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  1. Member
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    what's the difference and which is better?
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  2. Member yoda313's Avatar
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    Here's the perfect cnet article for you (1080i vs 1080p)

    http://reviews.cnet.com/4520-6449_7-6361600.html

    1. 1080p defined
    1080p resolution--which equates to 1,920x1,080 pixels--is the latest HD Holy Grail. That's because 1080p monitors are theoretically capable of displaying every pixel of the highest-resolution HD broadcasts.


    2. Why 1080p is theoretically better than 1080i
    1080i, the former king of the HDTV hill, actually boasts an identical 1,920x1,080 resolution but conveys the images in an interlaced format (the i in 1080i).


    The full article goes into more detail.
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  3. Member edDV's Avatar
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    1080i (plus some 720p) is mostly what is being boadcast or carried on HD cable. Most HDTV sets receive 1080i but display at some lower resolution.

    1080p is the top of the line for display, but is not currently being broadcast. 1080p capable TV sets cost $5k up ($4k up for DLP projection) but will come down in coming years.

    1080p will be supported by the next generation HD DVD players.
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    Best Buy had a 37" Westinghouse 1080p LCD monitor for $1500 or $1800 on Black Friday. I don't think too many bought one though because there isn't a use for 1080p yet, at least that I have heard on the consumer end.
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  5. Member edDV's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by sullen
    Best Buy had a 37" Westinghouse 1080p LCD monitor for $1500 or $1800 on Black Friday. I don't think too many bought one though because there isn't a use for 1080p yet, at least that I have heard on the consumer end.
    I would make sure the other features are adequate before chasing 1080p.

    Are you sure that set had 1080p native resolution? Do you have a model number?

    Added: I guess this is it. I would be concerned about only 1000:1 contrast for home theater application.
    http://www.audioholics.com/news/pressreleases/Westinghouse37LCD1080p.php
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  6. Member Conquest10's Avatar
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    Yup, it was only in certain markets for $1499.99 and it is 1080p native. Me, I wouldn't go near an LCD.
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  7. Member edDV's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Conquest10
    Yup, it was only in certain markets for $1499.99 and it is 1080p native. Me, I wouldn't go near an LCD.
    By this time next year there will be some very good and affordable large screen LCD HDTV displays. 46" 1366-by-768 is looking good as a price leader. Maybe as low as sub $1000.
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  8. Banned
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    I'm slightly confused by this
    http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?BV_SessionID=@@@@1883214601.1133135435@@@@&B...&vertical=ELEC
    Mitsubishi also uses a high-speed video processor called Plush1080pô that upconverts 1080i signals to 1080p producing 4 times the resolution of traditional line doublers.
    Upconverting 1080i to 1080p is only doubling.
    Sounds like the marketing strategy is to co an apples and oranges comparison.
    I quickly saw this set at Sears a few months ago. It looked really nice. Sadly when I walked in I asked the sales guy if they had any 1080p sets and he had no idea. He said he "knew the basics and anything else I could look up online". Idiot.
    Anyone know more about this set? Being DLP does it have the problems mentioned above?
    I'm also a little worried about bulb life. My set runs around 16 hours daily everyday now.
    Bulb life at that rate looks like a couple of months.
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  9. Member edDV's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by GullyFoyle
    I'm slightly confused by this
    http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?BV_SessionID=@@@@1883214601.1133135435@@@@&B...&vertical=ELEC
    Mitsubishi also uses a high-speed video processor called Plush1080pô that upconverts 1080i signals to 1080p producing 4 times the resolution of traditional line doublers.
    Upconverting 1080i to 1080p is only doubling.
    Sounds like the marketing strategy is to co an apples and oranges comparison.

    First "line doubling" isn't what it seems like to most people.

    1080i is 59.94 fields per second (29.97 frames per second). This is what is broadcast.

    "line doubling" will interpolate the missing lines from field 1 using a combination of samples from field 1 and field 2 and field 1 minus 1/60 sec and field 2 minus 1/60 second. And it will do the same to field 2 so the result is 59.94 frames per second (or 1080 progressive).

    So bottom line, "line doubling" does double the lines in each field.

    The marketing hype adds "producing 4 times the resolution of traditional line doublers". I guess they are assuming traditional line doublers only had 960 horizontal pixels or equivalent.

    To be clear, 1080i (or 720p) to 1080p is an upconversion. 1080i needs to add artificial motion detail, 720p needs to scale size.
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    Out of curiosity, is PAL 1080i equivilant to 1080p for movies and US tv shows?
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  11. [url=http]text[/url] Denvers Dawgs's Avatar
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    Ok so if i were to buy a tv today what do I want for best picture/experience

    1080p or 1080i?
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  12. Member edDV's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by minchjp
    Out of curiosity, is PAL 1080i equivilant to 1080p for movies and US tv shows?
    Background:

    1080p/24 fps film transfers exist as databases in the transfer vaults of the movie studios. New transfers from 35mm and 70mm prints are being done to 4Kx4K/24 and 4Kx2K/24 "digital cinema" for movie theater release. In the process, a 1920x1080p/24 database is maintained for release to television and High Def DVD (future Blu Ray and HD DVD releases will be native 1080p/24).

    TV networks order 1920x1080i/29.97fps (North America) or 1280x720p/59.94fps (North America) or 1920x1080i/25fps (PAL areas) tapes for current HDTV broadcast.

    DVD publishers order 720x480p/23.976fps (North America) or 720x576/25fps (PAL areas) for current DVD relaease.

    1080p to the home:

    This will happen with the release of the BluRay and HD DVD formats. The data on the DVD will be native 1080p. Player outputs will be 1080p, 720p, 1080i, 480/576p, and 480/576i digital (HDCP encryption required) or analog 480/576p or 480/576i (like current DVD*).

    Nobody is broadcasting 1080p/24. The USA ATSC standard permits 1080p/24 and tuners are eventually required to receive it but this is unlikely to happen for many years in reality.

    So why buy a 1080p HDTV?

    1080p will be the highest home resolution for some time. The only likely source for 1080p will be the future BluRay and HD DVD players.

    A native 1080p display will require everything else (e.g. 1080i, 720p, DVD, NTSC/PAL, etc.) to be upconverted. The overall experience will rest on the quality of the internal upconverters for everything except viewing HD DVD. The quality of the first generation upconverters is likely to be poor to OK. As time goes on, upconverters will improve. Also, the price of 1080p displays will drop sharply.

    Originally Posted by Denvers Dawgs
    Ok so if i were to buy a tv today what do I want for best picture/experience

    1080p or 1080i?
    For today, my favorites are 1080i/480p CRT or 720p (LCD, DLP or Plasma). I view today's sets as stepping stones much like 386/486 PC computers (before Pentium). Today we watch 60 to 90% analog or digital SD material. The curent set needs to look good for standard TV. As time goes on and HDTV content increases, these sets will be quickly replaced or moved to the bedroom when better-cheaper-larger models arrive.


    * many early adopter HDTV owners like me are furious that HDCP encryption at the monitor will be required to view any HD resolutions from the new Blu-Ray and HD DVD players. We bought "HD Ready" sets but they won't allow us to view these new DVDs in HD. Class action lawsuits are sure to result. There is talk of a compromise at 540p (quarter resolution of 1080p) for analog component viewing of HD DVD discs.
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  13. Member shelbyGT's Avatar
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    I consider myself somewhat of a smart guy, but even trying to figure out the ins and outs of TV's is getting ridiculous. We should be able to go in a store, say "hey, I want a TV that can play HD". Sure... they all do. Not this well... what's your native resolution? do you want it to upconvert?... blah blah... too many damn nitpicky things. Just make the picture look good.
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