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  1. I have been using sharpies with no problems. Then I started thinking about how I store my archives, re-using the spindle cases that the blank media comes in. It's a convenient storage container, but I realize the with the DVDs stacked on top of one another, each DVDs writing surface will be laying on the top of (dry) sharpie ink.

    Does anyone foresee a problem with the ink or solvents used in the ink being in contact with another DVDs writing surface and stored for long periods of time?
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  2. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by DoubleACL
    I have been using sharpies with no problems. Then I started thinking about how I store my archives, re-using the spindle cases that the blank media comes in. It's a convenient storage container, but I realize the with the DVDs stacked on top of one another, each DVDs writing surface will be laying on the top of (dry) sharpie ink.

    Does anyone foresee a problem with the ink or solvents used in the ink being in contact with another DVDs writing surface and stored for long periods of time?
    No. It will not. Discs are thicker in the middle, at least ones with HUB rings. The discs do not touch.
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  3. I know a lot of people use Sharpie's and I have as well however be aware. Standard Sharpie's are alcohol based pens. If you read the manufacturers label it probably states not to use alcohol on the disk. I use Fuji DVD disks and it clearly states to use oil based pens only. Sharpie does make oil based pens called Sharpie Paint Markers.
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  4. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
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    It doesn't matter. DVDs have a plastic upper layer. You could soak it in orange juice and it wouldn't eat through it.

    You're thinking of CDs, where the writing went directly on the foil top.
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  5. I'm mearly stating facts provided bt the vendor nothing more. These facts are stated on the DVD label not a CD.
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  6. How do you label your DVDs?
    If they are printable, I use my R200. I might even spray it with clear if I think it's going to be used a lot.

    If they are not printable, I use any permanent marker I can find in my cluttered desk drawer
    tgpo famous MAC commercial, You be the judge?
    Originally Posted by jagabo
    I use the FixEverythingThat'sWrongWithThisVideo() filter. Works perfectly every time.
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  7. Sharpie pens are not a true 100% alcohol-based. They use an additional chemical solvent which allows the ink to dry and stabilize. That being said, although they may smell horrible, they are not etching themselves into the plastic on a quest to ruin your data. There are some archivists that will not use them because of "theoretical" damage that could be caused over the long term, although it seems to be posed in terms of 'if George Washington burned his memoirs into Ye Olde Memorex brand media on his hand crank burner, it might not be readable today!'

    Somehow, I don't think your great-grandkids will have their lives devastated if you can't successfully hand down your ripped Adam Sandler Box Set.

    Sharpie pens are available in every color you can think of and are the least expensive, particularly in club packs you can find in warehouse clubs. Interestingly, although they all claim to be "fine point," I have found wide variations in the width of the markings. I prefer a finer point as it allows for better writing control and a neater look, particularly when writing out long titles.

    True alcohol-based pens are my next favorite. Fellowes has a very long lasting 4-pack of different colors, of which their blue is my favorite. These just don't seem to ever dry up (although you have about one minute of continuous use before you must recap them for a few minutes for the ink to recharge). The only downside is the tip wears flat with prolonged use, making tight writing more difficult. These also clean up easily with alcohol if you need to correct a mistake.

    Water-based pens are available as well from Memorex, TDK, Maxell, etc. They are typically designated as CD pens. Some have the finest point tips out there -- too fine in some cases. Unfortunately, I like these the least as they dry up very rapidly, even with the cap on. I've never had one last more than 3-4 months, where my other pens are more than a year old and still going. They are also difficult to use on shiny-top media, as they are prone to uneven application, smearing, and can smudge very easily.

    Label adhesive's long term stability is the primary reason they are discouraged. In dark humid conditions, higher heat and humidity, or any contact with moisture will cause the adhesive to break down. Those with very old cassettes or other labeled products might see this already as the label starts to peel away. As you remove it, long strands of deteriorating adhesive can be seen, and in some cases, it literally eats into the paper layer (looking like a semi-transparent clear oil mark or spots).

    Since few of us truly have perfect storage environments, it seems unwise to use labels (hub labels are far safer). The contents of the disc are more important than how it looks.
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