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  1. I have one VHS tape that when played back I get this noise. The noise is like someone recorded it and didn't have the audio plugs all the way in. Can this be corrected?
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  2. Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
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    Washington, D.C.
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    tommyoz,
    If you do not want to convert your VHS tapes, then you will need some type of in-line filter. That is presuming you have exercised all the noise reductions your equipment already offers as well as quality cabling. It has been my sad experience that these filters do not work as well as I would like. Or at least I am not willing to spend hundreds on a professional piece of equipment to salvage a $10 VHS tape.
    I think you can likely can get rid of most of the noise but you will need to convert your VHS tape to MPG and even then it will not be "completely" pristine. Most all audio software editors will allow you to filter out pops, hisses or scratches to a level as to be inaudible. Some will let you set new volume levels even normalize the entire audio stream. I personally do not like this approach but.....
    You will need to extract your audio from the capture and feed that into your favorite audio tool. My favorite automatically (via a check box) does hiss, noise and pop reductions. All I have to do is create the wav file and about 10 minutes laters, I have a new wav file. I can then remux this with the video and most always it is about a 95% improvement. Enough to be watchable and enjoyable.
    If you are experiencing other types of noise artifacts beyond the normals pops, clicks, hiss or scratches (like a dirty record player, for those old enough to remember those things) maybe a description would help.

    Ed
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  3. Ed, Thanks for the reply.
    I noticed this noise when I was in the process of transferring it over to DVD. The noise is like I described. Sort of like a feedback noise.
    I am aware of of removing pops and hisses but I wasn't sure about this type of noise. I use Sonic Foundry (now Sony) Sound Forge for all my audio needs and I do have all the plugins. I'll give it a try. I just wanted to know if it was possible so I don't waste my time.

    Thanks,
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  4. Member
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    I don't know this helps,but go to your sound mixer and turn down your
    volume a little.
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  5. If the audio sounds cooked, you can try an attenuator in-line between your equipment and your soundcard. It solved my problem. The audio coming from my VCR was often too hot for my soundcard's preamp. The attenuator solved it. You can get one at www.soundprofessionals.com. It costs $7. Radio Shaft also has an attenuator similar for $5, but it is called something like headphone volume adjust thingy. It basically accepts a 1/8" stereo audio input and outputs to 1/8" stereo connector. There is a volume thumb wheel adjuster (attenuator) on the box. It's about an inch big.

    You might also try feeding the audio from your VCR to your stereo first, then output to your sound card.

    Something else that worked for me was to feed the audio into my DAT recorder and then output to the audio card. I had to press record on the DAT recorder (with no tape in) and adjust the recording level. Then the sound going to the sound card was not too hot. The DAT deck's preamp could handle the hot signal.


    Darryl
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  6. Member
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    tommyoz,
    Feedback noise and not completely inserted cables makes one think of ground loop issues. Then the issue is not that the noise is on the original tapes but rather an issue of noise inserted while capturing, which is wholly correctable. Not after capture but before capture. Of course I would try attaching a grounding wire from the VCR to the PC as well as insuring that the cables are fully plugged in.
    And as the others have suggested check your recording volume levels, etc. all good ideas. I have in the past fed the audio signal into my audio capture software and made some volume and recording adjustments before I made the initial video capture made editing the audio for the final product not needed at all.
    I think maybe all you have lost is the time it took to make the noisy recording. A few well placed corrections and I think you will have a great reproduction.

    Ed
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  7. Originally Posted by edsmith77
    tommyoz,
    Feedback noise and not completely inserted cables makes one think of ground loop issues. Then the issue is not that the noise is on the original tapes but rather an issue of noise inserted while capturing, which is wholly correctable. Not after capture but before capture. Of course I would try attaching a grounding wire from the VCR to the PC as well as insuring that the cables are fully plugged in.
    And as the others have suggested check your recording volume levels, etc. all good ideas. I have in the past fed the audio signal into my audio capture software and made some volume and recording adjustments before I made the initial video capture made editing the audio for the final product not needed at all.
    I think maybe all you have lost is the time it took to make the noisy recording. A few well placed corrections and I think you will have a great reproduction.

    Ed
    Ed, thanks for you response and all the others as well. I think I may have steered you guys wrong.

    I meant to say that it was only 1 tape that this happened to. All the rest are ok. The noise on this tape happens also when no other gear is hooked up. So I think the first response I got already answered my question. I edited my first post so as not to confuse anyone else.
    Sorry about that guys.
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  8. There is a good example using Adobe Audition on http://www.wrigleyvideo.com/videotutorial/tut_audition.htm

    This removes the noise of a fan. You can also just decrease the volume on some levels.
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