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  1. I want to make a special copy of a favorite movie of mine. Every retail [DVD] version only contains DD 5.1, yet the Blu-Ray includes DTS 5.1 sound. What I would like to do is create a copy of the movie with the DTS sound on the DVDR. Strip the DD 5.1 audio from the DVDR and then ripping DTS audio from the Blu-Ray, and then somehow add the DTS soundtrack to the DVDR.

    Does anyone know if and how this can be done?
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  2. Member
    Join Date: Aug 2006
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    Originally Posted by CineHD View Post
    I want to make a special copy of a favorite movie of mine. Every retail [DVD] version only contains DD 5.1, yet the Blu-Ray includes DTS 5.1 sound. What I would like to do is create a copy of the movie with the DTS sound on the DVDR. Strip the DD 5.1 audio from the DVDR and then ripping DTS audio from the Blu-Ray, and then somehow add the DTS soundtrack to the DVDR.

    Does anyone know if and how this can be done?
    It may be possible, but the new track must a perfect match and DVD compatible, which isn't necessarily going to be the case. See http://forum.videohelp.com/threads/288792-Easy-way-to-mux-new-audio-track-into-DVD for instructions.

    You may have to keep the DD track too. According to the DVD specification, DTS cannot be the only audio track. If muxman follows the spec to the letter with respect to audio, then it will require a second track with DD or PCM for an NTSC DVD. (For a PAL DVD you could use DD, PCM, or MPEG-1 Layer for the second track).
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  3. Member drjtech's Avatar
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    If there is a commentary track you could use it, DD 2.0 with a low bitrate, to meet the spec.
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    Join Date: Oct 2004
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    This is possible, but actually a bit complicated. First of all, you'll have to get the DTS 5.1 into true DTS 5.1 What you call "DTS 5.1" may actually be DTS-MA, which is not valid at all for DVD. There are programs that can strip the DTS core, as they call it, from DTS-MA. eac3to can do it I think. Another problem may be that DTS audio is fairly large so when you add it to the ripped DVD, you may end up with output so big that you have to burn to a dual layer DVD disc. If you have to burn to a dual layer disc, stick with Verbatim DVD+R DL for the best results and burn with the free program ImgBurn.

    I don't think muxman enforces strict DVD compliance so I think you could theoretically create a DVD with only DTS audio (I've got one that was done as a sort of test some years ago) and probably it will play in most DVD players, but if a player strictly enforces the standards it could be a problem if there isn't another valid audio track there.
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  5. Member wulf109's Avatar
    Join Date: Jul 2002
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    TSmuxer can downconvert DTS-HD to DTS.

    I did this with "A Boy And His Dog" I used PGCdemux to get the streams from the DVD. Then used Tsmuxer to create a downconverted DTS audio steam from the BR disk. Then authored the new DVD using the author module from Rejig.

    What movie is it?

    http://www.spannerworks.net/reference/10_6a.asp
    Last edited by wulf109; 22nd Aug 2014 at 16:08.
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  6. How bout this -- use MakeMKV, take the main title and the DTS 5.1 core track, make an MKV. Then shrink it down with something like Handbrake at 480p resolution (setting the width to 720 will give you DVD resolution (720x480 with the black bars cropped off)), use the DTS passthrough option for the audio.

    Then once that's done, do like wulf109 is saying, use TSmuxer and put it into a DVD-compliant format. Then - I don't see why you couldn't - use Imgburn to burn the folders to an .iso image, and .iso image then onto a DVD-R.

    By the way, I'd also use a DVD9 (dual-layer DVD) for this as it's going to give you way more headroom to work with as opposed to a DVD5 (single layer DVD). DTS audio takes significantly more space than AC3, so give yourself more room to work with.


    --Alternatively, I don't see why you couldn't just convert the lossless track to AC3 5.1 @ 448kbps, as this would probably sound as good as the DTS 5.1 core (since you're encoding from the lossless track) while using up less bandwidth, and it's going to allow the video to utilize the extra disc space.
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