthor on a Windows machine, using TMPGENC and VCDeasy tools, all is well.
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  10. You don't find that the quality is a little poor? VCDs looked good until I bought a HDTV. I did in fact stop using VCds some years ago shortly after the Sony DRU500a came out, except for changing the audio and putting them on DVDs for the menu & chaptering of ones I already had done.

    If I were one of those if it ain't HD I ain't watching it types that are around I would have thrown them out. Given that I watch SD a lot for content not available in HD I can watch VCDs too. I have been slowly recapturing where possible in better quality or re-ripping my DVDs so that the copy is in the changer.

    One reason I stopped making VCDs or 352 by 240 DVDs was I knew that sooner or later I'd have a HDTV as a result of the mandated changeover here in the USA. SO I started working for quality not to save penny's on blanks. That is one of the reasons I picked up the Philips DVD recorder that can tune Digital channels, I can now make better looking standard resolution DVDs from the HD local channels as compared to last year when I got them via the SD channels. When I play them in the upconverting DVD player they fill the screen and still look good. I could get a HDTV tuner for the for the computer and go that route, I just need one that can tune the QAM channels, OTOH the DVD recorder is much easier.
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  11. Member
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    Originally Posted by TBoneit
    You don't find that the quality is a little poor?
    Of course I do (indeed, I have a stack of HK action movies that are so badly authored that they look like telecines of film that was first passed through the digestive tract of a sick yak, and then treated poorly). But that's not the point. As my post said, he should just try it and see for himself. If it sucks to his eyes, then he'll need to do something else. In the meantime, I'll do the best I can to answer his original question.
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  12. That good?
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  13. Member
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    Sometimes, not even that good.
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