VideoHelp Forum

Try DVDFab and download streaming video, copy, convert or make Blu-rays,DVDs! Download free trial !
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 8 of 8
Thread
  1. Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    United States
    Search Comp PM
    I was wondering what would be a good CRT to use for restoration work...

    I'm sufficiently color-insensitive that I have to trust my display to be reasonably color-accurate. There seem to be quite a few aging but still functional broadcast CRTs out there that seem like excellent playback devices for proofing. I would think that having a quality viewing device is a critical part of restoration, after all why spend hundreds on detailers and procamps if the display device doesn't accurately display the image you're trying to tweak, right?

    My LCD flat panel computer monitor definitely doesn't cut it (I knew this beforehand) and my TV in the living room is neither close nor necessarily accurate. Whereas all those 13" and 14" old professional CRTs from yesteryear seem like more compelling options.

    Thoughts?
    Quote Quote  
  2. Member vhelp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    New York
    Search Comp PM
    I know I've said this before..

    The main problem is several-fold. But, I use my LCD for pretty
    much all my restoration/video work.

    IMHO, the three main ingrediants for a good setup:

    ** Video Graphics Card
    ** LCD (or CRT)
    ** Proper capture setup
    ** Codec decoding and Color Space setup

    1 - a good graphics card and with a proper Overlay Feature will
    give you excellent milage.

    2 - Nothing beats a good CRT monitor, but an LCD is just as good, if
    coupled with a good graphics card.

    3 - The last and final piece of important tip here is the method used
    to capture your source, followed by your system setup to import your
    video and display it on your given monitor (LCD or CRT) which requires
    a properly installed Codec, for Editors feature/ability to reproduce the
    video in the same color space, which is usually RGB.

    Most editors display the video in an RGB color space. 0-255 is the
    tipicle color range for RGB. But, there is also a Studio RGB (or, sRGB)
    that uses a 16-235 color range. And, each color range *should* match
    the same "captured source" color range setup.

    In other words.. if you capture a given source, and setup for an IRE 0.0
    color range (16-235) then your editor (per your properly installed codec)
    should be set to display the video source as IRE 0.0 / 16-235 color range.

    I use IRE 0.0 for all my capture (despite what another user here believes)

    Part of the problem with some of you users, is that you are using the
    wrong IRE setting. That is my opinion. Dispite the numbers, the proper
    way of setting up a capture is to setup for IRE 0.0 (NTSC)

    If I have to, I'll talk some more on this later tomorrow. I'm too tired.
    And, I'm sure someone else will dismiss what I have noted above
    But I'm too tired.. See you later, maybe.

    -vhelp 3815
    Quote Quote  
  3. Member edDV's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Northern California, USA
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by swiego
    I was wondering what would be a good CRT to use for restoration work...

    I'm sufficiently color-insensitive that I have to trust my display to be reasonably color-accurate. There seem to be quite a few aging but still functional broadcast CRTs out there that seem like excellent playback devices for proofing. I would think that having a quality viewing device is a critical part of restoration, after all why spend hundreds on detailers and procamps if the display device doesn't accurately display the image you're trying to tweak, right?

    My LCD flat panel computer monitor definitely doesn't cut it (I knew this beforehand) and my TV in the living room is neither close nor necessarily accurate. Whereas all those 13" and 14" old professional CRTs from yesteryear seem like more compelling options.

    Thoughts?
    Pro editing software like Adobe Premiere, Apple Final Cut Pro, Avid and Sony Vegas all support video monitoring from the IEEE-1394 port. A DV camcorder or DV transcoder is used to feed the analog video monitor. This is standard practice for DV editing. DVD MPeg2, DV, HDV, DTV and YUV over SDI all are calibrated the same.

    SDI (uncompressed) PCI cards usually have provision for monitoring off the card.

    Monitor calibration is important and test signals are provided.

    There is a new class of broadcast LCD monitor panels that are capable of broadcast quality calibration but they tend to be expensive.

    Graphics display card overlay settings are notoriously difficult to calibrate.
    Recommends: Kiva.org - Loans that change lives.
    http://www.kiva.org/about
    Quote Quote  
  4. Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Oregon, USA
    Search Comp PM
    A more "quick and dirty" way of doing it (and it does involve calibrating through the video overlay) would be to use a small TV that could fit on your desk. Most small CRT's don't have a very good picture, nor do they have the proper inputs, but the one I use and love is this:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E16824207004

    It's a little large at 14" but built fairly compactly, It has a flat screen, S-Video, Component, and Composite video inputs, excellent color and a really decent picture. I watch everything I convert from VHS (old home movies and some TV stuff) on a regular TV anyways, so it gives me a much better idea of the color situation then does my computer's monitor.

    It's helped me a ton -- and makes the job of converting MUCH quicker. I too considered getting an old display -- many people talk about the early 1980's Commodore 64 (model 1702 I believe) monitors as being great to use for VHS video restoration, but this is more readily available and not at a bad price either.
    Quote Quote  
  5. Member BrainStorm69's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Texas, USA
    Search Comp PM
    I've thought about buying that Toshiba many times myself. It's available at Best Buy and Fry's and is about $40 bucks cheaper than the 14 in. flat Sony.
    Quote Quote  
  6. I use a high res (800x600) 14" Sony Trinitron GVM-1311Q medical grade CRT color monitor (which has the same picture tube as their very expensive BVM series broadcast monitors). Great for near field project work. Far superior to a consumer TV of the same size.
    Quote Quote  
  7. I use a SONY PVM-14M4U --- you can't skimp on the monitor...??? BIG MISTAKE!

    Here is the 20" version :

    http://cgi.ebay.com/SONY-PVM-20M4U-NTSC-PAL-20-COLOR-VIDEO-MONITOR-W-16-9_W0QQitemZ759...QQcmdZViewItem

    Richard
    Quote Quote  
  8. Banned
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Canada
    Search Comp PM
    I'm still in CRT domain with 2 Samsungs 19' and 2 Sony's (1x 19' and 1 is a multisystem 14 inch) simply excellent. No LCD's here (outside of laptop that I'm sitting on now), still don't like the way LCD's display images.
    Quote Quote  



Similar Threads