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  1. Hello guys I know there are a lot of people on here that own panasonic dvd recorders and I am trying to find a new one to replace the old pioneer I had and have tried a few but are not happy with how they record my vhs tapes. The quesion I have is on the older models of panasonic dvd recorders there was always some sort of an audio problem that when i played a disc it made in a playstation 2 every now and then the audio would break up then be out of sync by one second and if I paused it then it would be ok then. I have read that only the panasonics where the only ones to do that. I had the dmr e30 and dmr e55 models and they both did that. Does the new ones still have that problem with how it encodes the audio? I am looking at the dmr ez 27k at walmart.com but am a little leary on getting it. I was a little unhappy with how the panasonic was a little blocky even with the noise reduction. Hope someone can answer before I try one. Thanks
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    I have had several different Panny's including ES-15, ES25, ES30, EZ17 and ES27, personally I have never had problems with audio sync. I usually record on the Panny's and play back on my Sony players. Not sure why your were getting sync problems unless maybe they are somewhat incompatible with your PS2? I don't believe they have handled the audio different on the new EZ series so I'm thinking you might still have problems with those, but the only way to know is try. If you purchase yours at a B/M store you shouldn't have a problem returning them if they do give you a problem with audio. Like I said I personally have never had the problem you are having, so I would think it might be more related to your PS2. I don't have a PS2, nor have ever tried playing back any of my DVD's on a PS2.
    As far as blockieness or as I've have heard it referred to as macroblocking, yes Panny's tend to have a problem with that on speeds between FR3 and LP. The reason is because they keep full resolution all the way to LP 4hr speed. The downfall of this is the bitrate gets starved in fast moving scenes. Knowing this I personally try and not go over FR3 if I know the scene is going to contain lots of fast movement. You could also use say a FR4hr. 1 min., which will force the machine to step down the resolution and help reduce the macroblocking. Apparently any speed above LP will step down the resolution. Note I have not personally tried this, I'm only going on what I have read on other posts. I personally like the full resolution and would prefer not to lose it, even if it means the occasional macroblocking.
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  3. Ok thanks for your help then I already decided to try a toshiba dvd recorder and see how it does. I guess if I don't like the way it does then I will have to go back to a magnavox wich is the same as all funai recorders. I have a sv2000 and it does a nice job for recording with many different types of media and is not picky with it. Also it does good captures from my directv in 2 hour mode. The downside is it does not have noise reduction wich helps with vhs transfers. Thanks
    Eric
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  4. After using Toshiba recorders, I'd never use anything else again. I don't know about the new recorders, but the D-R4 is amazing, no matter what the source is.
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  5. Panasonics are "love it or hate it" recorders: for every passionate defender of them as being ultra high resolution there are two complaints about macroblocking and audio sync. Add in the timer recording problems of the new models and they are not a good bet for someone used to the smooth operation of a Pioneer.

    Toshiba has probably the best video quality of all, unfortunately combined with the most complicated interface and arguably the most horrendously chintzy burner mechanics. When they work, they are phenomenal, but be aware they are known for quick burner death. Reports vary as to whether current Toshibas still retain all the video "magic" and adjustments of earlier models. Toshiba tends to oversensitive copy protection which could prove troublesome with your tape transfers.

    Avoid Sony like the plague, they are the absolute worst bet for tape transfers because the new models are loaded to the teeth with copy protection lockouts: many MANY complaints about this.

    The current models from all the above mfrs are ridiculously overpriced given they don't have hard drives: you are paying thru the nose for a basic DVD recorder with a buggy new digital ATSC tuner. The tuner is nice to have but most of us are holding back for another model revision to fix all the bugs. Analog broadcasts will continue until next February, there will surely be revised models by then.

    Short term you should probably just stick with using the Funai deck you already have: since you have tested it and reported it is working well, you're unlikely to improve on it. The fact that it was very inexpensive means nothing: all these decks are made from cardboard anyway these days, and the big name brand is no guarantee of quality: no matter what you buy, you might have to return or exchange it. If you like your $50 Funai well enough, buy another of the exact same model from the same store so hopefully its from the same good batch.

    Personally, I am used to Pioneer and would rather avoid switching to another brand: I just like the way they operate, their hard drives, and their total reliability. Video quality is probably on par with your Funai, Pios are neither the best nor the worst in resolution. What they do have is superior signal stability when recording from VHS: they are rock solid and are unaffected by tape glitches that knock out other brands. When I or my friends need one, we buy from online dealers in Canada (Pio is no longer sold in US). Its a pain to arrange but we have never had a problem with any of the decks we got from Canada. Depending on your budget and preference for Pioneer, this could be an option for you.

    Otherwise the most popular new DVD recorder for sale to hobbyists in the USA right now is the Phillips 3575 with its stabler-than-most ATSC tuner and now-rare built in 160GB hard drive. It sells for about $280, usually at Wal*Mart or Best Buy online. Many reviews and tips here on the forum, search for "Phillips 3575" and see for yourself.
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  6. Well I agree with you on most parts. I have not yet used a Toshiba dvd recorder but I hope mine will last a while but I am going to go ahead and buy another magnavox dvd recorder for 134.00 wich has the same encoder and everything that my sv 2000 does. I wanted to get another sv model but walmart does not sell them anymore. O well I will have to post my results with the toshiba once I get it.
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  7. I did have a Toshiba D-R4 die after about 9 months of heavy use, it quit reading blank R discs, but up until that day I never had any problems with it. I'm on my second D-R4 now. It's about 1 1/2 years old and still works great. Toshiba picture quality is definitely second to none.
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  8. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
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    Look for the Philips 3575 from Circuit City or Walmart.
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  9. 'it made in a playstation 2 every now and then the audio would break up then be out of sync by one second and if I paused it then it would be ok then.'

    Maybe you should run your PS2 laser alignment program?

    'boot the PS2 with no disc, once at mainscreen press "triangle" go to diagnostics and turn it from off to on. press "O" until you back at the browser screen, insert a DVD , once it boots wait one minute and reset the PS2. This will recalibrate the laser and works 90% of the time'
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