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  1. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
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    Jun 2003
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    I've got a 0-255 source file. Without using CCE or AVISYNTH, I need to convert this to a 16-235 output MPEG file.

    The source is an MPEG file that was encoded improperly (0-255).

    I played with TMPGENC, but the "Output YUV data as Basic YCrCb not CCIR601" was no help. It re-increased the 0-255 values, thus putting me twice as far from my goal (test encode was used, my source is still fine). Like I've said many times, that settings alters a 8/16-235 range to 0-255, which is bad for encoding for DVD.

    What can be used to recompress the luma range back down to the proper 16-235 specs. This is something I've forgotten how to do. Should have written it down from last time.

    Any ideas.
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  2. Member FulciLives's Avatar
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    I know you said no AviSynth but I know you use TMPGEnc and AviSynth does work with TMPGEnc

    There is an AviSynth command as such:

    ColorYUV("PC->TV")

    This is to convert 0-255 to 16-235

    Also maybe the VirtualDubMod filter called LEVELS can do this. You can set the input to 0-255 and the output to 16-235 etc.

    I have no experience though using the VirtualDubMod filter.

    - John "FulciLives" Coleman
    "The eyes are the first thing that you have to destroy ... because they have seen too many bad things" - Lucio Fulci
    EXPLORE THE FILMS OF LUCIO FULCI - THE MAESTRO OF GORE
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  3. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
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    Well, I converted the MPEG1 to MPEG2 in TMPGENC (all other settings left alone), and then ran the MPEG through DVD2AVI, changing the colorspace. Saved a D2V, opened in TMPGENC, and then re-encoded new file to MPEG1.

    Burning my test right now.

    No, re-encoding won't hurt the file. There's not much left to hurt. This is one of those extreme restorations, compounded by stupid encoding by another person.

    UPDATE: The test came out fine. That'll do it for me. Probably not ideal for perfect source, but for what I've got to work with, nothing to worry about.
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