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  1. Super info. I have been researching a lot of this stuff and have experimented ad nauseum. Its great to know there is a common interest.

    For all the widgets and tools out there to create DVD's from scratch check out a tool called DVD Author. It's tuned for software developers, but give it a look anyway. It's a whole new way to look at DVD content creation and authoring.
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  2. I am getting the hang of TDA quite nicely. I do have one question if anyone knows the answer. I did a capture using UMF 2 and the file got split in two as it was just over 90 minutes. How do I join the two pieces back together in TDA once I have removed the commercials and so forth?

    So far, the program accepted the two clips, and I have done all the editing. The chapter summary now shows six chapters totalling about 80 minutes, but the program is still telling me that it is too large for a standard disc. The original MPEGs were pulled down at the UMF 90 minute template, so even though the original file was oversized, the edited content should not need to be re-rendered, should it?

    More to the point, I would have liked to rejoin the two clips before I started editing, since the split took place at a critical moment in the content.
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  3. Member ZippyP.'s Avatar
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    If you put each clip into the same track in TDA then they will play one after the other. If the DVD is just a little oversize then you can go ahead and create an oversize DVD on your hard drive and then use DVDShrink to get it to fit.

    Oh, and you would have been better off starting your own thread for your question. It's not polite to threadjack.
    "Art is making something out of nothing and selling it." - Frank Zappa
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  4. Oh, and you would have been better off starting your own thread for your question. It's not polite to threadjack.
    Sorry zippy, but I wasn't aware that I was off topic. This whole thread started with VHS conversion to DVD, so I apologise if I got a bit carried way after finally making some progress following the advice of earlier posters.
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  5. This is what i tested today with my son`s vhs cartoon:

    AVI file captered true my JVC DV cam:




    mpeg2 file after encoded with tmpgenc, and playing with some of the filters.

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  6. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
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    You over-filtered. Common mistake. Pull back a bit there. 20-1-20 would have been fine in TMPG. This image is also full of what appears to be deinterlace jaggies.
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  7. The soure is interlaced, and I haven`t used the de-interlacing filter since this was for my PAL TV.

    This is with 20 -1 - 20 setting.

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  8. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
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    That looks quite decent. I'd not filter any more. Maybe 40-1-40 or 40-2-40 at most. You don't want to overdo it, not at all. You get "plastic" artifacts otherwise.
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    I know it technically is not supposed to matter, but would it make a difference when transferring VHS to DVD if I use a VCR that has S-Video output? The videos are standard VHS, but I was thinking that might make it look a little bit more like the original if I use a VCR with S-Video output. However, I don't want to buy one unless that is true.
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    Don't all VCRs have S-video, now? There is some difference Between each connector: cable<RCA<S-video<component, but not night and day.
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  11. Originally Posted by burdell1
    I know it technically is not supposed to matter, but would it make a difference when transferring VHS to DVD if I use a VCR that has S-Video output? The videos are standard VHS, but I was thinking that might make it look a little bit more like the original if I use a VCR with S-Video output. However, I don't want to buy one unless that is true.
    https://www.videohelp.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=247084&postdays=0&postorder=asc&highlight=vhs&start=0

    I hope that this is helpful.
    Cole
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  12. Once again gshelley and smurf hit the nail on the head, not to mention vhelp. I also use a JVC DRm10, a proc amp, a Vidicraft Detailer, and a TBC. If you add to the mix a high-quality VCR that does digital noise reduction you can not only duplicate the video quality of a VHS source, you can significantly improve on it. Noise reduction takes place all along the chain -- in the VCR if you use a good one, like the JVC W808 or the earlier M784/785 series or the JVC 2911 or earlier 9800 series; and noise reduction also takes place courtesy of the proc amp by cutting down on the sharpness control a little; and the JVC DRm10 itself does some noise reduction courtesy of its LSI chip. When you throw in a Vidicraft Detailer, the net result is a DVD that lacks much of the chroma noise in the original VHS tape but has enhanced fine detail present but not visible in the original VHS master. The best of both worlds.

    Personally, I like the depth and richness of a good VHS-to-DVD conversion. There's something about the rich range of grays and, with a BVP-4 or adjustment to black level in a cap card like the AIW, the dark blacks in a high-quality processed VHs-to-DVD conversion done correctly, that reminds me of analog film...as opposed to the icy digital clarity of a straight DVD capture from digital cable. The slight blurring you get in a high-quality VHS-to-DVD conversion can often improve B&W material IMHO, especially old B&W movies. Digital cable tends to occupy pretty high hands in the cable range and sad to say, these all-digital channels often get oversaturated so that you get some slight visible macroblocking on some digital cable channels. In my area, for example, Turner Classic Movies shows visible moving pixelation and slight gray-level zoning like a poor-quality 16-bit video codec and this is particularly noticeable with old B&W noir films. I much prefer my own VHS-to-DVD conversions of old B&W noir films rather than the JVC DRM10-capped straight-from-digital-cable versions.
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    I have been using the new Sony DVD-Direct stand-alone unit.

    I plug my camcorder or VCR to it and the images have come out superb. It encodes and burns to DVD on the fly. No pixels with capturing problems.
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  14. I have a dazzle converter, I turn one of my tapes to dvd, But I didn't save it to my HD, I tried to make a copy of the same dvd that I made using the pennicle software that it came with, but I keep getting the disc has an error, do anyone know why I am having this problem or should I have saved it to my hard drive and then burn it to dvd from there using another program
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  15. Originally Posted by stillmars321
    I have been using the new Sony DVD-Direct stand-alone unit.

    I plug my camcorder or VCR to it and the images have come out superb. It encodes and burns to DVD on the fly. No pixels with capturing problems.
    That's the VRD-VC10 right? I've also tried it but had tons of A/V sync issues. Though that may have just been from video breaks in the tape...
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  16. I am also trying to capture some VHS tapes to DVD. The problem I'm having is a very noticeable horizonal comb affect caused by the interlaced source, noticeable when there is lots of movement. Other than this show stopping problem, the capture looks pretty good.

    I'm using an ATI Theater pro 550 TV/capture card (the Saphire clone). I've tried several capture programs starting with Nerovision Express but I've also tried AMCap, VirtualVCR and the new version of Virtualdub. The interlace jaggies were present no matter which capture program I used. The tapes are commercial pre-recorded VHS tapes and the VCR is a JVC HR-S9911U. At first I used the s-video output from the VCR to the capture card but then tried it with composite. I had read on techreport.com that the Theater Pro "comb filter can only be used for composite and coaxial video input, not S-Video". After doing a little reading on here it looks like s-video output is the way to go but regardless, the interlace jaggies are present with either output. I'm doing the capture on my spare computer which is actually a little faster than my primary. It's an Athlon XP +3200 being captured to a Maxtor Onetouch USB drive. I shut down everything but the capture and bump the capture program's priority up to "high". Nerovision Express wasn't showing me dropped frames but Virtualdub was reporting an occasional dropped frame although not many. That Maxtor drive is 300 gigs so I was capturing to an uncompressed AVI. I'm capturing at 720x480. Even if I wanted to capture at a lower resolution I can't seem to get any of the capture programs to let me set it lower than 704x480. I think that the card may not support lower resolutions. To create the DVD-ready mpeg I'm using Premier Pro 1.0 which includes the Mainconcept mpeg encoder. I also have the Dolby Digital audio encoder plugin. I do a two-pass vbr encode with an average bitrate of 6000. It takes around 24 hours for 90 minutes of video. The mpeg encoding info is really irrelevant to the problem though, I have it before doing the mpeg encoding and naturally it's still present afterwards. I'm watching the final product on a Toshiba SD-6200 DVD player and a Hitachi 53" rear projection HDTV. The horizonal comb effect is worse on this big HDTV, granted, but only because the TV is showing more detail than a smaller, regular TV.

    Anybody have any advice on how to get rid of the interlace jaggies? Like I said before, if it weren't for this the capture would look pretty decent. The jaggies definitely make the quality of the capture unacceptable though. How can I get rid of it? The pic below is an example of how it looks. This is not one of my VHS captures, it's just some video I grabbed off digital cable when running some test captures. Regardless though, this is exactly how it looks when I do my VHS captures. I am NOT trying to deinterlace my captures at any stage of the process, by the way...

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  17. The mpeg encoding info is really irrelevant to the problem though
    Are you sure? The field order might be wrong.
    Mind you thats a very blurry capture - I assume
    this is a composite sample with the comb filter on?
    Can't tell much with out a moving pic. Have you
    tried running it through dscaler just for fun?
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  18. The mpeg encoding info is really irrelevant to the problem though


    Are you sure? The field order might be wrong.
    At least with Nerovision Express, AMCap and VirtualVCR, I could never find an option for field order. Mainly I just wanted to verify that it was correctly set. Not sure about the newest Virtualdub but I don't recall seeing it there either. I'm at work right now so I can't check until later. But the point is that I have that interlace horizonal comb problem before and after I encode the video so the encoding doesn't seem to have anything to do with it one way or another. I suppose interlace jaggies would be more prominet in the raw AVI capture being viewed on the computer since that is not an interlaced display. Presumably this would not be as noticeable on the TV since it is able to display interlaced video correctly? However, it looks the same both ways, the raw AVI capture on the computer and on the TV after 24 hours of encoding with Mainconcept Media encoder. In Premier Pro, I'm not sure how the field order was set and again, I'm at work so I can't check right now. I worked from a pre-set though and changed a few other things but not the field order. I feel sure that a high end app like Premier Pro would have it correctly set. I think for ntsc it has to be bottom first doesn't it?

    Mind you thats a very blurry capture - I assume
    this is a composite sample with the comb filter on?
    Can't tell much with out a moving pic.
    Well that is a capture from my digital cable. Being "digital" you would think the quality would be good but you would be wrong. It's pretty crappy except for the HDTV channels which look incredible. Really that pic was just an example to show what the interlace jaggies look like in my captures. I can't recall if that was composite or s-video but the jaggie problem looks pretty much the same either way.

    Have you tried running it through dscaler just for fun?
    No, never even heard of it...
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  19. very helpful article above, thanks.... Always wondered why my vhs dubs looked so blotchy, (colour override) (firey faces and yellowish trees, that actually should be green). The only bit rate that works for me is 9000kps at 720x576 through Sony Vegas 4. One hour of video per disc )-: )-: Looks like i'll be waiting for HD-DVD, before I'll transfer my vhs's to dvd!!!!! I'm in australia and I haven't seen them yet on the shelf, are HD-DVD burners popping up in shops up there in the states yet?? I believe these have about 50 GIG of storage per disc. You should then get at least five hours of high quality video per disc.
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  20. Member
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    after a long battle with different capture cards getting the same old result , poor transfers
    I tried these ADS Pyroa/link with a Sima SCC corrector Adobe premier software
    encode MPG and go for the best quality dont worry about the time.
    then usingTMPGenc 3xp this makes dvd into Pal or ntsc.
    menu and set up with DVDlabpro
    if it still to long record to the hard drive
    Now the test burn the first part on top quality 1 rewritable disc.
    then use DVD shrink to a second rewritable and then watch both on the TV .
    IT is hard to pick the difference

    But the best way is to get a sony hi end recorder and the does a much finer job without all the work.

    Now for my good words , I need a bit of help
    after a crash I cant get the sound to record
    its recording in the small windows record program , but not the capture porgrams.
    . line is activated and the sound volume is contrable strange
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  21. Member
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    I bought a HP Movie Maker hp3000 external DVD/CD burner and used HP software and the drive will hook up directly to your VHS player and will do all what you want it to do along with editing. It is a older drive and the newer one is HP4000. It uses the red, white , yellow and s-video cable to hook up to it and a usb to hook up to your computer and the software will do the rest of captureing and burining. Used to to put parts of 5 different VHS tapes togather into one DVD. Hope this works for you. Just an idea.
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  22. Originally Posted by offline
    Very clean gshelley61, and well defined;
    but I can't honestly say I like it, being a
    PAL person. NTSC just can not replicate flesh tones.
    You are used to it - I'm not. :/
    Is the good captain embarrassed, or we are seeing it with NTSC fleshtone artifact ?
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  23. Originally Posted by jah2
    I am also trying to capture some VHS tapes to DVD. The problem I'm having is a very noticeable horizonal comb affect caused by the interlaced source, noticeable when there is lots of movement. Other than this show stopping problem, the capture looks pretty good.
    I got this type of artifact when I connect the VHS thru a MacroVision remover Box.
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  24. Member
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    I'm using this method to convert my Hi8 tapes to DVD
    http://dvdguide.ennik.com

    I think the same method should work fine for VHS
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  25. I did use the settings to Capture VHS to MPEG using ATI AIW 9800 Pro. I used the DVD settings that came with the card but the 2 hours ended up with over 6.7 GB which I couldnt fit on one DVD.

    I read the post here and searched around and played with the Capture settings as follows
    Reduced Resolution to 352x240 and Max Bitrate to 4.0 MB/S but average 3.9 MB/S

    The video quality is good for the first 60% of the video but then it gets slow and frames just jump around the end - remaining 40%

    What is wrong and how can I fix that

    Thanks
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  26. Another note, I noticed that ATI MMC gives me the message that capture settings is not compatible with MMC and the frame jumping occurs. Not sure how to fix that to get smooth capture

    Any help is appreciated
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  27. Member
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    Originally Posted by Jasper-e

    I think the same method should work fine for VHS
    It really works!

    linomics
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  28. Member
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    This thread is almost 2 years old. I'm looking for a tutorial that will help me do just this using all standard/free software. I don't see anything about this on this site except one tutorial but it uses commercial software.

    Are there any other tutorials people have that are nice and easy to follow and pretty universal?
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  29. Member
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    Hi people!

    I have a problem with my K-World DVB-S 100. It's a DVB FTA card with S-video and composite in.

    My system is:
    AMD AthlonXP+ 2800 - 1GB RAM - HDD SATA 250 GB (where I make capture).

    The software used for capturing is the native software with my card.

    The problem is:
    when I'm capturing, the result is out of sync. Especially with VHS source on composite in.
    I know it's a problem with the video signal. I mean: because the source is quitely bad, I think that an unstable signal can produce a bad quality on acquiring.

    I think: there is a method for take numbers of video dropped frames, so I can remove that audio parts without video?

    Have U understand ... ???
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  30. Originally Posted by gilberto
    If you are outputting to DVD, then capture at DVD resolution. Use HuffyUV, like the above poster mentioned. Then use a good MPG encoder, and you should be able to achieve the results you want and still fit about two hours on a DVD using an average of 6000 kps. Depending on the quality of your source material and the quality of your MPG encoder, you can even try half-DVD resolution (352x576) and fit even more per disc without much loss in quality. A lot depends on the software you use. Most consumer-grade encoders aren't that good. And don't capture directly to MPG.
    Test0001
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