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  1. I'm in the market to purchase a new camcorder. I have a new Dell desktop with a 4x DVD+R/RW CD-RW Combo Drive. It is my understanding that if I purchase a Mini DV format recorder that I can play the tape into the computer and record it real-time, then transfer the file to DVD. If I purchase the DVD model (probably the Sony DVD-200) I can just transfer the file over...drag-n-drop...and the burn it to DVD. The time difference should be quite noticeable and shouldn't the file transfer be more reliable than play/record off tape? Any tips/tricks and other resources would be appreciated. My goal is to be able to archive all of my recordings to DVD with the most reliable and error-free method available. The Sony writes to DVD-R/RW...will I have problems getting my drive to read the DVD even if I finalize it into a universal format on the camera? Any advice on software titles to purchase would also help. Thanks in advance.
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  2. Human j1d10t's Avatar
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    DV is Digital Video, so the video is in the digital format, just not DVD MPEG2. You can transfer the digital video/audio from a miniDV tape via firewire, and then encode to DVD MPEG2, then author as DVD.

    If you're going for easiest, then probably the DVD camcorder is more your style. But by using miniDV and encoding it to DVD MPEG2 yourself, you can choose the quality of the video, and by that how much you want per DVD.

    It's similar to set-top DVD recorders Vs. burning DVDs on your computer - it depends on how much you want to get in to it.

    As to whether or not your drive will read it, if it's finalized, it's like finalizing a CD, and making it readable on most CD-ROM drives. But if you do have to finalize it, then you'll be going through a bunch of DVDRs. Whereas you can reuse miniDV tapes.
    "Don't try to be a great man. Just be a man, and let history make its own judgment."
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  3. Can you still finalize a DVD/RW to be read and then reuse that disc?

    Thanks for your response!
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  4. Member vhelp's Avatar
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    .
    .
    Can you still finalize a DVD/RW to be read and then reuse that disc?
    I don't see why not. If you are talking about R/W disks, then the answer,
    yes.. you can re-use them again, provided that you re-format them again.
    .
    .
    all R/W format/medium's are rewriteable, meaning you treat them just like
    your oldies, 3 1/4" diskettes.

    -vhelp 2095
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  5. Human j1d10t's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by DVD200
    Can you still finalize a DVD/RW to be read and then reuse that disc?

    Thanks for your response!
    A DVDRW, yes - with a DVD you have to finalize. In fact you can't do track at once with DVD, like on a CDRW.

    Edit: I'm sorry - I missed that you said in your first post the DVD camcorder would take DVDRWs...
    "Don't try to be a great man. Just be a man, and let history make its own judgment."
    Zefram Cochrane
    2073
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  6. Quick question about DV video. If for instance I record 1/2 hour of DV video at it's best resolution and then transfer to a PC, how big would the file size be?
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  7. Member holistic's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by donkey_puncher
    Quick question about DV video. If for instance I record 1/2 hour of DV video at it's best resolution and then transfer to a PC, how big would the file size be?
    DV=~13Gb for every hour (~3.7Mb/sec)
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  8. One more question about DV cameras. While doing a little research I noticed that most DV cameras advertise they can record 540 lines of resolution. If this is the case and you encode to mpeg2 740x480 then won't the video look bad since it's been "blown up"?
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  9. Member ZippyP.'s Avatar
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    Most people use 352x480 resolution, known as 1/2 D1, for home video transferred to DVD.
    "Art is making something out of nothing and selling it." - Frank Zappa
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    I would suggest this:
    miniDV camcorder best you can afford (unfortunately that means it's gotta be Sony, most DV cams have low light performance issues that Sony handles the best, but opinions may be devided)
    firewire card (OHCI) any brand with TI chpset or equivalent is a good idea (30-40 bucks)
    encode to 720x480 MPEG2 (not less) and burn with the same resolution.

    Smaller picture size (half D1) in the age of big sceens is not a good idea.
    I would encode even higher if it was possible (from a good source like DV). Pro Betacam picture is 10-15% better the miniDV and is used throughout for moviemaking and commercial DVD's. So why cripple your own, often irreplaceble footage with half D1 resolution. If 5 yours from now you want to watch it on 60 inch screen it would look just like VHS. Give it best it deserves cause this moment you captured is not gonna happen again, and this is YOUR life not the DVD that you can replace in WalMart for 15$. Once quality is gone, is gone forever.
    Smaller pixel size is ALWAYS better. MiniDV was developed for just that. To give you the tool close to Pro quality. So use it wisely.

    PS. more resolution lines on miniDV means simply better quality material (with more detail) to work with. 520/530 lines will be translated!, not thrown away as you may think, into 480. To allow for best possible amateur picture today. Take FULL advantage of it.
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  11. Maybe I need sleep, but I didn't see anyone mention the BIG one: editing on DV is flexible, easy, and with little to no quality loss, and damn near impossible (and usually very lossy) on MPEG! If you intend to edit, add effects, titles, compositing, etc., DO NOT get an MPEG cam. Period.
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