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  1. Member normcar's Avatar
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    My Philips DVDR985 lasted less than a year, I had it "repaired" under the extended war. and it still didn't work. Even when it "worked" I had problems with everthing. The clock didn't even keep good time, it kept gaining about 30sec/day. I paid over $850 for it, and burned less than 50 DVDs with it. It was the worst purchase I have possibly ever made, and I have made some bad purchasing decisions. Philips made a sh*% product, and never backed it up with any recall of any kind. They can KMA (Kiss My ___). I will never purchase another Philips product, and will tell everyone I can not to either.
    Some days it seems as if all I'm doing is rearranging deck chairs on the Titanic

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    I found a bulging capacitor on the power supply board (just 1 year normal useage). I will try replacing it.

    Seems that Panasonic is using sub-quality capacitors in DMR-ES10, maybe other models as well.

    The capacitor brand is ELNA

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    I have a Panasonic DMRES10 DVD Recorder with the infamous power supply problem. Like other people's experiences the recorder went dead just after the 1 year warranty period expired. I wasn't going to fix it until I had heard other experiences from this thread.

    I called Panasonic today and complained that this seemed to be a common defect with this model and would they offer any type of compensation to repair it outside of the warranty period. As a result of this they offered me a $90 credit towards the repair, which is a flat rate of $100, plus I will have to pay a $30 return shipping fee.

    Although it is a hassle to set this up and subsequently return the recorder to them, it seems like it will be worth it if it is only going to cost me $40 total.

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    I also called Panasonic; but they claims that never heard of this common defect on this model. Anyway, out of luck for me.

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    I would try calling them back again and ask for a one time credit towards the repair. If this doesn't work ask to speak to the person's Supervisor about the problem. Be firm in stating your case to them.This is an obvious defect with the recorder and they should fix it outside of the warranty period.

    An update to my situatation, I was able to get the recorder fixed by a local authorized repair center for free by showing them the $90 repair authorization letter from Panasonic. This saved me the $40 expense and hassle of sending the recorder back to their main repair center in Elgin Illinois.

  6. Member normcar's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by heap1
    I would try calling them back again and ask for a one time credit towards the repair. If this doesn't work ask to speak to the person's Supervisor about the problem. Be firm in stating your case to them.This is an obvious defect with the recorder and they should fix it outside of the warranty period.

    An update to my situatation, I was able to get the recorder fixed by a local authorized repair center for free by showing them the $90 repair authorization letter from Panasonic. This saved me the $40 expense and hassle of sending the recorder back to their main repair center in Elgin Illinois.
    Has anyone done this with success for the Philips DVDR985, which was universally bad?
    Some days it seems as if all I'm doing is rearranging deck chairs on the Titanic

  7. Member
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    Hello everyone,

    I just wanted to give you the scoop on my results of Panasonic DMR-ES10 trouble. Well, I decided to send it in to Panasonic, I just didn't want the headache anymore, and they said they would pay for shipping.

    As it turns out, they charge a 'flat fee' of $130 for any repair of this particular unit, ($100 repair, + $30 for the return shipping charges.)

    Though this was more than I wanted to pay, I had the unit back in 8 days. I shipped out on a Monday and had it back on my doorstep the following Tuesday. That was quick, all it took from me was a quick trip to UPS and they had a form pre-filled.

    Repair needed: They replaced the "Electrolytic Capacitor" - part # F2A1A821A540.

    I believe this confirms the same problem as some of your earlier units posted experiencing similar issues.

    Thank you SO MUCH to those of you who gave me tips- I expect this will probably happen again in a year so next time I will know exactly what to do. (Maybe I should just stock up on a few extra of these 'capacitors' so I'll have enough for the next 5 years, hahaha!)

    Anyway, I hope this info helps for some future people who encounter this same LAME issue!

    Ta-ta!
    Do you dream of a world where we assist our children in becoming the transforming elements leading to a harmonious and peaceful humanity? Find out more at http://montessoricentenary.org/

  8. Member
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    oh my , $130 to have panasonic to replace a $2 capacitor!!!
    For $160, you can buy a brand new ES20.
    Thanks for sharing your experience.

  9. Member
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    The Panasonic DMR-ES10 DVD recorder/player has a power supply problem due to a faulty capacitor (or more likely, a faulty capacitor design).
    The cap in question is on the power supply board, and has location number C1260. It is more or less in the middle of the board, close to a transformer. If power fails on your unit, this cap probably looks rounded on top (unlike good caps, like the others on the board, that are flat on top) and has some brown marks on the top (unlike good caps.)
    Panasonic Repair not only replaces this cap, but does an upgrade to the board. This consists of adding another cap (which is exactly the same as the other one), which should take some of the load and prevent the first cap from blowing out again. Look on the opposite side of C1260 from the transformer and there should be a label C1261 with no cap, but just a line with a symbol on it and holes on each end of the line labeled + and Ė . This is where the second cap goes.
    Having Panasonic do this will cost up to $130 plus shipping costs plus hassle. I replaced/added the caps myself, and it cost about $17, including tax and shipping, from Bradshaw Repair Service in Abingdon, IL. A guy named Les helped me a lot. Tel. 309-462-5703. I recommend using them, because they helped me troubleshoot, and for me, it was worth the markup from the Panasonic web source price. One phone call and you have the parts en route. Also, their labor charge, if you want to ship either just your power supply board or the whole unit and have them do it, is just $49. Or you can buy a whole new power supply board from them for $63.22 plus shipping.
    The cap part numbers for a given location number are not publicly available. For these two locations, C1260 and C1261 on this board, it is the same cap with part number F2A1A821A540.
    If you canít solder, get someone who can. Should be cheap and take only a few minutes.

  10. Electrolytic capacitors are amongst the highest failure parts in any design. They have lifetimes that seldom go out beyond about 6,000 operating hours at rated temperature.

    The advice above is good. Even if you replace these parts yourself, either get an exact replacement or buy it from the manufacturer of the recorder and pay the mark up because the designed in part is usually the right kind of part.

    These capacitors come in several types, generally 85 degree C. or 105 degree C. operating and standard and low inductance models. Get the 105 degree temperature, low inductance part; they are designed for switching power supplies. Standard parts might work but they will not filter as well even with the same capacitance and the 85 degree part will not as long.

    The good news is that they are usually inexpensive.

  11. Member
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    Originally Posted by LifeIsGd
    oh my , $130 to have panasonic to replace a $2 capacitor!!!
    For $160, you can buy a brand new ES20.
    Thanks for sharing your experience.
    Somebody needs a friendly retired electronics repairman stat!

  12. Member
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    Finally, I borrowed a soldering tool and paid $4 for one capacitor (820 uf/50V/105 degree; could not find 10V); mine is happily working again

    One tip:
    Unplug your electronics if not used for long period; In standby mode, the power unit is always working. This explains so many ES10 dies around the same time.

  13. Member
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    That Is AWESOME! A $4 repair instead of $130!!

    Where do you buy the $4 capacitor?

    (I am sure I will probably need to do this repair again 1 year from now.... 2 years from now... etc...)
    Do you dream of a world where we assist our children in becoming the transforming elements leading to a harmonious and peaceful humanity? Find out more at http://montessoricentenary.org/

  14. Member
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    Originally Posted by Explore Montessori
    That Is AWESOME! A $4 repair instead of $130!!

    Where do you buy the $4 capacitor?

    (I am sure I will probably need to do this repair again 1 year from now.... 2 years from now... etc...)
    I bought it from a local eletronics component store. It is a close match to the original one (original spec is 820uf/105degree/10V).

    Below you can get the exact match to the original one for $2; however, if it is the same kind as the failed one, then it will likely fail in one year also!!!

    https://www.ued.net/ued/addItems.do?itemCode=MSCF2A1A821A540

  15. Member
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    Just to add my experience with CD recorders in PCs:
    my first, an expensive unit from HP, burned about 40 CDs then the burner failed, although it continued to read CDs properly. My second, a cheap generic DVD-R CD-RW unit, burned about 100 then failed the same way. My dealer, an expert repair person, tells me that my experience is about average in his experience.

    I'd never buy a $300+ burner now without a trustworthy local multi-year warranty such as FutureShop gives.

  16. Banned
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    Now that says a lot about optical technology reliability. Great when it works but often after some time it dies. Generally it's piece of crap. You never know when it's going to blow up in your face.

  17. Member
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    Thanks so much to Bob108 for the extremely helpful post and to LifeIsGd for the link to the part. My unit died over Thanksgiving, and I went a-lookin' for help, and very quickly wound up here. I popped the lid, and there it was - the bum capacitor. Ordered the parts (two of 'em, as recommended), soldered them in place, and was back up running.

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    Hi everyone,
    Sadly i am back with not so good news. My player started erasing discs while finalizing them. I am so upset about the items that were lost because I can never get those back and they were especially important to me. One was 2 full days of a course that I had special permission from the trainer to record live. I had transferred them from a video camera (tapes have already been reused so now I have no no backup.)

    At first I thought I may have pushed a wrong button somewhere, so tried a few more finalizations and those were OK. but, then, the unit started making those moaning noises during another finalization, and then got stuck there and wouldn't stop spinning! No matter how many times I pushed stop on the unit and remote, it just kept making these crazy noises and would not complete the finalization process. I eventually had to unplug it. Then, it did a self check and said 'no read' or 'error' on the screen, despite that I had 6-8 hours of stuff on those discs beforehand!

    So, now Panasonic said they would repair and pay the shipping, but I would actually be happier if someone knows how to recover those discs. Please help if you can.
    Do you dream of a world where we assist our children in becoming the transforming elements leading to a harmonious and peaceful humanity? Find out more at http://montessoricentenary.org/

  19. Originally Posted by Explore Montessori
    (tapes have already been reused so now I have no no backup.)
    My advice: Never destroy the source material until the disc is done being written (that includes Finalization) and it tested to whatever level assures you that the burn is good. This should be at least fast-forwarding through the disc, and could be as much as running error rate tests with CDSpeed or DVDInfo.

    I hear that ISOBuster can make sense of unfinalized DVDs, allowing recovery of their contents.

  20. Member
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    Thanks bobkart, does ISO buster also apply to recovering burned DVD+R video CD's?

    When I put those 'ruined' CD's into the drawer of my Panasonic DMR-ES10, the screen says 'no read' or 'error' for one of them and won't even show me what's on the disc, and the other says it is blank: when I go to the 'direct navigator' screen it shows empty little screens/chapters where it used to show a frozen shot of each chapter beginning of the contents. Now it just looks like it's empty. And that's the CD that was most important to me.

    Also, I erased the original tape after having successfully burned the contents to the DVD last March. I have even watched portions of the CD several times, just never went through with finalization. I didn't realize finalization was important until I started having trouble with my player and realized I needed the disc to work on other players. After having the player fixed, I started finalizing my stacks of DVD's... then, about 12 discs or so into the process, the player/recorder started doing these weird things and erasing my contects rather than finalizing them! Ruined 3 of my important discs that had been playing and working just fine until then, in their unfinalized state. I was just trying to take that last 'security measure' and it did this to me instead. I am still in disbelief.
    Do you dream of a world where we assist our children in becoming the transforming elements leading to a harmonious and peaceful humanity? Find out more at http://montessoricentenary.org/

  21. Originally Posted by Explore Montessori
    Thanks bobkart, does ISO buster also apply to recovering burned DVD+R video CD's?
    I've never used it. I'm sure you'll find out once you try it.
    Originally Posted by Explore Montessori
    , just never went through with finalization.
    Hopefully now you know better.

    My blanks remain in a cake box until I am ready to, all at once, burn the content and finalize. None of this adding content over a period of time, and leaving it unfinalized. Fingerprints/dust may cause a problem during playback, but clearing the contamination will make it play again. Not so when recording and there is that kind of contamination. You're just screwed, unless you held onto the source material until you confirm the complete burn. The more you handle the disc before you finish burning it, the more opportunity for such contamination to get to it.

  22. my panny e80 lasted 3 years until the hard drive died. I replaced it with a 120gig of the exact model and so far it works fine. I burned at least 300 -R and about 60 or so RAM.

    word of warning, REMOVE stuff from your hard drive or lose it! I paid the price with years of clips etc that I lost. I now bought 50 RAM disks from panny for 60 bucks so i'll never have to keep stuff on there again.

  23. Originally Posted by normcar
    My Philips DVDR985 lasted less than a year, I had it "repaired" under the extended war. and it still didn't work. Even when it "worked" I had problems with everthing. The clock didn't even keep good time, it kept gaining about 30sec/day. I paid over $850 for it, and burned less than 50 DVDs with it. It was the worst purchase I have possibly ever made, and I have made some bad purchasing decisions. Philips made a sh*% product, and never backed it up with any recall of any kind. They can KMA (Kiss My ___). I will never purchase another Philips product, and will tell everyone I can not to either.
    I went through the exact same thing, with the exact same machine...It too was the worst purchase of my life. You're right, Philips never backed the product...So I figure it this way, I may be out $850 and a DVD recorder, but Philips lost me as a customer for ANY of their products in the future...Not to mention the fact that whenever anyone asks me what I think about Philips products, you know what I'll tell them!

  24. Member
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    Originally Posted by trhouse
    Electrolytic capacitors are amongst the highest failure parts in any design. They have lifetimes that seldom go out beyond about 6,000 operating hours at rated temperature.

    The advice above is good. Even if you replace these parts yourself, either get an exact replacement or buy it from the manufacturer of the recorder and pay the mark up because the designed in part is usually the right kind of part.

    These capacitors come in several types, generally 85 degree C. or 105 degree C. operating and standard and low inductance models. Get the 105 degree temperature, low inductance part; they are designed for switching power supplies. Standard parts might work but they will not filter as well even with the same capacitance and the 85 degree part will not as long.

    The good news is that they are usually inexpensive.
    A client just brought me a DMR-ES10 for repair that had a bulging C1260 and had a copy of some of these posts with him. It is great that people are willing to provide such useful information. This really did not help repair the unit, as the problem was pretty obvious, but it put me onto this forum, which I had not noticed previously.

    Just a few notes about the above. While it is mostly good and correct advice, there are a few finer points. First, the life rating for caps is for use at the rated temperature. Capacitors are almost never run at that temperature and most last many times the rated life at the lower, typical operating temperatures. In the case of these failures, Panasonic was probably sold a bad batch of caps.

    Also, the info regarding SMPS caps is correct. Impedance, or ESR, can be very important in caps that are used in the PRIMARY of a SMPS, where they may see operation at rather high frequencies. The caps that are failing here are on the secondary, after rectification, and are traditional filters on a d.c. line. These are not very critical in terms of impedance or ESR, but just need to be good quality and rated for a higher voltage than they will operate at. We always use 105 degree caps, but in this case it is not critical.

    These caps can be replaced with a larger capacitance, such as 1000 uF which are more common, and with a higher voltage rating. This should give the PS more headroom and improved reliability, though it is not likely necessary. It should be noted that much higher voltage caps will likely have higher ESR, but again, this is not terribly critical at this stage in the supply. Adding the parallel C1261 is OK and just gives more capacity to the supply. Just pay attention to the polarity when replacing them, if you DIY.

  25. Master of Time & Space Capmaster's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by trhouse
    Electrolytic capacitors are amongst the highest failure parts in any design
    True. And they're even worse when they're operated at their maximum rated voltage, as most are in consumer devices. Aluminum electrolytics go up in price and physical size when you increase the working voltage, for a given capacitance.

    A good conservative design will add a margin to the voltage rating of the parts - use in a 5V circuit would mean using a 6.8 or 7v part normally. In the consumer electronics world, their profit margin is so low they go for the bare minimum - a 5v circuit will mean using a 5.3v part. As long as it lasts the 90-day warranty period, they're happy.

  26. Member
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    Originally Posted by Capmaster
    Originally Posted by trhouse
    Electrolytic capacitors are amongst the highest failure parts in any design
    True. And they're even worse when they're operated at their maximum rated voltage, as most are in consumer devices. Aluminum electrolytics go up in price and physical size when you increase the working voltage, for a given capacitance.

    A good conservative design will add a margin to the voltage rating of the parts - use in a 5V circuit would mean using a 6.8 or 7v part normally. In the consumer electronics world, their profit margin is so low they go for the bare minimum - a 5v circuit will mean using a 5.3v part. As long as it lasts the 90-day warranty period, they're happy.
    It is rare for caps to be operated at their maximum rated voltage in consumer electronics. In this case the operating voltage on the caps is about 6.5vdc and the stock caps are rated at 10vdc. A conservative approach is to far exceed the nominal operating range with the maximum rating of the parts. It is common to find this and uncommon to find the tight tolerances that you describe. I have been servicing consumer electronics for many years and have likely changed thousands of capacitors. I can recall very few that were used as you describe.

    The problems with capacitors in most cases is simply bad batches or poor design in the manufacturing of the caps themselves, not poor application in the electronics. That is not to say that consumer electronics are always well built. That is far from true, but if we look at a hundred caps in an assortment of designs currently in use, the ratings would far exceed the normal operating voltage in nearly every one. I'd be surprised to find a single case of a margin of less than 10% that you described. Most 5v circuits use 10v or 16v caps.

    Misinformation leads to hysteria and perpetuation of myths. Please check your facts before posting.

  27. Member
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    Per original question, I have Samsung DVD-R130 which no longer plays anything except what it burned itself. So I guess the answer is, about six months.

  28. From Samsung, that's not surprising. Samsung is a highly problem prone company, it's not just DVD recorders.

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    Hi all,
    I just want to say that I have found your forum very helpful. I got exactly the same problem with electrolytic capacitor on my dmr-es10 Panasonic, well anyway the same symptoms. I am not willing to pay anything for repair if electrolytic capacitor cost about £1 here.
    I was wondering if someone could point me out in right direction, which is where I can find this failed capacitor inside the box? Itís to many of them and I am afraid that I wonít find it.
    Thanks in advance.

  30. After reading all these posts I don't feel so bad now.. I have had a Pioneer 510H since 2004, and have used it everyday since... I maybe burned 100+ DVD's..

    Well like alot of people I started having the dreded copy error when trying to burn/finalize DVD's.. I did purchase the extended warranty!! (only had 2 1/2 months left!!!)

    When I went in to the store I bought it in. They said they had to contact Pioneer ect... Well they strung me along for almost a month.. I figure they were trying to wait for my warranty to expire.
    I finally contacted Pioneer myself(thanks to people on this site for links..), and they said all I had to do was take it to a Pioneer Service Centre....Of course there are only a few of these around..I ended up paying to ship it to them(didn't want to deal with the store again!!), and I also paid for return shipping..

    Total cost for me was $40 bucks... Cost for the repair was well over $350 bucks...

    Long story short... I got my Recorder back, and it is running great again..

    Peace.




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