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  1. Member
    Join Date: May 2006
    Location: United States Of America
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    Yeah,
    I hate to admit it, though (despite my interest/tinkering over the years) I still have no clue what certain things mean. I know that 4:3 vs 16:9 is full vs widescreen but why is it that when even a professional movie studio releases a film fullscreen in 1080, it still needs to be pillarboxed? If they rescan the print, shouldn't they then be able to display it widescreen?!
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  2. Member
    Join Date: Jun 2012
    Location: USA
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    The programs are being presented as originally intended.

    Pre-1954 there was no such thing as widescreen movies (with a very few exceptions.) Until the late 1990's all television was 4:3. To display it any other way would crop off part of the picture.
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  3. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2001
    Location: Deep in the Heart of Texas
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    IIWY, I'd stop using the term "fullscreen". A "widescreen" (aka 16:9) title plays FULL SCREEN on a 16:9 TV (which most are these days). A "fullscreen" (aka 4:3) image never plays as a FULL SCREEN on a 16:9 unless some doofus has set the display to stretch things out. Would make more sense to call it "narrow screen" or "square-ish screen".

    Or better yet, call it 4:3 and 16:9. Then everyone knows what you're talking about.

    As smrpix mentioned, a 4:3 image cannot be displayed correctly AND fully on a 16:9 display (and vice-versa). It can either be displayed fully and incorrectly (stretching, and/or cropping) or correctly but not fully (letter/pillar-boxing).

    Scott
    "When will the rhetorical questions end?!" - George Carlin
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  4. Member
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    Okay, but this had a wide theatrical release in '89. Why are the DVDs and even the iTunes version still in 1080 4:3? Yes, it's pillarboxed so it doesn't distort, but if rescanning why not just use the proper... eh, I don't think I even know what I'm trying to say or how to make it understood :/
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  5. I'm a Super Moderator johns0's Avatar
    Join Date: Jun 2002
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    Some movies were shot in 4:3 and others in 16x9,end of story.
    I think,therefore i am a hamster.
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  6. Member netmask56's Avatar
    Join Date: Sep 2005
    Location: Sydney, Australia
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    Not sure but maybe do you mean the few theatrical wide screen typical widescreen 2.35 films that have been released as a cut down 4:3 version, sometimes seen on TV. But this would be a long long time ago. Sometimes a blockbuster is released on DVD that was shot as 2.35 is cropped to fill the 16:9 home TV frame rather than have black bars top and bottom, terrible practice but it does happen.
    TheVoiceIsAnotherPerson ~ BeyonWiz DP-P1 and T3 PVR's ~ Popcorn C200 ~ Samsung ES8000 65" LED TV ~ Windows 7 ~ Yamaha RX-A1030 http://www.openwiz.org/wiki/ProjectX
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  7. Originally Posted by takearushfan View Post
    eh, I don't think I even know what I'm trying to say or how to make it understood :/
    Can you post a screenshot of the video in question?
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  8. Member
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    The IMDB reports it as "Aspect Ratio 1.85 : 1 "
    You know how VLC lets you choose between fitting in the window or keeping the original resolution? The first shot is of the original resolution, the second if I make it fit the app's window.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	vlcsnap-2014-08-27-05h14m28s85_NOFIT.png
Views:	10
Size:	1.29 MB
ID:	27103
    Click image for larger version

Name:	vlcsnap-2014-08-27-05h14m28s85_FIT.png
Views:	10
Size:	1.49 MB
ID:	27104
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  9. Member
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    Yeah, that didn't work. This is what it actually looks like in VLC before fitting, which appears to be a zoom...?
    Click image for larger version

Name:	Untitled-1.png
Views:	12
Size:	1.75 MB
ID:	27105
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  10. Prior to the advent of HDTV virtually nothing was shot at 16:9. Common theatrical widescreen movie formats were wider than 16:9. The closest being 1.85:1, many at ~2:35:1. Since DVD and Blu-ray only support 4:3 and 16:9 DAR, any movie that doesn't have one of those aspect ratios will be cropped, pillarboxed or letterboxed.

    Less popular movies are often mastered from old 4:3 studio video tapes. Hence they are pan-and-scanned to 4:3.

    If you're downloading torrents -- who knows what was done to them.
    Last edited by jagabo; 27th Aug 2014 at 06:19.
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  11. Member
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    *shrug* That's how it's presented from iTunes.
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  12. I don't know exactly what you're showing in those screen caps. In the last one, the image is very close to 16:9 after removing the black borders.

    Do you realize that when viewing video in a full screen WINDOW on a 16:9 display, after leaving room for the Start bar, the window's borders, the title bar, the menu bar, and VLC's transport controls you don't have a 16:9 view port? You disproportionally lose space at the top and bottom of the screen so the view port is wider than 16:9.
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  13. Member
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    It would've been too easy for that to occur to me *blush*
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  14. A Member since June, 2004 Keyser's Avatar
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    Maybe it's just me, but I really have a hard time trying to understand why people make such confusions about aspect ratios.

    If the original material is 4:3 then it is IMPOSSIBLE to properly display it in 16:9 without pillarboxing it or cropping it at the top and/or bottom. It's not rocket science!
    "The greatest trick the Devil ever pulled was convincing the world he didn't exist."
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