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  1. Member
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    Aug 2008
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    Any suggestions or tutorial links are very much appreciated. I'm going to be recording some football games and upload them to my computer. From there I would like to edit them, adding a box score at the top or bottom of the screen and a game clock & possibly a play clock. Does anyone know any programs that I could do this with and how to do it?
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  2. Banned
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    beautiful
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    "Inserting the clock" is no diffrent than inserting any other images to the video. Obviously you need to reencode the video to do that.
    As for automatic this process (since the clock gotta be animated) I remember using timecode plugin that virtually worked as a clock on some sport video I made ages ago using Adobe Premiere.
    I have also used subtitles for the same purpose too (some quick'n'dirty "trick" isn't it, hehe)
    But if you want to have some "real clock" like tv broadcasts do, you either have to do it yourself, or find some software that comes with it...
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  3. Member
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    As Derex888 said, the Timecode object in Adobe Premier will do. It is more like a time counter (same as what you see in some screener dvds) than a clock. But would be the easiest solution (2 second job) - in Premier, drag and drop the timecode object onto your video.

    With the scoreboard, depends on how fancy you want to do it. For something with a nice 3D background or overlay, create the graphics Photoshop and import into Premier.

    Alternatively, in Premier create new "title" to overlay the score-card on top of the video. Because the scores are likely to change as the match progresses, you might have to create a few titles to reflect the change.
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  4. Member
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    thanks for the tips guys, im gonna give that a shot
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  5. Banned
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    FWIW:
    if you want to keep your original video stream / don't want to reencode it/ , or don't need any fancy displays, you should consider my advice about using subtitles for this purpose.
    I was really very pleased with the result myself, and it took a fracture of time you'd need when using Premiere, since all you need to do is write your "subtitle" with the timecodes/scoreboards and add it to the stream using some appropiate font (I found cool one on the web AFAIR, the digits looked like those old LED display).
    I did it "by mistake" because my old Premiere didn't want to work on XP SP2 at wwork when I was trying to quick-edit friend's home video (his kid's team game), so I figured I'll use subtitles, specially that subtitles can be controlled up to 1 frame (which is a 1/24th or 1/25th or 1/30th of the second, depending on your video) and it was accurate enough for my purpose
    I have created text "subtitles" (the clock, and occasional extra subtitle lines with scores) using Subtitle Workshop, and I added it to videostream using one of the "dvd recoders/rebuilders" that accepted text (.SRT) subtitles, don't remember now which one, but some freeware (Im not sure now, but I think it was DVD2SVCD). It took my maybe 20 minutes to complete this work, and the extra "bonus" of using subtitles for timecode/scores was that it could have been turned on/off at any time
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  6. Earlier this year, I helped a client develop a system using our Enosoft DV Processor for displaying times and lane splits for some national swimming competitions. The live video from a camera was fed into a laptop, processed (i.e., add the times) and projected on a large display for the crowd.

    A continuous clock ran from the start of the race and at the end of each length, the split times for each swimmer were displayed.

    Either a live feed from a DV camcorder or pre-existing DV format files (raw or AVI) are needed.
    John Miller
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