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  1. any buy guides on this site for obtaining an external tbc and a quality capture card. I don't have access to a an AGP interface. I have an asus p8z77-v board with the following expansion slots: 2 x PCIe 3.0/2.0 x16 (x16 or dual x8), 1 x PCIe 2.0 x16 (x4 mode, black), 2 x PCIe 2.0 x1, 2 x PCI

    I also have another pc with a z87-pro mobo having the following expansion slots:2 x PCIe 3.0/2.0 x16 (x16 or dual x8), 1 x PCIe 2.0 x16 (x4 mode), 4 x PCIe 2.0 x1.
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  2. Hello all. I'm trying to find a PAL equivalent of the amazing JVC SR-W5U. quite possibly the finest NTSC VHS player ever made (I own two). I've bought a few of the Panasonic machines recommended, but haven't been satisfied. One poster mentioned he thought the Panasonic AG-7750 S-VHS was a very close PAL equivalent. Can people share their experiences with this machine if they've used it? I have a Panasonic NV-HS950, which is a pretty good machine, but the level of grain is annoying. I've tried capturing with the noise reduction feature on, but was unhappy with the loss of detail, and it didn't improve the grain much anyway IMO. I thought about getting the Panny NV-HS1000. Will it be the same as the NV-950, better, worse? Some people rate it as superior to the NV-FS200. I'm keen to hear people's experiences. Thanks for reading.
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  3. Member
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    Originally Posted by astronob View Post
    Hello all. I'm trying to find a PAL equivalent of the amazing JVC SR-W5U. quite possibly the finest NTSC VHS player ever made (I own two). I've bought a few of the Panasonic machines recommended, but haven't been satisfied. One poster mentioned he thought the Panasonic AG-7750 S-VHS was a very close PAL equivalent. Can people share their experiences with this machine if they've used it? I have a Panasonic NV-HS950, which is a pretty good machine, but the level of grain is annoying. I've tried capturing with the noise reduction feature on, but was unhappy with the loss of detail, and it didn't improve the grain much anyway IMO. I thought about getting the Panny NV-HS1000. Will it be the same as the NV-950, better, worse? Some people rate it as superior to the NV-FS200. I'm keen to hear people's experiences. Thanks for reading.
    I have all the Panasonics. When you see grain, that grain is part of the recording. I have proved that when recording onto a fresh, good quality VHS tape the NV-HS950 has barely any grain when playing its own recording back. Since the grain is usually high frequency noise then reducing the sharpness will automatically reduce the grain - but at a loss of acuity. The HS950 was designed to play tapes with maximum detail available - and it does that as well as I have ever seen. On good tapes it really shines. The NR is not going to touch the 'grain' because that is part of the recording - what it does is eliminate chroma noise which is an error.

    I would say for what you want the NV-HS200 would be best as it has a sharpness slider which goes from no sharpening upwards. Some grainy tapes need no sharpening or the encoders get upset. The HS1000 can be better on some material but it does not like old/shedding tapes as the heads are very fine and tend to block. I have a top tier DigiPure/TBC JVC but from my tests the JVC scrubs away fine detail along with the noise. This may not be obvious to some but I don't like the loss of detail when I know it is on the tape. I don't like how eyes are made smudgy by the JVC's.
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  4. I agree with Quasipal. The fact that the JVC captures with less grain is evidence of the picture being softened and filtered - of detail being removed. Some prefer that 'look' but not I. The Panasonic captures show what's on the tape as accurately as possible, as long as you keep the DNR turned off and the sharpening under control. I turn the sharpening completely off. The grain can be lessened or removed later on with good AviSynth temporal filters. I own a Panasonic PAL NV-HS860.
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    Speaking of the AG-7750... I have one of those as well as a JVC HR-S3500. I sold my 9500 a long time ago.

    My family wants me to digitize some home videos. Some are extremely old, from a VHS camcorder in the early 80s. I don't know if they were recorded SP, EP. or SLP.

    I plan to capture uncrompressed and then encode to h264, after some filters.

    I think the AG-7750 would work fine. Should I consider getting a AG-1980 since they play the EP and SLP better?

    or perhaps a HR-S9900 or HM-DH40000U?

    I own a Canopus ADVC-110, Monster Video S-Video Cables (also vampire wire S-Video), and Sony Vegas Pro 8...

    I was contemplating getting the Neat Video plugin too.

    Should I get another VCR? and/or upgrade other things?

    Thanks in advance!
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  6. Hi, I was wondering if the Mitsubishi HS-HD2000U D-VHS , SVHS VCR Has High playback quality? Also, can I hook it up to a DVD Recorder,
    (Toshiba R-410) through the (4 pin) Firewire, DV, IEEE 1394 Cable, to record on to a DVD? Or is JVC decks better playback quality?
    I have an AG 1980, Not that happy with the picture...Any help would be great. Thank you!
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  7. Mod Neophyte Super Moderator redwudz's Avatar
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    lan2234, Do not post the same topic on several forums.
    Please do not cross post, once is enough.

    Please read our rules before posting. Continued cross posting will get you banned.

    Moderator redwudz
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  8. Member vhelp's Avatar
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    Now, before this puppy develops any age problems I'll be capturing VHS like a bandit for a few weeks. Still have 200 hours of old VHS to go. As backup I acquired a Panny PV-S4670 and a PV-S4672 during the past few months.
    .
    .
    The Panasonic PV-S4670, PV-S4672 and super-rare PV-S4680 are quite nice: usually inexpensive second-hand. The trouble is finding them now: the good ones Samlyn located are circa 1995-1996, near-top of the line models. But those model numbers were recycled twice after that, for far lesser VCRs, so be careful to check the mfr date on the back panels of any eBay or Craigs List prospects.
    I know this is an old discussion. But I feel it still contributes to it in some way.

    I got lucky on a good deal, by chance and timing, for a Panasonic PV-S4670. When I made my first capture from it, I was sold, and for a brief moment, I thought I had a close contender to the JVC SR-W5U. That was my first impression. I thought to myself, who would hold back knowledge of its picture quality and keep it from us? From that moment on, I was capturing a hand full or so, of tapes. Then, after some time, I started realizing that the quality varies from different types of tapes. Mainly, (and number one), if the tapes are commercial movies. And, if the tape was "digitally mastered" the quality was, imho, crisp and clean. Of course, the mileage varies dependent upon the capture equipment and cable quality. I was working on upgrading my cables to Belden, but I never received the four that I thought I had ordered, but instead, I received a 4 meter long cable (single cable) and not even any phono (RCA) plugs or tips. So that was a waist and will probably go in the garbage, and will have to search again, later. Anyway. As for the quality that comes out of this model, I can only say that good usage can only come from tapes that are commercial grade. You know..., movies. Not home-video and personal videos. This is strictly a commercial tape respecter. Don't get it for anything else except for commercial movies. The alignment and image perfection is based on the quality of commercial tapes that are produced in professional manufacturing sites that produces these type of tapes.

    If coupled with the right capture card, cables, and the vcr tracking is excellent (like it is in this one), then this combo makes great quality crip videos from commercial tapes, and ready for AVC or HEVC destination format for archival or viewing pleasure.

    So, early last week, I was still in the testing phase when all of the sudden, the vcr began having problems. The screen would go black. Long story short, the tape wheel was not moving. It was like someone was pressing on the wheel, preventing from turning. I found that out when I opened the top cover and observed the process, from tape insert to play to eject. When I first insert a tape, the unit engages the tape, and pulls in the tape onto the drum and begin playing and the video is displaying. No distortion. But I can hear a thumping or woofing sound and when I looked closer at the tape wheel, I could see the wheel hesitating as it was turning, and sometimes stop and go and stop and finally the screen goes blank and their is a noticeable slack of tape seen, as if bulging between the drum and center of the tape system. At that moment, I pressed stop and then eject. Luckily, there was not much tape slack, so the ejection process was enough to rewind those few inches of tape slack back into the tape cartridge as it ejected the tape.

    Its been over a week and I miss this vcr. If there is any way I can fix this, first to find out the exact cause of it (could be lacking oil or something else that simple) I would like to try and fix it myself. I believe that this unit is worth fixing if I can do it myself.

    Of course, if there is a comparable model to this one that produces similar (or same) picture quality, I will definitely give those models a try. Until then, I will continue in my endeavors.
    Last edited by vhelp; 1st Nov 2016 at 19:45.
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  9. If your 4670 proves unrepairable, you should be able to get similar performance from any consumer Panasonic model mfr'd between 1992 and 1996 that has a DynaMorphus Metal Heads logo on the front panel. During that period, all Panasonics combined the DynaMorphous feature with the upgraded video circuits (a blessing or a curse depending on one's tapes). Avoid the 1992 models with front panel flaps: these were a trainwreck, unusual for Panasonic, and very difficult to find in functional condition today. 45xx and 46xx are a better bet.

    I'm surprised you found the PV-S4670 usable in your work, vhelp: that series tends to have significant issues with twitchy color due to the noise reduction system conflicting with the tracking system. I remember this was somewhat tape-dependent, so perhaps if your use is confined to near-perfect commercial releases you might not be impacted as much. I found it almost impossible to make practical use of it with my wide variety of home-recorded tapes when I bought one new back in 1995, so I exchanged it for its entry-level cousin specifically because that model did not include the crazy color circuit.

    Yet, its such a nice little VCR, isn't it? Despite knowing its problems, I couldn't resist buying another for nostalgia's sake a few years back on eBay (when I found a rare 4680 mint in original box for only $40 shipped). The 46xx series was very reliable, and the operational feel was great: they're the epitome of vintage Panasonic ergonomics. The DynaMorphous heads add a little extra kick to recording quality, and the flying erase head (exclusive to the 4680) makes editing a pleasure. Unfortunately, I very quickly discovered the Achilles Heel color noise reduction circuit is just as troublesome now as it was 20 years ago, so I can't really rely on it to make digital transfers. The color shimmers and flickers like crazy every few seconds as tracking drifts ever so slightly: this is impossible to fully dial out via manual tracking override, although I can reduce it slightly.

    The Panasonic 46xx series can be recommended without hesitation for "daily driver" use: most can also be employed for digital transfers if matched with appropriate tapes. But the top three models, identified by their DynaMorphous Metal Heads logo, can be a headache when their color tracking system flakes. 4670 and 4680 are worth a spin if you can get one at a good price, but immediately test them with a wide sampling of your tape collection: they are not nearly as compatible as the "lesser" non-DynaMorphous models. Further discussion can be found on a dedicated 4680 thread from last summer.
    Last edited by orsetto; 1st Nov 2016 at 23:18.
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  10. As I noted in that thread, I found that the picture was always smoothed-over so I don't know how you managed to get "crisp" video.
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  11. Originally Posted by lordsmurf View Post
    Originally Posted by danno78
    Pal Panasonic consumer models with TBC and DNR from older to the last model built:
    Panasonic NV-FS 200, made before 1993
    Panasonic NV-HS 1000, made before 1993, lack true DNR. Instead has CVC (Crystal Viev Control = automatic control of the details=automatic sharpness control) Has built in editing controler
    Panasonic NV-HS 950, 1993
    Panasonic NV-HS 860, made in 2000 or 2001, S-VHS ET
    Panasonic NV-HS 930, made in 2000 or 2001, S-VHS ET
    Panasonic NV-HS 960, made in 2000 or 2001, S-VHS ET
    Panasonic NV-SV 121, made after 860, 930, 960 series, S-VHS ET, last model built by Panasonic with TBC and DNR
    ____I have three AG 4700 stations sold, the head does not seem to be the original is VXP1747. VC looks like there is no clear standard out (only AI). VHS machine HD100(1989) have CVC, I compared the dealer video shooting: HD300(1992).HD550(1994) good, compared to China's Dalian HD630, FJ630. CVC My opinion is: There is a jelly color.————There is no CVC function on AG 4700, I hope you can add the evidence.They have three picture tube characteristics: the feeling of light emitted from the monitor, I use the 16bit EIZO LCD also have this feeling.


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  12. Originally Posted by orsetto View Post
    Originally Posted by sanlyn View Post
    The other exception is the AG-2560, but current listings on eBay are just too cheap to look reliable IMO.
    The AG-2560 is among the most obscure models Panasonic ever sold, almost no one knows about it who wasn't a purchasing agent for office or kiosk A/V gear in 2001. Inevitably they all have missing remotes as well, not a big deal but it dissuades the casual shopper who doesn't already have an old Panasonic or universal remote. So the 2560 is almost always available for $25-45 on eBay (they do typically nail you another $20 on the shipping). The older AG2550 is near-identical but has much poorer HiFi and SLP tracking (the reasons why they made a 2560). The rarer, later AG-2570 and AG-2580 were JVC products, OEM'd for Panasonic: people with just enough knowledge to outfox themselves recognize the JVC appearance and think they're getting some sort of bargain (esp on the AG-2580, which looks exactly like a JVC SR-V101). This drives the asking prices of 2570 and 2580 to above $80, but they aren't worth that: despite appearances, they are not exact equivalents to similar JVC models (they don't include the coveted TBC/DNR of the SR-V101, etc). The AG2560 is the best of the four, a really well-built no-frills VCR with exceptional good tracking in hifi and a reasonably good video presentation.
    ——AG-2560=HD550 SVHS (TBC) The HD550 now sold in China is the last generation imported from Japan. I also consider buying this machine, in addition to no TBC, it is perfect. Finally I bought the very new AG 4700 at the same price, hoping it had the same CVC, jelly color as the AG-2560 (HD550).
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  13. mr.
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    Originally Posted by orsetto View Post
    Only one missing is the Mitsubishi HS-HD2000U DVHS, which has all the TBC, DNR, Calibration, Picture Modes and 3D Y-C filters seen on the top recommended JVC SVHS and DVHS models. Great unit for archiving VHS to DVD.

    The JVC DVHS models are newer than most of their SVHS units, have the same TBC/DNR/Filters, and are often a better buy: but I recommend avoiding the ones with five digit model numbers, they have known overheating issues and noisy fans. The newest JVC DVHS units with three-digit model numbers have proven more reliable: the JVC DVHS model HM-DH30000U should be probably be avoided for sure and the HM-HD40000U may not be much better, look for the most recent model SR-VD400U instead. (In Europe/Asia, the very early HM-DR10000EK seems to have been better built than the 30000 and 40000 and may be a good choice for members in those regions.)
    DVHS are very rare to find, and is a system that died before it could become something, because beter digital player/recording options became available.
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  14. Originally Posted by Eric-jan View Post
    DVHS are very rare to find, and is a system that died before it could become something, because beter digital player/recording options became available.
    No one interested in this topic ever really cared about the "digital" part of "DVHS". The point is, they were also premium analog decks with TBC/DNR features similar to the older SVHS models from JVC. They also had somewhat more stable mechanical tape transports. Being 5 to 15 years newer than the most popular premium SVHS models, and much less likely to have been heavily used, they can be good alternative VCRs for playing analog VHS into digital capture devices. DVHS models had limited distribution, but are worth considering if you happen to live in a country where they were sold in any quantity. You might not have seen them in Netherlands, but JVC offered a surprisingly large number of DVHS models in North America, UK and Japan for several years.
    Last edited by orsetto; 20th Sep 2018 at 01:52.
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  15. mr.
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    And still my point is valid they are rare.
    Last edited by Eric-jan; 20th Sep 2018 at 01:59.
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  16. Originally Posted by Eric-jan View Post
    And still my point is valid they are rare.
    It is not so easy finding a properly functional JVC or Panasonic SVHS anymore, either: in a practical sense, they are as "rare" as a DVHS unit. Lets just agree, anyone looking for a usable premium VCR of any format (VHS, SVHS, DVHS, BetaMax, 8mm, MiniDV) as we approach 2019 is facing a challenge.
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  17. mr.
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    I still see some for sale on amazon there's also a Dutch webshop sells on Amazon/eBay, my guess is also people who have done their collection of tapes, will not need their VCR anymore, and sell it, still got a JVC HR-S8960 that has some nice features , but also has some artifacts my Panasonic DMR ES35V doesn't have, and then again, the Panasonic has component yuv video out, which i use for capture, is not S-VHS and the JVC is S-VHS but has no component output
    It will never be good enough, or it's rare sofar i'm happy with my Panasonic, because i can capture my tapes in progressive mode, and when the recodings are good, there's very little to do in post.

    btw. most old recordings were not yet in S-VHS recorded, only advantage will be that the S-VHS will give better playback due to build and electronics, but this is not always so.
    Last edited by Eric-jan; 20th Sep 2018 at 03:23. Reason: improvements
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    Can anyone explain what the differences between the JVC SR-TS1U is and the JVC HR-S 9800 from the same time frame? It looks like the pro unit doesn't have the dynamic drum or any of the TBC DNR features. But I cannot confirm? Anyone really know? And is the transport on the TS1U more stable then the 9800, which has been known to crease tapes on EP speed?
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    Originally Posted by braxus View Post
    Can anyone explain what the differences between the JVC SR-TS1U is and the JVC HR-S 9800 from the same time frame? It looks like the pro unit doesn't have the dynamic drum or any of the TBC DNR features. But I cannot confirm? Anyone really know? And is the transport on the TS1U more stable then the 9800, which has been known to crease tapes on EP speed?
    No TBC.

    I highly doubt that specific transport is better than the 9800. Some SRs are, or rather can be (condition is king!), but the 9800 is no wimp.

    Originally Posted by orsetto View Post
    They also had somewhat more stable mechanical tape transports.
    I've never thought that of D-VHS decks.
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  20. Originally Posted by lordsmurf View Post

    Originally Posted by orsetto View Post
    They also had somewhat more stable mechanical tape transports.
    I've never thought that of D-VHS decks.
    You've also never beaten your head into a bloody pulp against a brick wall after buying and getting screwed over by one dysfunctional worn-out second-hand "premium" JVC SVHS after another after another after another after another after another after another.

    Its the dawn of 2019: nobody but you is getting within a nautical mile of a flawlessly functioning example of the classic JVC SVHS decks you favor. In the current second-hand market, most of the premium classic SVHS (both JVC and Panasonic) are shot completely to hell. Compared to them, a newer DVHS from JVC (or especially Mitsubishi) will indeed have 'more stable' transports, as well as 'more stable' electronics, loaders, PSUs, buttons, displays. They're far less likely to have been shipped and slammed and banged on by a dozen or more previous owners. That 'newer' advantage is fading even for the final SVHS and DVHS models- passing time does none of these machines any favors, and good VCR techs are unicorns now.

    Like you say, "condition is everything". I'll take an SVHS over a DVHS if its been fully reconditioned by a skilled tech with documented proof, otherwise if starting from scratch today with random VCRs of unknown provenance I'd be more comfortable gambling on a DVHS. Your mileage, budget, and risk tolerance may vary.
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  21. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by orsetto View Post
    Its the dawn of 2019: nobody but you is getting within a nautical mile of a flawlessly functioning example of the classic JVC SVHS decks you favor. In the current second-hand market, most of the premium classic SVHS (both JVC and Panasonic) are shot completely to hell. Compared to them, a newer DVHS from JVC (or especially Mitsubishi) will indeed have 'more stable' transports, as well as 'more stable' electronics, loaders, PSUs, buttons, displays.
    Huh?

    D-VHS came out in 1998, and all the suggested S-VHS decks go back to 1995. So D-VHS decks are about 15-20 years old now, 10 at best, sames as the S-VHS decks.

    And D-VHS decks are actually more likely to be abused, having NOT been pro/semi-pro machines. Those were for rich consumers, people who knew nothing about video care/maintenance, unlike most S-VHS owners. Remember, D-VHS had retail movie release tapes, something not found on S-VHS since the 80s. The major push for D-VHS was "DVD quality on tape", something the professional market had zero use for, and was seen as a fad a mile away.

    S-VHS had heavily been for recording, then playback in the digital age, and JVC knew this. On the other hand, D-VHS decks are not tuned to playing back VHS or S-VHS tapes in the same way as S-VHS. The tracking ranges are often weak, often good for SP only. You'll have to open the deck and tweak guides for better tracking performance. The transports are not any better than S-VHS, and some S-VHS models are vastly superior to any D-VHS.

    D-VHS decks have not aged well. I rarely see a good D-VHS deck anymore, but have seen a number of good S-VHS decks even in the past year.

    The only oddity of the D-VHS decks was that the stabilizer could be engaged at the same time as the TBC. That's what led to me hunt down many sample units over the years, but all were ultimately useless given how EP tracking was generally subpar. And it's EP tapes that often need a stabilizer. The stabilizer+TBC issue could be resolved instead by using stabilizer on an S-VHS deck, paired with an ES10/15 on passthrough. You get ES10/15 side effects, but at least it tracks well now.

    I do sometimes hear about supposedly good EP tracking from D-VHS users, but I'm unable to confirm. I still heavily doubt it would pass my test library, and would probably get a B+ at best on my VCR tracking scale. More likely is the owner has a sweet-spot tracking on the tapes that the D-VHS deck likes.

    if its been fully reconditioned by a skilled tech with documented proof
    That statement doesn't make any sense. VCR repairs have never had "documented proof" from any repair shop, as far back as I can remember. They'll jot down a few notes about what was causing the error, but they're not going to catalog a recipe. Never happened, never will happen.

    I've actually started to repair some select JVC models for others, using my own stash of for-parts decks, and I'm not wasting my time documenting every little thing I did. You send a broken VCR, you get a good one back (if I can fix it), and some brief notes on what the fault was. The user/customer usually does not care, nor even understand, all the jabberwocky technical jargon. I save that for forum conversations, where the person clearly has interest.

    I'd only buy D-VHS if it was vetted with a large sampling of EP tapes, and tracked about 75%+ of those. Or if I only had SP mode tapes.
    Last edited by lordsmurf; 25th Dec 2018 at 04:05.
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  22. Oh for Pete's sake: "documented proof of repair" doesn't mean a dossier: it just means an ordinary receipt from a legit trained repair person/shop, indicating the VCR in question was recently overhauled (matching serial #), the date, and the fee charged, with contact info for verification. I don't think thats too much to ask when a seller demands $400 and up for one of the magical JVCs or Panasonics that everyone is chasing.

    And "magic" can be the only explanation for your inexplicable, ongoing ability to trip over fields of virgin JVCs barely touched by little old ladies in Pasadena. Most seekers of same don't have such luck. As far as the SVHS classics being in better condition because they were pitched at pros: no, just no. "Pros" beat their stuff to death, then sell it when it can no longer be practically repaired. "High end" SVHS consumers were no saints either: they bought SVHS to *use* it for heavy recording, or they didn't bother. Once the original owners sold them the first time, recommendations from experts like you drove those models into a reselling frenzy among average joes wanting to digitize their VHS. By now, they've all been taken for a spin more times than the pre-production Tesla at your local auto show.

    DVHS, OTOH, *was* mostly bought by pretentious wealthy tech dilettantes (who promptly realized they couldn't record HBO in high-def, forgot about them, didn't use them, then resold them a few years later). Its splitting hairs to say the SVHS and DVHS were mfr'd in close to the same era: thats an incomplete fact. While production may have overlapped, many of the final SVHS models were end-of-life tinker toys (HR-S9911) vs many of the DVHS being halo products that retailed for twice as much. Mitsubishi dropped out early, yes, but JVC flogged that dead horse of a format far into the 2000s. One also needs to consider the warehouses full of DVHS that sat unsold for years on end: you could actually still buy brand new sealed-in-box Mitsubishi HS-HD2000 units (and several JVC variants) until 2014 or so, meaning the supply of circulating DVHS has a good chunk of "like new" floating around in it.

    If you're gonna use EP playback ability as your primary criterion, all bets are off anyway. You'd have a better chance winning Powerball than finding a JVC, Mitsubishi or Panasonic with TBC/DNR *and* great EP tracking. EP and LP were always a messy format, never intended to be archive material. Anyone with a massive collection of EP recordings is up a creek: either buy a verified deck from a trustworthy guru like LordSmurf, or discard the tapes. Getting any VCR to track EP well requires factory training and skill, getting one of the cursed TBC/DNR premium models to do so almost requires divine intervention. More often than not, a deck thats good for EP trades off SP tracking (and vice versa), esp in regards to HiFi audio.
    Last edited by orsetto; 28th Dec 2018 at 13:08.
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  23. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by orsetto View Post
    And "magic" can be the only explanation for your inexplicable, ongoing ability to trip over fields of virgin JVCs barely touched by little old ladies in Pasadena. Most seekers of same don't have such luck.
    Well, you know, Smurfs are magical after all.

    "Pros" beat their stuff to death, then sell it when it can no longer be practically repaired.
    Well, no, it really depends on the type of professional. For example, photographers tend to be far more gentle with their equipment than IT eggheads working at broadcast facilities. The roughest pros tended to avoid JVC, and not for quality/performance reasons. Those same ones got their meat hooks on Panasonic VTRs, which is why some AG-1980s look like they were operated using sledge hammers.

    they bought SVHS to *use* it for heavy recording
    Nah, not the high end decks. The lower end decks were our workhorses. Those recorded 100% the same as the pricier decks. I'm not rough on gear, but I definitely ran some HR-S3800U decks into the ground between 97 and 01. Out of all my 3800 decks, I have only one left. I keep it mostly for nostalgia.

    DVHS, OTOH, *was* mostly bought by pretentious wealthy tech dilettantes (who promptly realized they couldn't record HBO in high-def, forgot about them, didn't use them, then resold them a few years later).
    Or even set the clock.

    Its splitting hairs to say the SVHS and DVHS were mfr'd in close to the same era: thats an incomplete fact. While production may have overlapped, many of the final SVHS models were end-of-life tinker toys (HR-S9911) vs many of the DVHS being halo products that retailed for twice as much. Mitsubishi dropped out early, yes, but JVC flogged that dead horse of a format far into the 2000s. One also needs to consider the warehouses full of DVHS that sat unsold for years on end: you could actually still buy brand new sealed-in-box Mitsubishi HS-HD2000 units (and several JVC variants) until 2014 or so, meaning the supply of circulating DVHS has a good chunk of "like new" floating around in it.
    Hmmm... yes and no. The D-VHS had a better build quality than the EOL S-VHS decks (lots of plastic), but build quality is only part of the story. Neither were as good as the non-EOL decks (9900, 7900, SR-V10, some others). And then you're overlooking some of the highest-end S-VHS combo decks, which were available new for about $700 on eCost through at least 2009.

    I'm just not impressed by the HS-HD2000.
    - The audio heads were lousy.
    - The unit was tuned to SP (a B- on my tracking scale, B+ at best, sometimes C).
    - The remote is a PITA to replace, and remotes are a consumable with long-term deck usage.

    If you're gonna use EP playback ability as your primary criterion, all bets are off anyway. You'd have a better chance winning Powerball than finding a JVC, Mitsubishi or Panasonic with TBC/DNR *and* great EP tracking.
    Anyone with a massive collection of EP recordings is up a creek: either buy a verified deck from a trustworthy guru like LordSmurf, or discard the tapes. Getting any VCR to track EP well requires factory training and skill, getting one of the cursed TBC/DNR premium models to do so almost requires divine intervention. More often than not, a deck thats good for EP trades off SP tracking (and vice versa), esp in regards to HiFi audio.
    Yes, EP/SLP tracking can be tricky. There are some select models out there, which track EP/SLP better than others. But very often, it requires tweaking to the mechanical deck values. That included both new and used gear. Some can never be tuned well for it, which was a flaw of most D-VHS decks. All D-VHS models were lousy, but it could vary unit to unit. You'd hear about the odd unit that cooperated decently, though I never saw one in person. The most frustrating is when the video and audio refuse to track at the same time. Those are SP-only decks.
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  24. Hello.

    I have a question.
    Which VCR from among those listed below (and available for me to purchase) in your opinion is / will be the best to play VHS tapes - the best in terms of the presented image quality ? The goal is to convert VHS tapes to a digital file in the best quality from the source in first step.
    Would you put together your list starting with the best for these tasks in your opinion ?

    - Panasonic NV-FS100EG
    - Panasonic NV-HS950EG
    - Panasonic NV-HS930EG-S
    - Panasonic NV-HS960EG-S
    - Panasonic NV-SV121EG
    - Panasonic NV-HS1000EGC and EG

    - JVC HR-S7711EU
    - JVC HR-S7722EU
    - JVC HR-S8700EU
    - JVC HR-S9600EU

    - Philips VR 1200
    - Philips VR 1600

    Do you know the years of production of these VCR's, that is since when till when(production years) they were produced?
    I found something like this here once(For example, the Philips VR 20 D was produced in the years 1999-2002 from what I know from the information I have found.):
    https://forum.videohelp.com/threads/286055-VCR-buying-guide-(S-VHS-D-VHS-Professional)...e2#post1843113
    https://forum.videohelp.com/threads/286055-VCR-buying-guide-(S-VHS-D-VHS-Professional)...e2#post1876423

    Is it possible that, for example, the Panasonic NV-HS1000 was produced yet, for example, in 2011 year?
    For example, on eBay, I see that there are VCR's with accessories that look new (in original boxes, foils and seemingly not used, at least not too many times) for example: Panasonic NV-HS1000 and many of the models of this equipment offered in various places look very good (at least from the outside).
    (I know that someone could just keep the equipment for many years without using it or very few times.)

    I know that probably the last VHS VCR was manufactured by Funai (manufactured under Sanyo) in 2016. I don't know the model of this VCR. Do you know ? It was VHS or with S-VHS(or maybe too D-VHS) ?

    Maybe you would recommend some VCRs for these purposes (generally available for purchase - even from time to time) at the present time other than the ones I presented ?
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  25. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by dima View Post
    Hello.
    I have a question.
    Which VCR from among those listed below
    I'd narrow it down to these two:
    - Panasonic NV-HS1000
    - JVC HR-S7722

    Quality decks were made in the late 90s and early 00s, not the 10s.
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  26. Thank you for your response.

    I also thought the most about the Panasonic NV-HS1000. But also about Panasonic NV-SV121.
    Did you use these two devices and are able to compare them to each other?

    Later produced(newer) such as: Panasonic NV-SV121 or JVC HR-S9600 doesn't mean that they are better in terms of image quality that we are able to get compared to older devices such as those mentioned: Panasonic NV-HS1000 or JVC HR-S7722(because it's probably older than HR-S9600) ?
    [There is also the issue of device performance, where I think that for example DD (Dynamics Drums) in JVC can do more harm than good for example for cassettes. (Maybe). Action TBC, NR, Menu and so on. It may be better if they(TBC, NR) are separated and different devices may have different degrees of advanced, action. I read about it, among others, in this forum.]
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  27. Member Seeker47's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by lordsmurf View Post
    Originally Posted by dima View Post
    Hello.
    I have a question.
    Which VCR from among those listed below
    I'd narrow it down to these two:
    - Panasonic NV-HS1000
    - JVC HR-S7722

    Quality decks were made in the late 90s and early 00s, not the 10s.
    It sounded to me like many of the models dima mentioned were European models, rather than U.S. ?

    Where -- other than eBay -- are such models still being sold, preferably by reliable sources ?

    I don't know if 'Southern Advantage' is still around, or still any good, but lots of luck finding service or parts, at this point.
    When in Las Vegas, don't miss the Pinball Hall of Fame Museum http://www.pinballmuseum.org/ -- with over 150 tables from 6+ decades of this quintessentially American art form.
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  28. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Seeker47 View Post
    Where -- other than eBay -- are such models still being sold, preferably by reliable sources ?
    VCRshop.nl
    He's sort of like the EU version of myself and TGrant for the quality VCRs we all need.
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  29. lordsmurf

    Can you or someone else reply to this post: https://forum.videohelp.com/threads/286055-VCR-buying-guide-(S-VHS-D-VHS-Professional)...e9#post2555040 ? Apart from what is written there in: "[ ]", because this topic requires a longer speech and probably many times was discussed on the forum.
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  30. In reference to my above post I will add that here: http://www.digitalfaq.com/forum/video-restore/1567-vcr-buying-guide.html#post37136 on the list there is for example a distinguished(bold) model: JVC HR-S9600, and JVC HR-S7722 not (about which I wrote that they are available for me and which I listed them on the list). So I don't know how it is and whether, for example, the reason for a clear reason is an incomplete list or proximity of JVC HR-S9600 to JVC HR-S9500, which, as it is write there, is not recommended: "Not suggested: HR-S7500, HR-S9500, as the models lack. Same for the 2x00, 3x00, 4x00, 5x00 and 6x00 series; same reasons as NTSC models." I just don't know why. EDIT: Probably I know why: http://www.digitalfaq.com/forum/video-workflows/9282-panasonic-nv-fs200.html#post58246
    Last edited by dima; 14th Jul 2019 at 11:32.
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