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  1. Member DJRumpy's Avatar
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    hhhhbk, I'll ask that you do the same. This guide thread is not a forum to discuss the merits of manual vs auto methods. It is a guide. Posts in this thread should be specific to the guide iteself, with questions or problems related to the guide.

    Please post your information elsewhere in the forum, or create your own guide regarding it's use.
    Impossible to see the future is. The Dark Side clouds everything...
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  2. LEVEL will be set to AS @ L5 since we configured it that way on the main properties page, and the ASPECT RATIO tab should be set to 'Pixel Aspect Ratio' (Square)
    Click OK
    Yet DJRumpy said that it should be encoded to 4:3? Is this what your meant DJR?
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  3. Member DJRumpy's Avatar
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    No, these two settings are different. The Level setting has no relation to the 4:3 aspect ratio. It is more specific to maximum resolutions and bitrates.
    Impossible to see the future is. The Dark Side clouds everything...
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  4. Thanks for the great guide
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  5. Got any suggestions for audio/video sync issues? One DVD worked perfectly (used AC3 audio). I repeated the process a second time and the audio is off by over 1 second.
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  6. Member DJRumpy's Avatar
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    Did you do anything differently on the second disk? Also, was the disc store bought, or a dvdr?
    Impossible to see the future is. The Dark Side clouds everything...
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  7. As far as I know, nothing changed. It's a store bought disc.

    Can this sync problem be because I selected "forced film" which forced the framerate to 23.976 fps when it should have been an NTSC which is 29.970 fps?
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  8. Member DJRumpy's Avatar
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    Not likly. Although it can cause choppy video, it wouldn't usually cause audio sync issues. Did DVD2AVI report an offset when it created your AC3 audio? (-xx ms in the AC3 filename).
    Impossible to see the future is. The Dark Side clouds everything...
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  9. null post
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  10. Member DJRumpy's Avatar
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    The reported 29.97 is normal, and the standard for dvd video. If it reported Film 99%, then you did that part properly by using force film. What about the audio? (see my ? above).
    Impossible to see the future is. The Dark Side clouds everything...
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  11. Framerate: 29.970
    Video type: FILM 99%

    Also, when I load one of the main movie VOBs in gspot, it reports 29.970 fps.

    So why would I make it forced film if it's clearly 29.970 fps? FILM is 23.970 fps. Is this an error in the guide?
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  12. To answer your question: yes, -66 ms. Seems like it always reports an offset with anything (DVD or MPEG-2 from my PVR). Do I need to account for this somewhere in VDM if I simply add the ac3 stream to my avi once it's encoded?
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  13. Member DJRumpy's Avatar
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    Yes. You AC3 Delay Corrector to fix the offset. Although 66 ms wouldn't account for the second delay, it would cause a slight offset.
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  14. ok... what about my other question regarding the framerate? If it's 29.97 native format, why would I force it to film which is 23.976?
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  15. Member DJRumpy's Avatar
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    Because, the mpeg's true framerate is 23.976. The mpeg is encoded with pulldown flags. Everytime an mpeg player hit's one of these pulldown flags, it tells the player to repeat a frame. It basically converts it from 23.976 to 29.97 fps on the fly during playback, but it's true 'internal' framerate is still 23.976. That is why DVD2AVI is reporting FILM, instead of NTSC.
    Impossible to see the future is. The Dark Side clouds everything...
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  16. Cool... thanks for the information and the time you invested in your guide. It's very cool. I might try to make a guide based on this one you wrote if you don't mind.. I've been meaning to replace my aged DVDx guide on my own page. Once I master this process that is!
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  17. Member DJRumpy's Avatar
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    Not at all. The more guides, the better.

    Let me know how your audio turns out. It should be a simple matter to correct the delay, and remux the ac3 with your XviD file.
    Impossible to see the future is. The Dark Side clouds everything...
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  18. After following the guide as I did before, I get the same 1-2 sec of sync problem with the audio/video streams. ...is there a setting in DVD2AVI that could cause this to happen?

    The DVD source is in sync. Here's the procedure I followed:

    1. Ripped the DVD
    2. Created the dv2 file
    3. Created the script (just cropped and resized)
    4. Encoded to XviD
    5. Used Ac3 Delay Corrector
    6. Muxed the AC3 witht he video in VDM.

    Ideas anyone?
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  19. Member DJRumpy's Avatar
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    None here, unless your source mpeg has some mastering errors. Not unheard of, but rare. Since the only thing that has changed is your source, I would have to suspect that first.
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  20. It's that damn movie, "Twisted." I've tried this twice now and twice I have the same result... it has to be something I'm doing wrong.
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  21. Member DJRumpy's Avatar
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    Not necessarily. Store bought dvd's can be flawed too. The problem shows up when you split (demux) the audio from the video. That's when sync is lost. Is it a general drift, or an abrupt change somewhere?
    Impossible to see the future is. The Dark Side clouds everything...
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  22. Seems to be off by a constant value... too bad there's not some sync tool out there...
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  23. Member DJRumpy's Avatar
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    If it is a constant value, and you have a stretching tool, you can break the audio up into it's 5 component waves (ac3 5.1 righ?), stretch each one so it's duration is exactly the same as the video, and then mux them back together into an AC3 audio file, but it's a lot of work.

    Many of the higher end audio editors will let you timestretch your audio this way. Post in the advanced forum if you want to find a few. Personally, I'd see about getting another copy of the video.
    Impossible to see the future is. The Dark Side clouds everything...
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  24. I don't think it's the video... I just did another DVD and got the same result. I think it's something I'm doing wrong. Look at this:

    Encoded avi file length: 2:18:42
    AC3 stream length: 2:18:15

    What's going on here?
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  25. I think the problem is DVD2AVI for sure now... I cut out a little bit at the beginning of the movie this time and re-did the project.

    I made my crop and resize script and played it in mplayerc:

    Playtime: 2:17:59
    AC3 stream length: 2:17:39

    What the **** am I doing wrong?
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    I used AGK and got 32 seconds out of sync. I think it was the FBI stuff, which has no sound, that comes between the Company intro, which has sound, and the begining of the file. I was able to Vdub, audio interleving and add 32 seconds and fixed it. I think this must be it because when I encoded a single vob after the first, it was in sync. I think AGK uses a very similair method as this guide. I am assuming that your out of sync by a set amount and it isn not progressive.
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  27. Now that you mention it, it could be related to each VOB. This time, I edited out the BS in the beginning and end. Now the AC3 and the d2v are the same run time. (This is getting me pissed) -- encoding to XviD now. I'll let everyone know when it's finished in about 4 hours.
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  28. I have never had good sync luck cropping in DVD2AVI, especially cropping the beggining.


    EDIT - sorry i see AC3 Delay corrector is posted above not reading very good today.
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  29. Member DJRumpy's Avatar
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    You shouldn't need to crop or trim you input. You shouldn't be opening anything but the main movie VOBs in DVD2AVI. The main movie vobs will almost always contain only the movie itself, possibly a quick movie studio logo at the beginning, and credits at the end.

    If you drop extra/unecessary vob's into DVD2AVI, and they contain no audio, you could experience this problem. I've never run across it before, because I've never tried to keep the FBI warning

    I am confused though. You said this was a gradual loss of sync. The issue you describe should have been immediately obvious, even from the beginning of the movie.
    Impossible to see the future is. The Dark Side clouds everything...
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  30. I never said it was a gradual loss, did I? The FBI warning has appeared at the end of 3 movies now in the main VOBs. 55% of pass 2 complete now.
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