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  1. Member
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    I have bought some tv shows from Itunes but now want to take the shows that I bought and make a DVD with them, is there a program out there to let me take Itunes video and export it to a DVD? I have been searching the net for such a program but all I can find are programs to convert video to play on my Ipod. Thanks for any help
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  2. I'm a MEGA Super Moderator Baldrick's Avatar
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    They are probably DRM protected and I haven't seen any apps that can remove it...Apple doesn't want users to convert the video to other formats.

    You could use your computer tv-out and connect to a dvd recorder and record it.

    Or buy the DVDs instead of buying itunes video...
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  3. The only way I know around DRM is with screen capture software.

    I use Replay Screencast by Applian Technologies to capture the video I want to burn.

    This results in a standard Windows Media WMV file.

    I then use Nero to convert to VCD, SVCD or DVD format to burn.
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    would have bought the DVD if it was out but its not, so I did it with the tv out, played it in full screen mode and recorded it to DVD, but someone really needs to make a program to rip it from itunes to make it eaiser, anyway until that happens itunes lost my business will just take them from bittorrent and edit out comercials to make a DVD.
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    somone sent me this and I was wondering if anyone has tried it, the program it uses is tunebite
    has anyone tried it?

    from what it looks like its basicly a high speed video/audio capture program that plays/rips your copy protected files at high speed and makes a new copy that is not protected.

    am going to try the free demo and let everyone know how it works..if anyone has the full version let us know if its worth it.

    http://www.topvideopro.com/guide/how_to_convert_protected_m4v_m4p_aa_m4b.htm
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    Here is what I found out about tunebite... from using the free demo version it works great for music from itunes however only does video at 320X240 so if you have some videos or shows from itunes it doesnt work for that at least not if you are trying to make a dvd from it. With music it strips the DRM off and makes you a new MP3, OGG, or WMA file with no copy protection... So should also work with any other service where you download songs like Napster, Yahoo Launch, or any other subscription service that doesnt let you use your music as you wish. Will keep searching and post any results I find here for video.
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  7. I downloaded the trial version of Tunebite too but when I saw that it would only do video at 320x240 I uninstalled it. The only reason I wanted it was for the video feature.

    I will stick with Replay Screencast for now since it is more versatile.

    The only copy protected music I have ever purchased is from iTunes and MusicMatch Jukebox. Every time I buy anything from them I burn it as an audio CD to a rewritable disc and turn around and rip it. The ripped file has no copy protection and I can use it any way I want.

    I use Audio Xtract Pro or Audacity (free) for streaming audio or for any other audio files that I can't burn as an audio CD to remove the copy protection.
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  8. Member Seeker47's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by jonas more
    I will stick with Replay Screencast for now since it is more versatile.
    There are or were some free tools for capturing streaming videos, including Streambox. Not having used any of these yet, I'm wondering: How do they compare with the program you are recommending ?
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  9. To be honest I haven't tried any other screen capture software besides Replay Screencast.

    I can't find any freeware that will record DRM protected video. I read somewhere that StreamBox won't record any video that is password protected.

    Does anyone know of any other free programs that will?
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  10. Member Seeker47's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by jonas more
    To be honest I haven't tried any other screen capture software besides Replay Screencast.
    I can't find any freeware that will record DRM protected video. I read somewhere that StreamBox won't record any video that is password protected.
    Does anyone know of any other free programs that will?
    These are the ones that are linked here in the Tools Section: https://www.videohelp.com/tools?s=39#39
    but I doubt this is a complete or exhaustive list. Of these -- besides Streambox -- I've heard of ASFRecorder, Net Transport, and WM / RM Recorder. There is something called Total Recorder, but the name appears to be misleading, as I believe it is only for audio streams.
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  11. VH Wanderer Ai Haibara's Avatar
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    Those are mostly for streaming internet video (usually Windows Media (WMV/ASF, such as mms: links), and RealMedia). I don't think any of them support recording Flash streams.

    iTunes video isn't streamed and is DRM-protected - at least, the video you buy from the iTunes Music Store. Video created, say, for the iPod by someone else won't have that problem. But the 'stream recording' software won't be able to do anything with the DRM-protected iTunes videos.
    If cameras add ten pounds, why would people want to eat them?
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  12. Member Seeker47's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Ai Haibara
    Those are mostly for streaming internet video (usually Windows Media (WMV/ASF, such as mms: links), and RealMedia). I don't think any of them support recording Flash streams.
    We overlooked a couple: what about CapturePad or CamStudio ? Just discovered these, and the writeup suggests they may do more.

    Originally Posted by Ai Haibara
    iTunes video isn't streamed and is DRM-protected - at least, the video you buy from the iTunes Music Store. Video created, say, for the iPod by someone else won't have that problem. But the 'stream recording' software won't be able to do anything with the DRM-protected iTunes videos.
    I'm not much interested in Itunes audio (since I don't Ipod) or Itunes video -- as others have pointed out, it's apparently a tiny, low-res image -- but I'm definitely interested in something that can record most types of video streams that might be incoming to the desktop . . . particularly if it's something they otherwise don't want to let you record. For example, a year or so ago there was a Preakness clip (this was after the event) that I tried to record, and since then various network newsclips. All I could get was several constituent pieces for each item, in some kind of data format. It seemed clear to me that someone who really knew what he was doing would know how to recombine the pieces back into whatever the clip was when it streamed to your desktop -- the original .AVI, .WMV, or etc. But that knowledgeable person sure ain't me !
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  13. VH Wanderer Ai Haibara's Avatar
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    We overlooked a couple: what about CapturePad or CamStudio ? Just discovered these, and the writeup suggests they may do more.
    I have to admit that I haven't tested capture-to-video utilities much... the last one I tried was that one from Microsoft... 'Camcorder,' or something like that, way back in Win9X's time.

    I'm not much interested in Itunes audio (since I don't Ipod) or Itunes video -- as others have pointed out, it's apparently a tiny, low-res image -- but I'm definitely interested in something that can record most types of video streams that might be incoming to the desktop . . . particularly if it's something they otherwise don't want to let you record. For example, a year or so ago there was a Preakness clip (this was after the event) that I tried to record, and since then various network newsclips. All I could get was several constituent pieces for each item, in some kind of data format. It seemed clear to me that someone who really knew what he was doing would know how to recombine the pieces back into whatever the clip was when it streamed to your desktop -- the original .AVI, .WMV, or etc. But that knowledgeable person sure ain't me !
    Well... you don't have to have an iPod to use iTunes (music or video). And, the quality of the video is subjective - as I mentioned in a post somewhere else, my sister has bought a few videos from the iTMS, for her iPod and viewing in iTunes, and they look decent enough on her monitor in the full-screen mode (her monitor is set somewhere over 1024x768).
    Of course, that may not look as good to other people. And, if you're wanting to convert to some other format, such as DVD, it's better to try other sources instead, as has been said.

    But all that's getting off the topic, now. To be honest, I prefer to try to get the original clip rather than capture it, but that's often a fairly more complicated process.
    If cameras add ten pounds, why would people want to eat them?
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