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  1. Member
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    Has anyone here had success taking a 1080i HDTV capture and converting it to DVD-compliant 720x480p? The 1080i to 480p conversions I've done so far have had jitter during horizontal pans on the final DVD-RW.

    The only guide I've seen on this is at vidphiles.com and uses avisynth, which is all Greek to me.

    Here's the method I've used on two episodes of CSI. Maybe someone can tell me what I'm doing wrong:

    1. FusionHDTV records HD broadcast as 1920x1080i 29.97fps .mpg file.

    2. Edit commercials with VideoRedoPlus, save as shorter 1920x1080i .mpg file.

    3. Load edited 1920x1080i .mpg file into VirtualDubMod, extract the 5.1 channel .ac3 file.

    4. For video, load "DG smart deinterlace" filter (*not* the deinterlace filter that comes with Vdub), start frameserver.

    5. Load the edited/deinterlaced 1920x1080 .vdr.avi file into TMPGEnc Plus, encode to non-interlace 720x480 29.97fps .m2v file.

    6. Load the .m2v and .ac3 files into TMPGEnc DVD Author, burn DVD-RW.

    7. Put DVD-RW into DVD player, marvel at excellent picture detail on scenes with little or no movement, curse at jitter during pans.

    Can anyone provide suggestions to get rid of the jitter?

    Thanks...
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  2. Member edDV's Avatar
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    Have you tried skipping the deinterlace step and just go 1080i to 480i? The HDTV deinterlacer may do a better job. Worth a try.

    I've done the TS stream to 480i and 480p with some success but it is so time consuming I'm willing to live with real time encoding off my 1080i cable box S-video output to 480i via the Canopus ADVC.

    Most of what I record is off the encrypted cable channels anyway.
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    Thanks Ed, another quick (maybe) question....

    Since these CSI episodes are film telecined to NTSC, maybe I should be doing an inverse telecine? I did a search on the topic and, while most of what I read was Greek, I did manage to see it takes a telecined 30fps mpeg and recreates the original 24fps progressive source from it. I also saw that if one doesn't do IVTC on a telecined film, jerky pans can be the result.

    I've seen a few CSI episodes in XviD format and they were 23.976fps with zero jitter. I'm guessing that's the target I should shoot for, too?

    Sadly though, I did not see any official guides here on how to use Inverse Telecine and in TMPGEnc Plus it's pretty confusing.

    On the Video tab, the "encode mode" menu has a choice for "inverse 3:2 pulldown." And on the Advanced tab, there's a checkbox for "inverse telecine - convert to 24fps, flicker prioritized."

    Can you (or anyone else for that matter) tell me which of those two things to use? Or should I use both?

    Does it matter that the advanced filter for inverse telecine above says "24fps" when the apparent correct rate is 23.976?

    Sorry for what are probably stupid newbie questions, but as far as converting HDTV, I'm feeling like a newbie again.

    Thanks...
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  4. Member Soopafresh's Avatar
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    http://www.doom9.org/ivtc-tut.htm


    BTW, you should learn some basics of AviSynth. The quality of the Avisynth plugins are noticeably better than VirtualDub's (no dissing Vdub, BTW). You can also encode significantly faster using DGindex-->AviSynth.AVS-->Mpeg2 encoder than you can with Vdub frameserving.
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  5. Member edDV's Avatar
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    Well I will tell you what I know and let others add their 2 cents.

    Theatrical films are shot in 24fps (projected at 48fps) and when released on a commercial NTSC DVD, are encoded as 23.976fps with data separated into interlaced fields. The DVD player will create either a "3:2 pulldown" 59.94 field per second 480i interlace stream or combine fields into 24fps progressive frames and output those at 59.94 frames per second using a 3:2 frame repeat sequence for 480p output. More detail here:

    http://www.dvdfile.com/news/special_report/production_a_z/3_2_pulldown.htm

    TV series follow a different and more "diverse" path.

    TV series lile CSI are shot on either 24 or 30 frame per second film. Since 30 fps is more expensive, it is usually used only for effects intensive shows. 24fps film material is color corrected and transferred (telecined) to uncompressed 10 bit SMPTE 259-M 480i usuallly recorded on Digital Betacam for subsequent editing. In editing, the film sourced material may be combined with normal video or filtered as 480i so there is no guarantee the 3:2 telecine sequence will be either respected or preserved into the the final edit.

    Bottom line: Theatrical films are more pure transfers and may allow successful IVTC. TV series are an unknown quantity and IVTC techniques may or may not produce a progressive stream. IVTC errors are quite unpleasant. To do it right you would need to closely evaluate the video scene by scene. I for one refuse to make the effort. 480i is good enough for me.
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  6. Hi-

    Since these CSI episodes are film telecined to NTSC, maybe I should be doing an inverse telecine? I did a search on the topic and, while most of what I read was Greek, I did manage to see it takes a telecined 30fps mpeg and recreates the original 24fps progressive source from it. I also saw that if one doesn't do IVTC on a telecined film, jerky pans can be the result.

    There you have it. Your jerky pans are a result of combining deinterlacing with no IVTC. Kind of basic stuff, actually. Either keep it interlaced or IVTC it. Soopafresh is right. If you're serious about it, and don't plan on using the mass production methods of edDV (no offense intended), you have to learn AviSynth and IVTC. There are several IVTC filters available for AviSynth, and some work better on some sources, while others work better on other sources, although Decomb is perhaps the most popular. In addition, as soopafresh also said, by feeding your encoder an AviSynth script, the encoding will go faster. Since you've seen AVIs of CSI at 23.976, then I don't guess it's going to be all that difficult, although edDV is correct in saying that some TV series can be tough to IVTC because of the often screwy editing they do. But unless there's 30fps CGI material in there, they can all be IVTC'd successfully. In addition, by IVTCing to 23.976fps, you'll be encoding 20% fewer frames when compared to 29.97fps, giving you better quality for the same file size.

    To do it right you would need to closely evaluate the video scene by scene.

    I strongly disagree with that statement. Since you're on record as calling those that use AviSynth "a cult", and have evidently never used it yourself for IVTC or anything else, I don't know where you get off making statements like that. Sure, you have to examine your source carefully, and perhaps make a trial run on a short section, but once you know what you're dealing with, and the best IVTC filter for the job, you can just let it do its work.
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    Just tried that same episode with the automatic IVTC in TMPGenc. Pans don't jitter anymore, but individual moving people and objects do when they didn't before.

    Guess I'll start trying to learn AVIsynth. Thanks for the advice, ever'body...
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    Okay, got AVISynth 2.5 installed and downloaded the plugins mentioned at http://www.vidphiles.com

    I'm trying to use the avs script and guide there for 1080i sources -- with a couple of appropriate changes for the file locations on my system. I commented out the line for delaying the audio since DGIndex took care of that (I think). I also commented out the lines about removing borders and adding new ones:

    #AVS Script for 1080i or other resolution interlaced source

    #Load the MPEG2DEC3 and Decomb plugins.
    #Mine are located in c:\Program Files\AVISynth 2.5\plugins\
    LoadPlugin("c:\Program Files\AVISynth 2.5\plugins\decomb521.dll")
    LoadPlugin("c:\Program Files\AVISynth 2.5\plugins\mpeg2dec3dg.dll")

    #Load the video and audio files.
    video = "CSI.d2v" audio = "CSI.ac3"

    #IVTC the video
    video = video.Telecide().Decimate(cycle=5)
    #If the video is native NTSC, not NTSCFilm use this line instead:
    #FieldDeinterlace()

    #Delay the audio (to sync audio and video if needed)
    #Here I delay the audio by 500ms or half a second
    #audio = audio.DelayAudio(0.5)

    #Crop out excess black borders.
    #In this case, 1 from the left, 2 from top,
    #3 from right, and 4 from the bottom.
    #video = video.Crop(1,2,-3,-4)

    #Resize the video to make it complient for end product specs.
    #For PAL SVCD spec:
    #video = video.BicubicResize(480,576)
    #For NTSC SVCD spec:
    #video = video.BicubicResize(480,480)
    #For PAL DVD spec:
    #video = video.BicubicResize(704,576)
    #video = video.AddBorders(8,0,8,0)
    #For NTSC DVD spec:
    video = video.BicubicResize(720,480)
    #video = video.AddBorders(8,0,8,0)

    #Interleave the video and audio together.
    av = AudioDub(video,audio)

    #Return the video/audio
    return av


    Upon loading into VirtualdubMod (per the directions at vidphiles.com), I get "script error: invalid arguments to function telecide, line 12." The guide makes no mention of what to put there. Suggestions? And can you folks spot any other problems with this script I might encounter once I solve the error on line 12?

    Also, do I really need to load the audio at all, since I wasn't planning to interleave the a/v back together again until the authoring stage?

    And since TMPGEnc can load AVS files directly, do I really need to load the avs into VirtualDub first?

    The focus of this thread seems to be shifting from "DTV" to "advanced encoding." Maybe it's time for a friendly moderator to move this thread?

    Thanks again, all!
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  9. Hi-

    video = video.Telecide().Decimate(cycle=5)

    You've got an old script for a newer version of Decomb. Decomb 5.2.1 requires that you set the field order. For DVD the order is almost always Top Field First (Order=1). For DV, it's usually Bottom Field First (Order=0). I have no idea what it is for HD caps, or even if there is a usual order. If the order is TFF, the script would be revised to:

    video = video.Telecide(Order=1,Guide=1).Decimate(cycle=5)

    Read the DecombTutorial.html for help in determining the field order. Also read the DecombReferenceManual.html. In addition, your mpeg2dec3dg.dll is old. Don't change now, but you should get an up to date version of DGIndex and DGDecode.dll (included in the DGMPEGDec package) found here:

    http://neuron2.net/dgmpgdec/dgmpgdec.html

    I commented out the line for delaying the audio since DGIndex took care of that (I think).

    No, it doesn't. It just tells you what the delay is. You have to account for the delay yourself, either at the authoring stage, or earlier with something like AC3 Delay Corrector (or in that script).

    Also, do I really need to load the audio at all, since I wasn't planning to interleave the a/v back together again until the authoring stage?

    No, skip the lines referring to the audio, and do it the way you always do.

    And can you folks spot any other problems with this script I might encounter once I solve the error on line 12?

    In my opinion:

    video = video.BicubicResize(720,480)

    is a lousy resizer. I much prefer LanczosResize, and others prefer Lanczos4Resize. Also, I thought that for TMPGEnc you had to add the line:

    ConvertToRGB24()

    into the script. But since I don't use TMPGEnc, I'm not real sure. If TMPGEnc chokes on your script after being checked out in VDubMod, maybe go back and add that line.

    And since TMPGEnc can load AVS files directly, do I really need to load the avs into VirtualDub first?

    It's an important way to test your script before giving it to the encoder. I don't know whether or not TMPGEnc gives you error messages, but CCE sure doesn't. Until you get the hang of this, always check your script in VDubMod first. In addition to just opening it, also scroll around to various parts of the file, advance a frame at a time to check that the video looks OK, and that the IVTC is performing the way you expect. Check File->File Information for the framerate, to make sure it's really 23.976fps. Some HD broadcasts are at 59.94fps, and if so, you'll have to add another line to the script to get it down to 23.976fps. After the script checks out, then go ahead and close VDubMod and open your script in TMPGEnc.

    More links:

    http://www.avisynth.org/
    http://forum.doom9.org/showthread.php?t=32575
    http://forum.doom9.org/showthread.php?t=78797

    Plenty of reading to keep you busy while you're encoding. Good luck.
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  10. Member edDV's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by manono
    Hi-

    Since these CSI episodes are film telecined to NTSC, maybe I should be doing an inverse telecine? I did a search on the topic and, while most of what I read was Greek, I did manage to see it takes a telecined 30fps mpeg and recreates the original 24fps progressive source from it. I also saw that if one doesn't do IVTC on a telecined film, jerky pans can be the result.

    ... If you're serious about it, and don't plan on using the mass production methods of edDV (no offense intended), you have to learn AviSynth and IVTC. ...,

    although edDV is correct in saying that some TV series can be tough to IVTC because of the often screwy editing they do. But unless there's 30fps CGI material in there, they can all be IVTC'd successfully. In addition, by IVTCing to 23.976fps, you'll be encoding 20% fewer frames when compared to 29.97fps, giving you better quality for the same file size.
    "Mass production methods" as in time shifting for viewing later? I'm not doing a restoration requiring 12+ hours per hour of material, I'm realtime encoding and watching it later. DVD authoring adds maybe 20min to realtime.

    If I was doing this as a business, I would be going slow and evaluating frame by frame.

    Originally Posted by manono
    To do it right you would need to closely evaluate the video scene by scene.

    I strongly disagree with that statement. Since you're on record as calling those that use AviSynth "a cult", and have evidently never used it yourself for IVTC or anything else, I don't know where you get off making statements like that. Sure, you have to examine your source carefully, and perhaps make a trial run on a short section, but once you know what you're dealing with, and the best IVTC filter for the job, you can just let it do its work.
    I have used AviSynth and other filtering techniques when I deem the need. Those who think this must be done for time shifting are not only a "cult" but should just get a life ! My main arguement with the AVISynth community is with the quality of the deinterlacing filters (not IVTC) that are routinely used to screw up perfectly good interlaced video.

    TV Series editing is a mix of film and native video. The online post houses have zero respect for maintaining a path for IVTC to progressive conversion. They will use whatever native video and 480i filters that are required to get the job done for 480i release. This increasingly true as you go back in time. New series are edited for interlace and progressive release. Yes, if you want a "perfect" IVTC deinterlace you need to look scene by scene. If you want to apply IVTC to the whole program, expect screwed up frames in bumpers intros and where online filtering is applied including most composites. The more techie the show, the more this will be a problem but many composites are meant to be invisible (e.g. for reframing or fixing a bad raw film shoot).
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    Robert,
    can you post a link to that DG filter please ?
    I cant seem to access any of the websites for this guys.

    Thanks
    -martin
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    Martin,

    Sorry I'm not currently at the PC where I have it bookmarked. But it was a link at the bottom of the page at http://www.vidphiles.com which was where I got the script from, too.

    Manano,

    I retyped the telecide line per your reply above, but I still get the same error message about invalid arguments? Also, I'll eventually want to do some 720p broadcasts, which as you've noted will need an extra line in the script. Would you know what that line might be? There's a script for 720p at vidphiles.com but if the 1080i script is any indicator, the 720p script is probably out of date, too.

    Oh, I downloaded the newest beta version of Gspot and ran the 1080i mpg through it. It said the mpg is top field first (my older Gspot didn't offer this function). When I tried TMPGEnc's auto IVTC, TMPGEnc had detected the file as bottom field first. I've now switched it and am doing a TMPGEnc IVTC encode again (with a low CBR just as a test for jitter) while I keep trying to figure out this AVIsynth stuff. I'll post the results when done.

    Thanks all!
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  13. OK, try this. Break down your script as simply as possible, comment out everything but what's necessary to open it in VDubMod, and then add things back one at a time until you diagnose the problem. This is the usual procedure when trying to figure out what's going wrong:

    LoadPlugin("c:\Program Files\AVISynth 2.5\plugins\decomb521.dll")
    LoadPlugin("c:\Program Files\AVISynth 2.5\plugins\mpeg2dec3dg.dll")
    Mpeg2Source("C:\Path\To\CSI.d2v")
    #Telecide(Order=1,Guide=1).Decimate(cycle=5)
    #BicubicResize(720,480) #Is it already 720x480? If so, no need to resize.

    If that works (fill in the path to CSI.d2v), then remove the "#" from in front of Telecide/Decimate, save it, and then open that in VDubMod. Also, anything in the AviSynth Plugins folder doesn't really have to be loaded, as it loads automatically whenever you open VDubMod, but you can wait a bit before commenting out those lines.

    edDV- Anything that started life as film can be IVTC'd back to film, even after edits that break the cadence (although perhaps Decomb isn't the best IVTC to use in those cases). If there's some true 30fps interlaced video in there, then it's not 100% film. And of late some of the broadcasters have begun removing fields in order to cut the playing time so they can stick in more commercials. That kind of material is extremely difficult to return to 24fps, but I haven't seen enough of it to be sure one way or another if it can be IVTC'd. I work with DVDs which are often 7-8 GB in size, and I'm compressing them to DVDR. Often IVTC helps a lot in maintaining quality. I was serious that no insults were intended with my remark about your mass production methods. I was referring to your previous statements that you archive a whole lot of shows. You've said before that you capture and author, often with no further manipulation. Fine. Perhaps Robert Simandl will wind up doing that anyway, I don't know.

    I'm not doing a restoration requiring 12+ hours per hour of material,

    Neither am I, nor is anyone else I know.

    martin3361-I'm not exactly sure which DG filter you're looking for (he has a bunch), but the chances are good that you can find it at that neuron2 site I linked in my previous post.
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    Originally Posted by Robert Simandl
    Martin,

    Sorry I'm not currently at the PC where I have it bookmarked. But it was a link at the bottom of the page at http://www.vidphiles.com which was where I got the script from, too.
    Sweet,
    got it, wow, this sucker adds another hour of processing on the cpu !
    but looks gooooood.


    Ok, tried it but the damn .m2v video is still accelerated.
    argh !! I have this problem that after the demux of .ts my .m2v (even the 1080i) plays back accelerated. U guys know how to fix that crap ?
    Just to be sure, what frame rate is the DVD ?

    Thanks
    -martin
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  15. Member edDV's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by manono

    edDV- Anything that started life as film can be IVTC'd back to film, even after edits that break the cadence (although perhaps Decomb isn't the best IVTC to use in those cases). If there's some true 30fps interlaced video in there, then it's not 100% film. And of late some of the broadcasters have begun removing fields in order to cut the playing time so they can stick in more commercials. That kind of material is extremely difficult to return to 24fps, but I haven't seen enough of it to be sure one way or another if it can be IVTC'd. I work with DVDs which are often 7-8 GB in size, and I'm compressing them to DVDR. Often IVTC helps a lot in maintaining quality. I was serious that no insults were intended with my remark about your mass production methods. I was referring to your previous statements that you archive a whole lot of shows. You've said before that you capture and author, often with no further manipulation. Fine. Perhaps Robert Simandl will wind up doing that anyway, I don't know.

    I'm not doing a restoration requiring 12+ hours per hour of material,

    Neither am I, nor is anyone else I know.
    I have no arguement with films that are broadcast from a clean transfer. We were talking about TV series here like CSI (pre HDTV) where the studio scenes were done in film, but all of the effects compositing was done in 480i uncompressed. My point is those sections along with the bumpers, credits etc. will not survive IVTC without compromise. Effects composites are often not easily anticipated because they are used most often in a show like that to fix studio shot errors.

    To my eye those errors leap out. Maybe others don't notice. BTW, just one of those field drop errors will get pro work rejected.
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    Well, seems letting TMPGEnc do the IVTC specifying Top Frame First instead of Bottom Frame First did the trick. Authored and burned the m2v and 5.1 channel ac3 to a DVD-RW and it looks fabulous on my HDTV.

    In fact if I told your average Joe Sixpack he was watching an HD broadcast I don't think he'd even be able to tell it was a DVD (though of course people on this forum would see the resolution difference).

    This thing looks so good now that I'm noticing a bit of jitter on the DVD's I made from 720p sources that I hadn't noticed before. Maybe I need to start another thread about that....

    Thanks all for steering me in the right direction vis-a-vis IVTC.
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  17. I have this problem that after the demux of .ts my .m2v (even the 1080i) plays back accelerated. U guys know how to fix that crap ?
    Just to be sure, what frame rate is the DVD ?


    All NTSC DVDs are 29.97fps, often telecined from 23.976fps stored on the DVD. It sounds to me like you have a 59.94fps .ts file. To be sure, open it in DGIndex and run the Preview. If that's true, you have to cut the framerate in half before applying IVTC (if that's what you're doing). And if using AviSynth, then before the IVTC, you stick in:

    SelectEven()
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    Those 720p 59.94 ts files are (in theory anyway) already progressive, not interlaced. After cutting the frame rate down to 29.97, that would leave us with a 29.97fps progressive file. Would that change how the IVTC is done from there? Thanks...
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  19. Member edDV's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Robert Simandl
    Those 720p 59.94 ts files are (in theory anyway) already progressive, not interlaced. After cutting the frame rate down to 29.97, that would leave us with a 29.97fps progressive file. Would that change how the IVTC is done from there? Thanks...
    In most cases where 720p 59.94 progressive frames is the result, the conversion from 24fps was done by repeating full frames in a 3:2 sequence, NOT by traditional telecine field repeat techniques.

    You should NOT halve the frames and apply IVTC. Progressive is a different animal.

    See here and consult Google
    http://www.dvdfile.com/news/special_report/production_a_z/3_2_pulldown.htm (see section on "Progressive Scan DVD Players")

    PS: However if we are talking 59.94 fields per second 29.97 frames per second, then traditional IVTC can be used.
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    I've started a new thread for doing this with 720p HDTV broadcasts since the procedures are apparently going to be different.

    Now that I've figured 1080i to 480p out, when I get time I'll write up a guide how to do it (since the vidphiles.com guide is less than intuitive and apparently a bit out of date). I'll give proper credit to all who helped me out in this thread.

    Thanks!
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  21. PS: However if we are talking 59.94 fields per second 29.97 frames per second, then traditional IVTC can be used.

    martin3361 had mentioned 1080i further up. I'm having trouble finding out if there's any traditional telecining done before outputting 1080i. I don't think so, but that's more up your alley than mine.

    In most cases where 720p 59.94 progressive frames is the result, the conversion from 24fps was done by repeating full frames in a 3:2 sequence, NOT by traditional telecine field repeat techniques.

    You got me. I was careless. Of course, if it's all progressive then a full IVTC isn't necessary. It wouldn't hurt anything, but it would slow the encoding. If it's 59.94 fps progressive and you want to return to 23.976 fps, you first cut the number of frames in half, as well as the framerate, and then just decimate. One way using AviSynth would be:

    SelectEven()
    Decimate(5)

    Or if using SmartDecimate:

    B=TDeint(Mode=1)#or any other SmartBobber
    SmartDecimate(24,120,B)
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  22. Member edDV's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by manono
    PS: However if we are talking 59.94 fields per second 29.97 frames per second, then traditional IVTC can be used.

    martin3361 had mentioned 1080i further up. I'm having trouble finding out if there's any traditional telecining done before outputting 1080i. I don't think so, but that's more up your alley than mine.
    1080i is the same field rate as 480i so the same telecine conversion applies. You just have a different raster size 1920x1080 vs. 720x480.
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    Done two CSI IVTC/encode to 480p jobs now. They both look great. Thanks everybody! Once I do a few more (just to make sure no errors can slip in), I'll see about making a guide.

    I would have thought the same technique here would have worked on a 480i digital broadcast (my UPN affiliate only broadcasts 4x3 480i on its digital channel). But after auto-ivtc and encoding to 23.976fps with pulldown enabled, this week's rerun of "She Spies" jitters out the wazzoo. Time to start another topic, I guess...
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  24. The Old One SatStorm's Avatar
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    @Robert Simandl:

    "which is all Greek to me."

    You won't have help from me then!!!
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  25. Question:

    I'm trying to do this through Tmpgenc. Is there a guide to doing it that way? I've already transferred the TS stream to MPG2 and then demuxed it to the mov file. What are the specifics of how I should set things for the highest bitrate possible? Can i use CQ?

    I've done some tests and it seems like the titles at the beginning of the movie have jaggies.
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    Well, after all this time I still haven't found a completely foolproof way to do it, but after editing commercials and converting the .ts to .mpg with VideoRedo, here's what I do in TMPGEnc......

    At the main screen check ES video only. Then click settings. Following settings assume you're encoding something from a film source.

    Video

    MPEG-2, 720x480, 16x9 display, 23.976fps (internally 29.97), 2-pass VBR, VBV buffer size automatic, main profile at main level, NTSC, 3:2 pulldown when playback, YUV 4:2:0, DC component precision 10 bits, motion search highest quality.

    Advanced

    Video source interlaced, field order top field first, source aspect ratio 16:9 display, video arrange method fullscreen. In the filter list double click on Inverse Telecine, click auto-setting and pick 24fps flicker prioritized for setting method and none for deinterlace, click start and go get some dinner. When it's done doing the IVTC, you'll need to go through it manually to make sure there's no interlace lines in the frames TMPGEnc picked. The more thoroughly you check, the less likely any will slip through. If you find interlace in the frames that TMPGEnc selected, go back to a spot before the interlaced frames start, right-click, pick enable auto setting after this frame, pick 24fps flicker prioritized and no deinterlace again, and click OK. When you're satisfied that there are no interlace lines in the frames picked by TMPGEnc, click OK to go back to settings.

    GOP structure

    I-pictures 1, P-pictures 4, B-pictures 2. Output interval of sequence header 1, max frames 18. Output closed GOP and detect scene change both checked. Force picture type setting not checked.

    Back to main screen and click start. Then go to bed for the evening. If you're lucky it might be done when you get up in the morning. TMPGEnc is a great encoder but it's slower than molasses in January. Going uphill. But I don't feel like learning (and spending money on) something different.

    The above USUALLY gets the job done well for me for 1080i film-based shows. I haven't made an official guide because I still get glitches occasionally.

    Hope that helps.
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  27. Член BJ_M's Avatar
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    CSI (now) is actually shot directly to HDTV btw ...
    "Each problem that I solved became a rule which served afterwards to solve other problems." - Rene Descartes (1596-1650)
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  28. Robert,

    Thank you for taking the time to write that. I'm going to try it tonight.
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