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Thread: 30 or 60 FPS?

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  1. Member
    Join Date: Jul 2014
    Location: Purcellville, VA
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    I wasn't completely sure where to put this, so I just put it here. I love to video trains, and now that I have switched to my DSLR, I have a question. Next week, I am going to go out and shoot trains that travel at speeds up to 120-135 MPH. Wanting to make sure I have the smoothest video possible, which one should I use? Here is a video of what I would like my outcome to be...
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vj4jpidue54&list=UUPM71enJDIvahmirwWsHVvg .

    So what do you guys think? I am shooting with a Canon T2i and editing in Sony Movie Studio Platinum 12.

    Thanks,

    Mark
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  2. If you want the smoothest possible video, 60 fps. Go outside on a bright sunny day and shoot a medium speed smooth panning shot at 30 fps and 60 fps. Then come back in and compare the two. The 60 fps version will be glassy smooth. The 30 fps shot will be a jerky flickery mess.

    But playback options are more limited with 1080p60. Many devices can't play it smoothly. Youtube recently announced they would stream 60 fps video soon. For Blu-ray you can always convert to 1080i30 or 1080p30, or downscale to 1280p60.
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  3. Member
    Join Date: Jun 2012
    Location: USA
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    If there are several trains, why not try both? That's the only way to know which you prefer. You may also want to experiment with shutter speed to get the right combination of motion blur and clarity.
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  4. Member
    Join Date: May 2014
    Location: Tennessee, US
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    jagabo's right, but considering what your camera specs say, the best would be 1280x720 at 60p. The camera specs say it won't shoot 1920x1080 @60p. If you want BluRay compliant for final output, check this post: http://forum.doom9.org/showthread.php?t=154533.
    - My sister Ann's brother
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  5. Member
    Join Date: Jul 2014
    Location: Purcellville, VA
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    I can only video in 1280x720 60 FPS. Knowing that, what would be the best render settings in Sony Movie Studio Platinum 12 (very similar to Vegas) to maintain the smooth video but still get the best quality?

    Thanks for the responses everyone,

    Mark
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  6. Member
    Join Date: Jun 2012
    Location: USA
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    Your best project settings will always be to match your footage. Your best render settings are determined by how the video is to be viewed -- Blu Ray, internet, theatrical projection, phone....

    As a rule of thumb, higher bitrate and higher image size = higher quality. (But there are a lot of exceptions.)
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  7. Member 2Bdecided's Avatar
    Join Date: Nov 2007
    Location: United Kingdom
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    That's 30fps (the maximum on Youtube at present), and shot with a fast shutter speed (almost no blur).

    60 or 30, fast or slow shutter - neither choice is "correct" - you must choose what you prefer.
    There are plenty of films (and videos shot to look like film) of trains - that's 24fps.

    Is it only for on-line, or only to watch on a TV, or both?

    Most modern TVs will interpolate 30fps to make it look like 60fps anyway.

    Cheers,
    David.
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  8. Member
    Join Date: Jul 2014
    Location: Purcellville, VA
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    It will be posted online, I don't have any plans on putting on a TV.

    Mark
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  9. Member
    Join Date: Jul 2014
    Location: Purcellville, VA
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    Thanks smrpix, I think I might video in 1920x1080 30FPS and use a higher shutter speed. You guys think 1/125th second will do a good job?

    Thanks for all of the replies everyone, really appreciate the help...

    Mark
    Last edited by Necer149; 19th Jul 2014 at 05:31.
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  10. Member budwzr's Avatar
    Join Date: Apr 2007
    Location: City Of Angels
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    60fps or faster is normally used to capture smooth slow motion.
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