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  1. Member
    Join Date: Jul 2014
    Location: MD
    Search Comp PM
    First off, I'd like to apologize if I missed a rule or a previous thread but I tried to dig through and couldn't find anything that was much help. Second I'd like to take the time to thank everyone/anyone for helping me.

    So I'm attempting to dual monitor with two of the same monitors, HP L1706s, which are VGA only. My graphics card, the AMD Radeon HD 6670 has one VGA, one HDMI(Which isn't going to be used), and finally a Dual-link DVI with HDCP. I've gotten a DYNEX DVI-A to VGA adapter/converter whatever you want to call it to try and use both monitors. However it doesn't even detect the other monitor. I've tested both VGA cords and both are working. I know that my computer's DVI is DVI-I dual link, and the package on the converter says that is compatible. I've checked that the driver is up to date, and attempted to mess with the options on the monitors however you can't really mess with it unless it is correctly set up to a computer. If needed, here is my Windows Version: Microsoft Windows 8 (build 9200), 64-bit.

    Thank you very much again, and I apologize if I've missed any information.

    EDIT: I believe I found the problem, which lies with my graphics card having a DVI-I that does not have both analog and digital like it should. Thank you anyways, and if I'm wrong and something else is the matter please let me know.
    Last edited by Darian_W; 28th Jul 2014 at 20:57. Reason: Found the problem
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  2. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2001
    Location: Deep in the Heart of Texas
    Search Comp PM
    Yeah, according to other info I found on the net, the card is actually DVI-D (digital only), not true DVD-I (combined digital+analog), nor DVI-A (analog only). Of course, this should be clear from the pinouts http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FileVI_Connector_Types.svg

    It was also mentioned that it could be the card only has one D->A engine (so only one VGA-type signal could be active at a time). However, this doesn't make sense to me, as a "single analog engine" card would have no need for true DVI-I + VGA.

    Dual-link vs. Single-link has nothing to do with it. That has to do with the max transfer/bit rate or "bandwidth" available.

    I suggest you also edit the thread's title to show that the question is solved.

    Scott
    "When will the rhetorical questions end?!" - George Carlin
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  3. Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    Yeah, according to other info I found on the net, the card is actually DVI-D (digital only), not true DVD-I (combined digital+analog), nor DVI-A (analog only). Of course, this should be clear from the pinouts http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FileVI_Connector_Types.svg
    Sometimes a DVI-D connector will have holes for the VGA pins (even though they're not attached to anything) so a DVI-I cable can be used for the digital connection.
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  4. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2001
    Location: Deep in the Heart of Texas
    Search Comp PM
    I hadn't heard of that one before. Sheesh, doesn't run counter to the point of having separate D, A, & I function options?

    Oh, I think I get it: they only make DVI-I cables, saves on inventory. Another engineering plan foiled by marketing.

    Scott
    "When will the rhetorical questions end?!" - George Carlin
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  5. Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    Oh, I think I get it: they only make DVI-I cables, saves on inventory.
    Or the user can just use the DVI-I cable they have sitting around. It probably cuts down on support calls ("my DVI cable doesn't fit in the socket!") since few people will be using VGA at this point. And those that are are probably using their old VGA cable.
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