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  1. Member tekkieman's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by gll99
    @AlecWest

    I too want to try Linux but didn't know where to start.
    LiveCDs.

    Most linux distros can be downloaded as an ISO. Download the image, burn to CD, boot off the CD, and you have a linux environment to play in that doesn't touch your existing system. It's a great way to find a distro you like, that works with your hardware, and keeps you at ease about your existing configuration. When your done, remove the CD, reboot, and your computer is just like you had it.

    If you computer specs are beefy enough, download the ISOs, and run them in a VM. Then you can install them to the virtual drive. This regains a little performance since it is no longer running off the CD, but won't tell you as much about compatibility with your hardware since it is now running on the virtual hardware.

    As far as which distro to try, everyone has their favorite, and they're happy to tell you that one is "the best". It may be the best for them and their hardware, but it may not be for yours. If you are a broadband user, download and test several. If not, there are reputable sites that will ship you CDs for < $5 a distro. Ubuntu will mail you some for free. See if you have a Linux Users Group (LUG) in your area. The local geeks will be happy to give you CDs, and even help you install it. Might I suggest the top 4 or 5 listed on distrowatch?. The graphic on my sig will take you to the site of the current #4 (although the latest upgrade version is still a beta release).

    The thing to remember is that linux is an alternative OS. It is not a replacement for Windows. It works differently, and if you expect things to work like Windows, you start with misconceptions that will lead you to failure. There are applications that work like Windows apps, and it is even possible to run some Windows apps through Wince, Crossover, or Cedega, but it still is not[ Windows. On the other hand, this is becoming a good thing these days...
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  2. Member tekkieman's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by GMaq
    I've been checking out the Linux Tools section, and am curious if there is any support for iPods in the Linux world, I know there are lots of encoders for MPEG-4 in Linux or cross platform tools but I don't see much in reference to iPods specifically, any guidance??
    gtkpod and amaroK.

    I can't say for sure since I don't own one, but I believe the bigger problem is iTunes.


    Originally Posted by GMaq
    I'm pretty handy with hardware and Windows softs but I've never compiled anything in my life
    I'm somewhat handy with them as well, and in using linux for the last three years, I can also say that I've never compiled anything in my life*.

    Originally Posted by GMaq
    Tekkieman you make a persuasive case for MEPIS, if it wasn't open source you'd make a great salesman!!
    Lots of people make money off of open source. Look at Red Hat, Novell, Canonical, TAFusion, etc.


    *This statement is actually a lie. As a software developer, I compile code frequently. I only mean that I've never needed to compile source code in linux to make an existing application install or work.
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  3. Member GMaq's Avatar
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    Tekkieman,
    Thanks for your reply, I'll check out the iPod apps, and thanks for all the great advice to all of the prospective Linux Newbies in this thread, It could be that Vista may be the best thing that ever happened to Linux!! I think there are a lot of people out there that have computers with 2-3GHz single core processors that are able to do everything they want with XP but are still getting a little restless to change it up since XP has been around for a while but don't want to spend big bucks on Duo Cores with Quad Cores being just around the corner, the false sense of urgency that all of these hardware/software "improvements" creates is marketing run amok.
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  4. Member tekkieman's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by GMaq
    ...but don't want to spend big bucks on Duo Cores with Quad Cores being just around the corner
    I know the feeling. I was at the point of needing an upgrade (P4 1.8G 512M RAM), but not ready to shell out for the dual cores with the quads (and inevitable price drop of the duals) being right around the corner, so I opted for an interim solution that fit my budget. I opted for a barebones kit (more like a full system) with a Pentium D 830 dual core 3G. Dual core goodness, single core price, and gives me a great upgrade path to the duals or the quads when I'm ready.

    This thing came with the motherboard, case, PS, PD 830 ($75 USD), CPU fan, 1G ram, 250G SATA HD, and 16X dual layer DVD burner for under $400 USD. All I needed to do was move my cheap PCI GeForce 5200 over and I was in business. Sure, the thing heats my home office, but with 6 inches of snow yesterday, I was thankful for it.

    Between dual booting and virtual machines, I'm running multiple OSes with little problem.
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  5. Member GMaq's Avatar
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    Great link, Thanks lpn1160!
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  6. Member GMaq's Avatar
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    OK,
    Downloaded the ISO for Ubuntu and had a look see, very impressive and intuitive GUI, I just ran it off the CD for a while to kick the tires but it had no difficulty at all with the hardware in my computer, Sound, Video and my wireless NIC were all operational in no time. I think I'll do a full install when I get my "Linux Box" together. I've been checking out some Linux software applications and what I find confusing is the number of packages to download, How do you know what will work with what?? If the software in question lists "Debian" or "Fedora" builds only does that mean that it won't work with Ubuntu or MEPIS? or is Linux software universal to all versions but more or less functional within the different flavours? I would hazard to guess that this kind of stuff is what makes Windows users apprehensive about Linux. But I'm interested in learning more, and I'm well aware that I've got some homework to do.
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  7. Renegade gll99's Avatar
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    Just tried ubuntu 6.10 booted from cd and selected start and it booted to a yellow/plum blank screen with a large mouse cursor that didn't move or respond. No keys worked and the cd had no activity for quite a while. The option with basic graphics did the same.

    Bummer!

    I am trying to get the 6.06.1 version of the iso to try that one.... "ubuntu-6.06.1-desktop-i386.iso"

    http://mirrors.cat.pdx.edu/ubuntu-iso/6.06.1/

    I hope I selected the right one there are so many versions

    What's the "ubuntu-6.06.1-alternate-powerpc.iso" version?
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  8. Member tekkieman's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by GMaq
    OK,
    I've been checking out some Linux software applications and what I find confusing is the number of packages to download, How do you know what will work with what?? If the software in question lists "Debian" or "Fedora" builds only does that mean that it won't work with Ubuntu or MEPIS? or is Linux software universal to all versions but more or less functional within the different flavours?
    I guess that depends on how you are "checking out" the packages. If you are looking at a large code repository like sourceforge, then you will find compressed source files, and binaries. The binaries are a lot like a self-extracting setup exe file. The two biggest types are debs and rpms. Fedora, derivatives, and other distros use the RPM package type (RPM = Redhat Package Management). Debian, derivatives (Ubuntu, Mepis, etc), and other distros use debs (Debian package system).

    If you are looking in the Ubuntu repositories (through Synaptic package manager in Ubuntu), the package may reference Ubuntu, Mepis, Debian, or nothing at all, but if it is in the Ubuntu repository, then you can be (almost completely) assured that it will work in tour system. If one thing needs something else to work (a dependency), Synaptic will take care of marking that for you.

    Going outside your base Ubuntu repositories, you will need to look for debs. I know this works in Mepis, so I am pretty sure it will work in Ubuntu, but if you click on a downloaded deb, it knows that means to install. Much like a self-extracting exe.

    Interestingly enough, if you just can't find a deb anywhere, and fear compiling from the source code, an RPM may also work for you (in deb based systems), by using a program called "alien". It is a rpm-deb converter.

    So, to recap, you are safest sticking to applications found in the Ubuntu repositories. You can browse those through Synaptic package manager. If you find something you like, select mark (or right-click and select mark for installation), and when you are finished browsing, click Apply. That easy. If you find software outside the repository, then you need debs, or rpms to convert with alien, or source code to compile. Again, in over three years, I have never needed to compile source to get an app that I've wanted to install.


    Originally Posted by GMaq
    I would hazard to guess that this kind of stuff is what makes Windows users apprehensive about Linux. But I'm interested in learning more, and I'm well aware that I've got some homework to do.
    Is this really any different than a box (or text file) that says "Requires Windows 2000, XP or later". Or knowing that a piece of software is for Windows or Mac?
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  9. Member tekkieman's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by gll99
    Just tried ubuntu 6.10 booted from cd and selected start and it booted to a yellow/plum blank screen with a large mouse cursor that didn't move or respond. No keys worked and the cd had no activity for quite a while. The option with basic graphics did the same.

    Bummer!
    The biggest percentage of problems like this are due to bad CD burns of the ISO. The far biggest percentage! Did you confirm the md5 sums of the download, then again after the burn? That is likely where the problem is.

    I looked at your computer details, and if they are up to date, then I really don't see anything there that would account for it hardware-wise, other than perhaps your ATI video. ATI is not known for being ultra-linux-friendly, but that does not mean it will not work. The CD should give you an option (where you start it from) to use VESA. You might try that. If it is the ATI card causing the problem, this will get around it. If it then works, there are other methods to getting the ATI to work (much like installing a specific driver in Windows).

    My laptop has an ATI Mobility 200, and Ubuntu gave me serious fits. Mepis (based on the Ubuntu repos curiously enough) worked fine, but required booting with the VESA video driver.

    Originally Posted by gll99
    I am trying to get the 6.06.1 version of the iso to try that one.... "ubuntu-6.06.1-desktop-i386.iso"

    http://mirrors.cat.pdx.edu/ubuntu-iso/6.06.1/

    I hope I selected the right one there are so many versions
    I can't tell you it won't work as I'm not a Ubuntu expert. However, since it is an older version, the chance is that it is less likely than the 6.1 version (unless it used to work, then broke).

    I really believe the problem lies with one of the two issues mentioned above. Although, if it was a bad download, the 6.06 might work if you get a good download/burn.

    Originally Posted by gll99
    What's the "ubuntu-6.06.1-alternate-powerpc.iso" version?
    For Power-PC Macs.
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    If this hasn't been said enough, I'll say it again Linux isn't windows, have patience and READ. Make this your first bookmark: http://www.linuxquestions.org
    When you get frustrated and ready to give up, ask questions, use google & READ.
    I have not used windows for well over a year now, and I've never looked back.
    Good-luck to all Linux new-comers. Welcome
    and may the "source" be with you
    "The software said Win XP or better, so I Installed Linux"
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    So, for those of you considering switching to Linux, you can see where this thread has landed up...with a bunch of software engineers trying to explain to normal computer users how to find the right version of Linux, how to install it, what to do when you get frustrated (and you WILL get frustrated), and where to go for help when things stop working.

    Sounds like a pleasant experience. It's the old adage: "The devil you know (XP) is better than the devil you don't (Linux)."

    As for Vista being good news for Linux -- heh -- they said the same thing about Windows XP when it was first released. But slowly EVERYONE moved over to the new platform, and now it's the dominant operating system in the industry.

    The same will be true of Vista. I use it everyday and would never go back to Windows XP.

    A couple years from now, when everyone is using Vista, we'll be looking at the NEXT Windows operating system and saying, "We'll never switch."

    As for Linux -- try it out -- force yourself to use it for a week or two straight (without going back to XP). You'll find more obstacles and disappointments than you will moments of satisfaction. And you'll discover that XP isn't so bad afterall.

    I'm not saying that Linux is bad -- but it's certainly not better than XP. At least not for 90% of the population.
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    God bless all you windows users, if you must have microsoft products because you must "point and click" and have everything neatly packaged
    because the "alternatives are too difficult" well to each his own. Please keep all your virus/malware, wga, apps phoneing home (& os), activation, and a company that couldn't care less about you your system and your computing needs and wants... all the power to you.
    "The software said Win XP or better, so I Installed Linux"
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    Originally Posted by lpn1160
    God bless all you windows users, if you must have microsoft products because you must "point and click" and have everything neatly packaged because the "alternatives are too difficult" well to each his own.
    I mentioned this earlier. I get paid to do work on a computer, not screw around with the OS to make the computer even work. When it's not at work, I have better things to do in life that play with an OS. Some people enjoy computers, more power to you. I have hobbies you'd probably find wasteful and stupid too.

    Originally Posted by lpn1160
    Please keep all your virus/malware, wga, apps phoneing home (& os), activation, and a company that couldn't care less about you your system and your computing needs and wants... all the power to you.
    Not this again.
    - Virus? Use AV software. No virus. Something like AVG takes near-zero resources, and is free.
    - Malware? I'm not an idiot. Do not install unknown software, illegal crap online, run e-mail attachments, or use outdated browsers (IE5) that allowed stuff to auto-run. Nothing will help an idiot, computers or otherwise. Those people would find a way to mess up a paperclip.
    - WGA? Buy your OS. Still problem? There are workarounds (and that's what Linux fans do anyway, right?).
    - Apps phoning home? Don't buy or use them. Use a firewall. Lots of solutions.

    Originally Posted by rkgibbons
    So, for those of you considering switching to Linux, you can see where this thread has landed up...with a bunch of software engineers trying to explain to normal computer users how to find the right version of Linux, how to install it, what to do when you get frustrated (and you WILL get frustrated), and where to go for help when things stop working.
    I largely agree with this exact assessment. But I still try new Linux versions myself, and encourage others to try them too. I defer to another adage, the one where you don't know how good you have it until you lose it. Hate Windows? Hate Bill Gates? Fine, go try a Linux. Odds are, at least 9 of 10 times, I'll see you back later, using Windows.
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    Thank you Lord, & lordsmurf for I am 1 in 10
    "The software said Win XP or better, so I Installed Linux"
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  15. Member tekkieman's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by rkgibbons
    So, for those of you considering switching to Linux, you can see where this thread has landed up...with a bunch of software engineers trying to explain to normal computer users how to find the right version of Linux, how to install it, what to do when you get frustrated (and you WILL get frustrated), and where to go for help when things stop working.
    Yes, where threads like this always end up...with some Windows expert (read fanboi) coming into a thread started by someone who wants to use linux shouting "don't do it! Microsoft is the only answer to everything".

    Please, what we really have is someone who wants to try something different from the rest of the sheeple, and people using their own free time to assist them out of the goodness of their hearts, and well in the spirit of this very site. (although I will admit that you are correct, I'm am a software engineer by trade, but guess what? I develop Windows and Mac software! Go figure!)

    By the way. forgive me, but I seemed to have missed your constructive input to the question asked...

    Originally Posted by rkgibbons
    Sounds like a pleasant experience. It's the old adage: "The devil you know (XP) is better than the devil you don't (Linux)."
    No different form the people who went from 95/98/ME/NT to XP. "The devil you know...".

    Originally Posted by rkgibbons
    As for Vista being good news for Linux -- heh -- they said the same thing about Windows XP when it was first released. But slowly EVERYONE moved over to the new platform, and now it's the dominant operating system in the industry.
    False. Just take a look at the number of businesses still using NT/Win 2K. These are people who cannot afford to just jump on the latest offering. They use what they have taken painstaking effort to make work to run their business. When their OS vendor flat refuses to support their business, they will upgrade, but that is because they have been forced to by their vendor who planned their business strategy of forced obsolescence at the expense of their very own customers.

    As to Vista being good for linux (as well as mac), laugh all you want, but when you're done, take a moment to seriously think about it...every new Windows version has been good for them. Linux is not losing it tiny little market share, it is gaining. Every single year. No, it's not a mass defection, but the numbers of defectors increases every single year.

    Originally Posted by rkgibbons
    The same will be true of Vista. I use it everyday and would never go back to Windows XP.
    And you are most welcome to it. Understand something. It is really only the commercial entities that want you to switch to linux. The developers who built linux really couldn't care. They built it for themselves. The fact that it is useful to others is not even secondary. It falls much further down their list of cares. If it doesn't work for you, they don't care. They didn't write it for you. However, there are two wonderful things about linux. First, the community may very well take your displeasure and do something to satisfy you (or not). Second, everything is available to you to fix it for yourself. You are fully empowered to make it anything you want it to be! Not a software developer you say? Tough luck. Be nice to the community giving you something for free, and they may give you more, or just take whatever is forced down your throat by a company who doesn't care what you want.


    Originally Posted by rkgibbons
    A couple years from now, when everyone is using Vista, we'll be looking at the NEXT Windows operating system and saying, "We'll never switch."
    You may want to follow the tech publications a little bit closer. The next Windows operating system will be even less yours than Vista. The handwriting is on the wall (and in trade print). Your next OS will be software as a service, or a kernel only with you paying for each and every add on piece to make it functional. Want a pretty GUI? $49.95 please. Notepad? $19.95 please. Control Panel? $39.95. MS Office? $19.95 per month!!!

    Originally Posted by rkgibbons
    As for Linux -- try it out -- force yourself to use it for a week or two straight (without going back to XP). You'll find more obstacles and disappointments than you will moments of satisfaction. And you'll discover that XP isn't so bad afterall.
    Yes, please do. Then you may actual learn the power your computer has, once you learn how to use it, and are not intentionally limited by your OS.

    Originally Posted by rkgibbons
    I'm not saying that Linux is bad -- but it's certainly not better than XP. At least not for 90% of the population.
    You most certainly are saying it! Your entitled to your view, don't try to sugar-coat it after such a beautiful rant. As to the 90% of the population (the punters can inflate that number as much as they want to) , it's fine. The world needs lemmings too. But that same <insert bogus number here>% could get all the same functionality that they actually use in the OS from their cell phone as well.
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  16. Member tekkieman's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by lpn1160
    Thank you Lord, & lordsmurf for I am 1 in 10
    So am I 2 in 20?

    Originally Posted by lordsmurf
    I mentioned this earlier. I get paid to do work on a computer, not screw around with the OS to make the computer even work.
    The last three computers I've popped a LiveCD into have just worked without "screwing with the OS". That would be hard to do with a read-only CD.

    If your computer can't, how is it you use it to get work done? It must be some really "unique" piece of..... equipment.


    Originally Posted by lordsmurf
    Some people enjoy computers, more power to you. I have hobbies you'd probably find wasteful and stupid too.
    Quoted just to say I at least found something in your post that I can agree with 100%
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  17. Member AlecWest's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by rkgibbons
    As for Vista being good news for Linux -- heh -- they said the same thing about Windows XP when it was first released. But slowly EVERYONE moved over to the new platform, and now it's the dominant operating system in the industry.
    Define slowly? Sales of Vista lag behind sales of XP when it first came out. And many more people own computers now than when XP came out. Even Microsoft admits their sales projections for Vista were too optimistic.

    Vista's licensing agreement is, by far, the most intrusive licensing agreement to date from Microsoft. We saw the beginnings of this intrusive attitude with the advent of XP ... which is partly why I still have a Win98SE partition ... and why I usually only use my XP partition for video work (and Win98SE for just about everything else). And, this intrusive attitude may give many home users a moment of pause before converting (notice I didn't say "upgrading") from XP. I'm not saying Vista is dead in the water by any means. But, I suspect Vista will give slowly a whole new meaning when it comes to acceptance among the general public.

    BTW, I've worked on Macintosh computers before. I can work on them again. And insofar as Linux is concerned, here's another quote to ponder along with "The devil you know is better than the devil you don't." The quote is from Milton, "It is better to rule in Hell than serve in Heaven." Linux may be Hell to some people (grin). But, given Vista's licensing agreement, I think for a change I'd like to rule in Hell.
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    The unfortunate thing about threads like this are everyone gets pissed off about some imaginary caricature of what the original intention was, I would say in reading over the posts that there are a few XP users who aren't ready for Vista yet for whatever reason, and are curious about Linux. Even if I do something with Linux I will not be abandoning XP, and after Vista has established itself and it's a logical time to upgrade I probably will as well. I am curious about Linux because being a member here for a few years I have experienced the excellent work and community spirit of open source programs, and am curious how this extends to the Platform OS. I applaud and thank the Linux users who have taken their valuable time to answer some "stupid" questions which will not benefit them personally at all. I don't want to be warned about how hairs will grow on the palm of my hand if I try Linux for kicks, I don't need to know how great Windows is, I KNOW! If you OS Partisans want to start another thread espousing the virtues of any of the three OS's and denigrating the competition feel free. But this thread is for people curious about Linux who are intelligent enough to make their own decisions!
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  19. Member AlecWest's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by GMaq
    The unfortunate thing about threads like this are everyone gets pissed off about some imaginary caricature of what the original intention was.
    Well, the topic title is Thinking of switching from XP to Linux...should I? That's a loaded question right of the bat ... especially since, in the post that started this thread, the originator specifically said they were NOT going to Vista. Abandoning Microsoft OS releases, to some people, would be akin to asking Thinking of switching from Christianity to Islam...should I?

    But, you're correct. This thread has turned into a pissing contest between Microsoft devotees and Linux devotees. However, I feel more akin to the original poster since I'm a devotee of neither ... having never tried Linux myself (yet) ... but have become tired of the same-old same-old and have no plans to go with Vista. Not that Vista is bad software. I've never tried it so I cannot judge it. My beef with Vista is not with the software but with the terms of the licensing agreement.

    Hehe, BTW, I have considered another alternative to Linux, Macs, Vista, and the hobby of home-video (which is why we're all here on VideoHelp.com) -- rediscovering radio and books. It could happen.
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    Originally Posted by lpn1160
    Thank you Lord, & lordsmurf for I am 1 in 10
    I might be 1/3rd of a person, if I could get one of my three systems to adapt to Linux. Windows XP is nothing but a whore on one of my computers, but I mostly blame the hardware. It was some cheap AMD/VIA crap I bought some years ago, big mistake. This is usually where I try Linux, and it tends to fail.

    That system now gives me an error message, nice big BSOD, when I go to shut down the system. The internal hardware powers off (hard drives, USB/serial for mouse, etc), but the video display is stuck on BSOD and the power supply is humming power to the motherboard.

    Trust me, I'm not an MS fan either. I'm equal opportunity, I hate them all the same!
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    staying on topic, here goes. since this is a video forum, if you are thinkin of switching to linux I can state that:
    1: I can capture video to my system
    2: encode at very high quality to either mpeg4 compliant video or mpeg2 for dvd
    3: author and burn to dvd
    4: rip my personally owned dvd's
    5: rip and encode my audio cd collection
    6:listen & view streaming content
    7:use my ipod
    8can my photos and import from my still and digital movie camera
    9: I can edit my photos with high quality software
    Last: there's not a thing I can't do with my linux only system, that I did when I used windows.That's just the tip of the iceberg on the multimedia side.
    So to any one who is thinking of switching, Welcome to the good side of the force
    "The software said Win XP or better, so I Installed Linux"
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    Some over emotional folks seemed to jump on my comments.

    As for suggesting that I made up my numbers...well...I didn't exactly make them up. But i did exaggerate them. Linux doesn't have NEARLY 10% of the market.

    The install base for Linux is estimated at about 1.3%.

    In fact, a larger and larger number of computers are shipping to emerging countries with Linux installed (as it allows for the sale of far cheaper computers to third-world nations) -- but nearly 75% of those computers end up running Windows OS (as people abandon Linux in droves).

    That's not to say that Linux use isn't growing. It is.

    But it's not nearly 1 in 10.

    Keep dreamin' Anti-Microsoft folks.

    Oh, and take a shower once in awhile.

    STATS come from:
    http://www.macobserver.com/article/2004/10/01.4.shtml
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    And, believe it or not, I actually use Linux on a fairly regular basis (and like it). I'm a web-developer/web-master so I'm constantly submerged in the world of Apache.

    But I'm not a Linux ZEALOT.

    Linux is NOT an O/S for the casual user. Despite all the Anti-Microsoft rhetoric that the Linux community likes to spout.
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  24. Member tekkieman's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by rkgibbons
    Some over emotional folks seemed to jump on my comments.
    Originally Posted by rkgibbons
    Keep dreamin' Anti-Microsoft folks.
    Originally Posted by rkgibbons
    Oh, and take a shower once in awhile.
    Speaking of emotional... Expecting a visit from Uncle Red and Aunt Flo?

    Originally Posted by rkgibbons


    Surely unbiased... :P

    So, tell me...exactly how does one track linux usage stats when it does not require purchase, registration, phoning home, etc.?

    Originally Posted by rkgibbons
    Linux doesn't have NEARLY 10% of the market.
    Originally Posted by rkgibbons
    The install base for Linux is estimated at about 1.3%.
    Originally Posted by rkgibbons
    but nearly 75% of those computers end up running Windows OS (as people abandon Linux in droves).
    Originally Posted by rkgibbons
    well...I didn't exactly make them up. But i did exaggerate them.
    More like:

    1. Bend over.
    2. Reach behind.
    3. Insert up to elbow.
    4. Pull out "statistics".
    5. Post them as fact.


    Most amusing. Thanks for a laugh to start the weekend with.


    here are some in return....

    FreeBSD is like, "Hey, dudes! Come use our free stuff for whatever you like. Just don't forget to thanks us and it's all good."
    Linux is like, "You are free to join our collective but you have to contribute if you want to distribute our free stuff. Whatever you contribute becomes part of our free stuff."

    See the difference? FreeBSD is for hippies and Linux is for commies. It's a subtle distinction, I know.

    (And Macs are like "Hey, our stuff is so much more stylish that those other systems." That's why they tell us that Macs are for gays, I guess.)
    Conversation on security…

    John - Decided iptables was more effective than zonealarm [more configurable] too.
    Jack - You ported iptables to Windows? Neato.
    John - Isn't it obvious? I ported Windows to Linux.

    My mom, who runs Windows, called me because she was having a problem with "Norton Virus." I was going to correct her that it's "Norton Antivirus," then I realized she was right.
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  25. Member FulciLives's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by lpn1160
    staying on topic, here goes. since this is a video forum, if you are thinkin of switching to linux I can state that:
    1: I can capture video to my system
    2: encode at very high quality to either mpeg4 compliant video or mpeg2 for dvd
    3: author and burn to dvd
    4: rip my personally owned dvd's
    5: rip and encode my audio cd collection
    6:listen & view streaming content
    7:use my ipod
    8can my photos and import from my still and digital movie camera
    9: I can edit my photos with high quality software
    Last: there's not a thing I can't do with my linux only system, that I did when I used windows.That's just the tip of the iceberg on the multimedia side.
    So to any one who is thinking of switching, Welcome to the good side of the force
    Which version of Linux do you suggest again and what programs for all of the above do you use?

    I think I read that the Hauppauge WinTV PVR 350 works with Linux ... if so I could see making a media center type PC with Linux. But what about the newer video cards? Will I be able to benefit from an Nvidia card and the PURE VIDEO functions? ... especially for the TV out part?

    - John "FulciLives" Coleman
    "The eyes are the first thing that you have to destroy ... because they have seen too many bad things" - Lucio Fulci
    EXPLORE THE FILMS OF LUCIO FULCI - THE MAESTRO OF GORE
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  26. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by lpn1160
    staying on topic, here goes. since this is a video forum, if you are thinkin of switching to linux I can state that:
    1: I can capture video to my system
    2: encode at very high quality to either mpeg4 compliant video or mpeg2 for dvd
    3: author and burn to dvd
    4: rip my personally owned dvd's
    5: rip and encode my audio cd collection
    6:listen & view streaming content
    7:use my ipod
    8can my photos and import from my still and digital movie camera
    9: I can edit my photos with high quality software
    Last: there's not a thing I can't do with my linux only system, that I did when I used windows.That's just the tip of the iceberg on the multimedia side.
    So to any one who is thinking of switching, Welcome to the good side of the force
    Yes, but you lack choices. That's why I have to use Windows. When you talk about switching to another OS, consider this.

    1. I can capture too: ATI MMC, VirtualDub, WinDV. Or if I wanted (and I don't), VirtualVCR, Adobe Premiere, Ulead, Canopus, TitanTV/mythTV/whatever, etc, etc etc etc. Lots of crap to list.
    2. Procoder, TMPGenc, MainConcept, CCE, lots of crap that's cheap or free
    3. Ulead DVD Workshop, TDA, SVCD2DVD, DVD Lab, DVD Architect, Maestro, Encore... even Scenarist ... etc etc etc
    4. DVD Decrypter, DVD Shrink, DVDFab, lots of crap, etc.
    5. So many to list. From Nero to freewares.
    6. iTunes, others
    7. Photoshop, Nikon/Canon software, TWAIN ... lots of other junk too
    8. Photoshop CS2, others I'd never use but are choices

    It's all about choices.

    Linux and Apple suffer from such a limited number of choices. I wish it were not the case, but it is. And THAT IS THE REASON the OS does not succeed. No software, no sale.
    Want my help? Ask here! (not via PM!)
    FAQs: Best Blank Discs • Best TBCs • Best VCRs for capture • Restore VHS
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  27. Member
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    Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
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    The stats were tabulated from a technology report generated by Gartner Inc.

    Gartner is one of the largest, most respected technology-based market research companies in the world.

    They are ANYTHING but biased.

    They have no association with Microsoft or Linux or Macintosh.

    Where do they get their information? To be honest, I don't know. But it's not too difficult to figure out what operating systems people are using (it's included in the HTTP header information for all activity on the web).
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  28. @tekkieman

    Who on earth came up with the name MEPIS? Methinks they must have been taking it - or drinking it.

    Or does it have some weird pronunciation?
    John Miller
    enosoft - high performance tools for music and video

    Home of the Enosoft DV Processor - Free for personal use!
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  29. Member tekkieman's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by rkgibbons

    Linux is NOT an O/S for the casual user. Despite all the Anti-Microsoft rhetoric that the Linux community likes to spout.
    Ok, define the "casual user".

    Most tend to say the casual user is one who uses the computer for web surfing, email, and office applications.

    How can linux "NOT" be for the casual user? All these things can be done from booting a LiveCD!!!!!

    No installs, no drivers, no fuss, no muss, no slicing or dicing, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah....


    If if you're slightly more geek, you can do what I do and carry a credit card CD and a USB keychain and boot your configured desktop on damn near any computer and save your files when your done.

    Originally Posted by lordsmurf
    It's all about choices.

    Linux and Apple suffer from such a limited number of choices. I wish it were not the case, but it is. And THAT IS THE REASON the OS does not succeed. No software, no sale.

    No choices? No software? My 700M CD has several hundred on it that are available from the LiveCD or immediately after install. The repository of free programs has over 16,000. If that's not enough for you (general, not personal...maybe), you can't be pleased, and there is little sense trying.

    I can't speak to Apple, although a Mac-mini is next on the shopping list.

    Originally Posted by rkgibbons
    he stats were tabulated from a technology report generated by Gartner Inc.

    Gartner is one of the largest, most respected technology-based market research companies in the world.

    They are ANYTHING but biased.

    They have no association with Microsoft or Linux or Macintosh.
    Actually they do. They were busted on several occasions providing "statistics" for Microsofts "Get the Facts" campaign, paid for by Microsoft, and eventually even "fired" when they published a less-than-favorable report.
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