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  1. Member
    Join Date: Jul 2014
    Location: Bedfordshire, East Anglia, UK
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    Hello, I'm new to this website, I've got a question about using NTSC vhs tapes in the UK using a certain VCR.

    Sorry if this subject has been covered before.

    I have an AKAI VCR which is capable of playing both PAL and NTSC.

    I have a few TVs.

    I tried playing an American video tape on the AKAI VCR and the picture was rolling upwards, however it was in color.

    I tried using a different TV and it played fine, no problem.

    My question is how is this possible? Both TVs are quite old, however the one it worked on has recently been repaired and the repair guys did say they repaired the vertical hold, so I don't know if they modified it to cope with both PAL and NTSC.
    Can some modern components achieve this?

    Then, to see if it made any difference, I tried using a modulator (which is used to connect modern SCART/composite leads to a TV with only a coaxial/aerial socket) and this time it worked fine on both TVs.

    How exactly is the modulator helping?

    Does it make any difference if the modulator receives an analogue signal instead of a digital one? Normally it converts digital to analogue.

    Sorry again if this bores or confuses anyone, but I would love to hear what any video enthusiasts have to say on these subjects.

    Jack.
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  2. Member turk690's Avatar
    Join Date: Jul 2003
    Location: ON, Canada
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    I suppose the TVs you are talking about are tube TVs.
    It was rolling upwards on one TV because the sync produced by the VCR is too low for said TV to lock in. That it is in color says VCR is playing and demodulating it properly. The other TV played it fine because this TV likely beefs up the sync and/or replaces it with its own.
    The modulator does the same. It is all analogue. No digital signals or conversions involved here.
    Thanks for your post. I feel like it's the 80s again.
    Stop feeling suicidal just because he unfriended you on fezbuk.
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  3. Member
    Join Date: Jul 2014
    Location: Bedfordshire, East Anglia, UK
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    Thank you for replying! I love your comment - I've got a lot of 80s stuff - my favourite era for entertainment.

    I know the only thing I'm working with is an analogue signal, but all I meant was that the modulator is specifically meant for receiving signals from a modern DVD player which obviously outputs a digital signal.

    Obviously I realize the modulator's output will always be analogue, but does it make any difference if the signal it receives is analogue? I don't want to risk damaging it.

    I am impressed if some tube TVs are capable of boosting the signal they receive! Yes, they are both tube TVs. They are wood effect casing as well. No, I'm not joking!

    Jack
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  4. Member hech54's Avatar
    Join Date: Jul 2001
    Location: Yank in Europe
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    UK equipment didn't always accept NTSC signals. I suppose it's possible that some of your equipment was made before the change happened. Nowadays only the DVD region code or blu ray zones are problems.
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  5. Originally Posted by camcorderlover View Post
    a modern DVD player which obviously outputs a digital signal.
    Only at the HDMI output. If you use the composite, s-video, or RGB output it's analog.

    Originally Posted by camcorderlover View Post
    Obviously I realize the modulator's output will always be analogue, but does it make any difference if the signal it receives is analogue? I don't want to risk damaging it.
    If you're talking about an RF modulator -- it takes an analog signal and RF modulates it so that the TV's over-the-air tuner can be used (in the absence of a composite, s-video, or RGB input).

    Originally Posted by camcorderlover View Post
    I am impressed if some tube TVs are capable of boosting the signal they receive!
    It has nothing to do with boosting the signal. Most PAL TVs are designed to display PAL and PAL60. The latter is a hybrid of NTSC and PAL. NTSC timing (59.94 fields per second) with a PAL color carrier. PAL VHS decks normally put out a PAL60 signal when playing VHS tapes. Look for a setting on your VHS deck that changes the output from NTSC to PAL60.
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  6. Member
    Join Date: Jul 2014
    Location: Bedfordshire, East Anglia, UK
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    Originally Posted by hech54 View Post
    UK equipment didn't always accept NTSC signals. I suppose it's possible that some of your equipment was made before the change happened. Nowadays only the DVD region code or blu ray zones are problems.
    The point I was making was the TV which gave a perfect picture and sound on it's own was manufactured long before NTSC was accepted by UK TVs, yet it is NOT rolling the picture vertically.

    How is this TV handling the signal when the other TV (just as old) can't? It's the same VCR I'm using.

    Jack
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  7. Member
    Join Date: Jun 2012
    Location: USA
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    Originally Posted by camcorderlover View Post
    How is this TV handling the signal when the other TV (just as old) can't? It's the same VCR I'm using.
    Assuming it isn't an NTSC>PAL issue, it's locking onto the sync signal better than the other -- happens all the time in analog. Does your "worse" tv have a vertical hold (vhold) adjustment? Most do.
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  8. Member
    Join Date: Jul 2014
    Location: Bedfordshire, East Anglia, UK
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    Originally Posted by smrpix View Post
    Originally Posted by camcorderlover View Post
    How is this TV handling the signal when the other TV (just as old) can't? It's the same VCR I'm using.
    Assuming it isn't an NTSC>PAL issue, it's locking onto the sync signal better than the other -- happens all the time in analog. Does your "worse" tv have a vertical hold (vhold) adjustment? Most do.
    Hello, no it doesn't have a vertical hold adjustment, although I have used TVs that do.

    The "worse" TV does however work with an RF modulator. I'm guessing the modulator is adjusting the signal to a level that the "worse" TV can lock onto?

    Can anyone tell me, if DVDs have a digital signal recorded onto them, how are DVD players sending out an analog signal to the TV?
    Is the DVD player converting the digital signal from the DVD into analog?

    And why does composite (AV cables) give a better picture/sound than coaxial/aerial leads? Assuming they are both analog.

    Jack
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  9. Member
    Join Date: Jun 2012
    Location: USA
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    Brief overview:

    DVD is digital.
    A digital signal can be output over HDMI or DV.

    The signal is converted to analog for the following, worst quality to best:

    RF (coaxial) -- literally a signal broadcast through a wire and picked up by a receiver in the TV
    Composite
    S-Video
    Component

    Obviously, not all DVD players have all the options.
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  10. Member DB83's Avatar
    Join Date: Jul 2007
    Location: United Kingdom
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    Long before ?

    UK TV's have had no issues with NTSC since the 80's. Really early tv's , again as stated, did have vertical sync issues

    As jagabo states, many VCRs have a NTSC on PAL equipment setting. Some do it automatically but not ALL.
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  11. A black and white picture indicates the VCR is putting out PAL60 and the TV is set to display NTSC, or the VCR is putting out NTSC and the TV is set to display PAL60.
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