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  1. Preservationist davideck's Avatar
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    Here's a good thread for you...
    https://forum.videohelp.com/viewtopic.php?t=287476
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  2. Member
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    thanks for the pointer, hadn't come across that thread yet. of course it only serves to confuse things even further. it starts out with the JVC being superior and shifts toward pro-panny later in the thread . It sounds like I need to just pick one and go with it and if I have an issue, buy a standalone TBC (ouch). I wish I could test the tapes I need to dub someplace before investing the $$$. I could pay someone to do it, but I'm a techie gizmo geek and would rather do it myself.
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  3. this comparison clearly shows what the Datavideo TBC-1000 can do for a squirrely image

    http://www.kozenrufu.com/pre-tbc.wmv
    http://www.kozenrufu.com/post-tbc.wmv
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  4. Preservationist davideck's Avatar
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    DVD Recorders have an internal Frame Synchronizer with some inherent TBC performance. This makes them suitable for use as an external TBC/Frame Synchronizer in passthrough mode. They will output continuous sync regardless of input disturbances, thereby eliminating many audio/video skew issues when capturing from analog tape.

    Frame Synchronization and Timebase Correction are independent functions. Frame Synchronization is performed on the read side of memory to guarantee continuous sync at the video output. Timebase Correction is performed on the write side of memory by deriving a suitable sampling clock with which to digitize the video input. The characteristics of the sampling clock determine the Timebase Correction capability. For more details; https://forum.videohelp.com/viewtopic.php?t=279530

    TBC performance capabilities vary among different manufacturers. Toshiba DVD Recorders provide noticeable improvement of horizontal jitter errors. It was mentioned earlier that the TBC/Frame Synchronizer in the Panasonic ES10 does a fine job of correcting some vertical disturbances.

    DVD Recorders do NOT remove copy protection. In fact, they sometimes falsely identify copy protection on unprotected sources and refuse to record. In passthrough mode, they will insert the MV protection if they detect it in the input source (falsely or otherwise). If this is an issue, then an "image stabilizing" device or an actual external TBC (DataVideo or AVT-8710) may be required.
    Life is better when you focus on the signals instead of the noise.
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  5. Originally Posted by robroth
    an old post i realize but lots of valuable info here. one question i'm trying to determine is which is a better machine, a jvc 9800 or the panny 1980. in this thread the panny is described as having a full field TBC, the jvc is described as having the "4MB TBC/DNR processor". I don't know if that's also full field or frame or if the TBC is any better in one than in the other.
    Buy both although buying used machines may be unfair for both since one may had more wear then the other. For exampled my SVO-2000 produces same image quality as my 2nd hand vcr that is probably 40$ or so. The SVO showed a bit more details but if you don't look close enought you'll think is the same VCR and I used s-video for the SVO and composite on the other... without APC the image on the SVO looks worse then the other that uses "perfect tape" and 19u. I'm all disappointed at all VCRs... the main reason I can't technically complain is that I bought them all used... so I still can't confirm which is better in anything except that AG with TBC fixes the distortions my SLV or SVO may show but image quality appears to be better on the SVL... I'm all mad after emptying my pockets and virtually gain no advantaged worth for all the money that I spent then what I would gain if I just used the VCRs we had at home really. I'll still need to confirm one thing... buying a DATAVIDEO1000 with my SVL may finally give me unexpected results... but is another hit and miss try worth 300$ the AG with TBC I got seems to have much head wear and little white dots appear.
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  6. Banned
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    Oct 2004
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    Originally Posted by yoda313
    Hello,

    Originally Posted by lordsmurf
    Expect to pay $200-300
    Oh ok...

    Not quite the price range I had in mind. For that money I'd rather buy a good svhs vcr.
    I guess I'm happy with my current setup.

    Thanks again

    Kevin
    I just saw this (Yes, I know, it's an old post). Gosh, could it be true? Would a budget under-$200 svhs vcr be a "good" vcr ? And could it be true that this cheapo svhs would do more for my VHS captures than a good TBC? Is it possible ? ? ? ?

    Naaahh!
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  7. Originally Posted by sanlyn
    Originally Posted by yoda313
    Hello,

    Originally Posted by lordsmurf
    Expect to pay $200-300
    Oh ok...

    Not quite the price range I had in mind. For that money I'd rather buy a good svhs vcr.
    I guess I'm happy with my current setup.

    Thanks again

    Kevin
    I just saw this (Yes, I know, it's an old post). Gosh, could it be true? Would a budget under-$200 svhs vcr be a "good" vcr ? And could it be true that this cheapo svhs would do more for my VHS captures than a good TBC? Is it possible ? ? ? ?

    Naaahh!
    Absolutely you can get a great SVHS vcr for $200, what I paid for my JVC S7600 which is a fine piece of equipment. And you really do want both, a good SVHS and a separate TBC if you want to do it right. Of course, the vcr would be used and you'd have to buy carefully on ebay (ask if they refund). And see smurf's Digitalfaq website for good vcrs.
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  8. Does somebody have experiences with Keywest BVTBC10 ?
    http://www.keywesttechnology.com/voodoo/bvtbc10-58.html

    In the 10 bit signal (color?) processing worth feature?
    Are there other TBC's with 10 bit signal processing available?
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  9. Member GreyDeath's Avatar
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    Ricky D,

    The ES-10 you can use as a pass-through. It can do some amazing things to some old tapes. I then pass it through the TBC-1000 to get a clean signal to the ADVC-100 just in case any weirdness gets through that would make my comp drop frames.

    I also use the JVC S9911U, but no longer use the built-in TBC when using the Pany as a pass-through, they don't work well together and can make the picture worse.
    "*sigh* Warned you, we tried. Listen, you did not. Now SCREWED, we all will be!" ~Yoda
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  10. Member
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    I have a CBT-100 TBC (Which I'm led to believe is the same as an AVT-8710) and a JVC HR-S5100U S-VHS deck. I find that on some tapes (mostly 1st gen or greater) that the 'hockey stick' effect becomes an issue. If I don't use the TBC unit, then the tape jitter is quite evident, but no 'hockey stick' effect along the top of the frame. (tearing, whatever you want to call the anomaly. *smile*)

    I am using a Panasonic DMR-ES20 SA DVDR with the Video Line NR turned on. It does help clean some of the VHS noise & grain, but is it compounding the 'hockey stick' problem?

    Can anyone tell me what exactly the Panasonic Line NR on the DMR-ES20 is and what exactly it does? I've researched it, but Panasonic don't really tell you much. They are using the typical 'gee whiz' marketing terminology to describe it.

    I would really appreciate your help.



    Anther strange thing that seems to happen sometimes when transferring 1st gen (or greater) tapes is that the footage will look as though it get's 'blurry' or out of focus while the TBC is being used. The TBC is helping to straighten the picture up, but it will induce this 'blurry effect'. I've been able to minimize the effect and stabilize the picture quality by manually adjusting the tracking, but then the audio goes 'out the window'. At which time I usually have to record the audio sperately and then fuss with trying to hack n' splice and synch everything on my Video Workstation PC. Can any of you experienced folks tell me why the 'out of focus/blurry' deal happens?
    Pronounced 'Sniv-el', Not 'Sniv-i-lee'
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  11. Member
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    Hi All,

    I have been digitizing VHS/S-VHS and Beta footage for awhile and have been using a Panasonic S-VHS AG-7530 deck for most of my work. It is the best i've been able to find so far, used. I would like to get a TBC and some other equipment. I have read that a professional TBC will not offer the same features as a prosumer one for restoration such as the Datavideo and BVT models. In restoration of video is a professional TBC or a prosumer tbc be more beneficial or would both be the same?

    Thanks
    M
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  12. @mark23 I would not advise you to buy a pro/broadcast TBC. They certainly do not lack in features, in fact they come with more than you would need. They are also costly, and may have a steep learning curve to even use. Not at all like the plug 'n play, affordable consumer models like Datavideo TBC-1000, and AVT-8710 (and rebadges eg. CTB-100). There are many others but those models in particular are the most commonly suggested.

    Out of those two, I can only recommend the Datavideo, as the AVT units have had problems for a while now and I'm not sure they've been resolved yet. It's a shame because for years they were highly regarded. But the Datavideo TBC continues to provide reliable performance, and although some units are not as transparent to the signal, they work as intended. Out of the many options, I'd say TBC-1000 is your best bet.

    There are also other devices that can provide TBC performance/frame-sync, such as particular DVD recorder and camcorder models. I personally haven't used them so I can't comment on their effectiveness. Just be aware, in case you're not already, that an external TBC is not used for improving PQ. It's used to create a stable signal from your unstable tapes, to aid you in the capture process. That mostly means preventing dropped frames, and defeating anti-copy. Don't expect much more than that.
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