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  1. Are there any LCD TV's which have 1080p capability? Or have they not been released yet?
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  2. Member edDV's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by SilverBlade
    Are there any LCD TV's which have 1080p capability? Or have they not been released yet?
    Sure many have been shown and several are for sale. Here is an afforadable 42".
    http://www.crutchfield.com/S-ljHnbVyIzVB/cgi-bin/prodview.asp?i=647LVM42W2

    To get the benefit of 1080p, you need to sit close to the screen or go for a larger screen. The only current 1080p source is the HD DVD player. It is also possible to feed this one a 1920x1080 GUI desktop over VGA or DVI-D.
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    40" Samsung 1080p was just released. Gorgeous LCD. They run around $3000. Biggest difference between the Samsung and Westinghouse is that the Westinghouse has a poor deinterlacer and 1080i content like HDTV looks much better on the Samsung.

    There are also many Sharp AQUOS LCDs that have a 1080p resolution and accept 1080p via HDMI. I believe they're the D90U line.

    As for sources, BluRay is also out. You'ld have to get the Pioneer model though as the Samsung model doesn't output a true 1080p signal...it outputs a deinterlaced 1080i signal
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    Best Buy sells 2 Westinghouse TVs that do 1080p, but please note that they are only monitors. There is no tuner. You will need an external tuner or a cable box to use them. One of the TVs they sell is the same one as in the Crutchfield link above.

    I fully expect more and more TVs to come out as 1080p. Either the customers will demand or it will become the new hot "feature" that electronics stores can use to sell the brands that have it. "Sure that ACME Corporation TV is a fine TV, but it only does 720p. Don't you really want a 1080p TV for just $200 more? You can get a high definition DVD player in the future and watch your movies in full 1080p glory instead of having to watch them downconverted to 720p."
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  5. Member edDV's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by jman98
    Best Buy sells 2 Westinghouse TVs that do 1080p, but please note that they are only monitors. There is no tuner. You will need an external tuner or a cable box to use them. One of the TVs they sell is the same one as in the Crutchfield link above.

    I fully expect more and more TVs to come out as 1080p. Either the customers will demand or it will become the new hot "feature" that electronics stores can use to sell the brands that have it. "Sure that ACME Corporation TV is a fine TV, but it only does 720p. Don't you really want a 1080p TV for just $200 more? You can get a high definition DVD player in the future and watch your movies in full 1080p glory instead of having to watch them downconverted to 720p."
    That works if you are Best Buy. They get to sell you a $3000 TV, a $700 player and a new HD DVD library at $40 a pop.

    The key issue from the customer perspective is how these sets will display normal NTSC/PAL and their current VHS and DVD library. They are in for a dissappointment unless they select carefully.
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    The key issue from the customer perspective is how these sets will display normal NTSC/PAL and their current VHS and DVD library. They are in for a dissappointment unless they select carefully.
    Do you know of reasons why they would display "normal NTSC and current DVDs" worse than a 1080i or 720p television?

    Is there something inherent in the 1080p design that will disappoint users? Or perhaps something inherent in the whole progressive schema?
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  7. Member edDV's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by minko
    The key issue from the customer perspective is how these sets will display normal NTSC/PAL and their current VHS and DVD library. They are in for a dissappointment unless they select carefully.
    Do you know of reasons why they would display "normal NTSC and current DVDs" worse than a 1080i or 720p television?

    Is there something inherent in the 1080p design that will disappoint users? Or perhaps something inherent in the whole progressive schema?
    VHS, most MiniDV and most broadcast is interlace. So is 1080i HDTV.

    Ignoring film source material for the moment, only 720p broadcasts from ABC, ESPN and FOX are native progressive. Everthing else needs to be deinterlaced and upscaled to 1080p (1080i just needs deinterlace). So the picture quality for these legacy formats depends on the quality of the conversion processing built into the HDTV.

    Film based material can be more losslessly converted to progressive if the HDTV includes high end inverse telecine (IVTC) processing aka Cine processing. This converts telecined 29.97fps (interlace) material on the fly to 23.976fps progressive film rate. Then that is upscaled to 1920x1080 and frame repeated in a 2-3-2-3 sequence to 59.94fps to reduce flicker. This processing may or may not not work very well from VHS, NTSC broadcasts or home recorded DVD sources. When broadcasting goes fully digital, this equipment should work better with broadcast sources.

    Most commercial DVD is already progressive and can be upscaled from 720x480p using a progressive DVD player to 1920x1080p. Interlace DVD will need deinterlacing before or after upscale.

    BD/HD DVD will be mostly 1920x1080p/24 and will be frame repeated to play at 59.94 or 71.93fps for NTSC regions. PAL models will play at 48-50 or 96-100 FPS.

    So, it is about more than resolution. Progressive DVD, 720p and film sources should look good. Playback of legacy sources, 480i and 1080i depends on the quality of the processing. Lower end HD sets, even some 1080p models, don't have high end scaling or cine processing. Minimal processing is included but they must rely on the processing in a DVD player or cable tuner to get a quality picture.
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