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  1. Member
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    I was wondering if someone could clarify the difference between a TBC (that you would find on the Panasonic) and a Virtual TBC (that you would find on the Philips)?

    Andy.
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  2. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
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    No such thing as "virtual" TBC. A TBC is hardware circuits.
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  3. http://www.p4c.philips.com/files/d/dvdr75_17/dvdr75_17_pss_aen.pdf

    Virtual Time Base Corrector: For better-than-original copies of old video tapes
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    "http://www.p4c.philips.com/files/d/dvdr75_17/dvdr75_17_pss_aen.pdf"




    Hmmm...appears to be a hardware device built into a DVD recorder rather than something that is software only, say for PC use.
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  5. It sounds like a marketing ploy to make you think you're getting something you aren't. A true TBC strips off the timing info from the video and replaces it with clean, precise timing. The typical TBC circuit that some VCRs and standalone recorders have is usually a "line" TBC. It stores horizontal lines and replaces the timing at that level, but not the vertical timing. This counteracts some of the effects of helical head tape stretch when capping from VHS. A good thing to have A "full-frame TBC" stores the entire frame at a time in buffer memory and replaces the horizontal AND the vertical timing information. It's usually a standalone component. It counteracts effects caused by tape stretch and mechanical slop in the VCR mechanism. A better thing to have

    A quick way to check to see if you need a TBC, aside from lip-sync problems in your captures, is to look very carefully at vertical lines in the source material. If they are sharp, straight and clean, you have a decent source. If they have a distortion similar to "pixelation" in the digital world (small steps), you have tape stretch and you should be using a TBC. This isn't a very scientific test, but it's handy.

    Either ya got a TBC or ya don't. Seeing the word "virtual" always makes me nervous because I associate it with trickery and selling tactics. Like getting a "virtual" raise at work. "Gee, thanks boss" :P Or a salesman telling you the car is "virtually" new. It's not new.

    "Virtual TBC" sounds to me like it's some sort of filtering arrangement, probably proprietary, probably to clean up the video, and it probably does improve it. There are many different filtering approaches when it comes to video, especially when the source is a tape. Every company has its own idea of the perfect filter, and it's really a personal thing what works best for each person's individual taste. Since TBCs are fairly expensive, it's certainly not a true TBC circuit, otherwise they would proudly advertise the fact that it has a "TBC", not a "virtual TBC".

    BTW: Check rjack's post dated 2/17:
    https://www.videohelp.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=202564
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  6. Withdrawn
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  7. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
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    I wonder if they'd accept virtual money to buy one.
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