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  1. Member
    Join Date: Jul 2014
    Location: USA
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    Hi. I am an amature videographer. I'm getting started on a project where I'll be interviewing individuals and couples, i.e., one or two people at a time. The interviews will take place indoors in a medium size room or a hotel living room area.

    I don't have much of a budget, so I'm looking to get the cheapest package necessary to get the work done. I'm starting out with two tripod mounted Panasonic PVGS250 mini-dv video cameras, one for a static wide shot, and one to get close-ups. I've got a nice external shotgun mic for sound.

    So now I am trying to decide what to do about lighting. I'd like to augment the available indoor lighting, and I see two ways to go. I'm looking for opinions about which way would be better.

    Option 1. Put a Neewer CN-216 LED light on a tripod, and use the diffuser filter to light the subjects from a slight angle off to the side. This option is very portable and offers high flexibility.

    Option 2: Get a LimoStudio umbrella portrait kit. This option takes up more space and requires electric outlets, so it is less flexible. However, if offers the ability to do fill and back lighting.

    Both options cost about the same (around $65), so I'm wondering if anyone has opinions about one over the other.

    Thanks!

    Ken
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  2. Member
    Join Date: Jun 2012
    Location: USA
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    I don't think you'll be happy with either. The Neweer tends towards green, and draining batteries will change the lighting level over the course of the shoot. The Umbrella kit is underpowered at 45w per bulb (some reviewers say that's misleading and it's actually 22!)

    Lighting of course is all about direction and proportion, but neither of these are an adequate key. Try to use window light to your advantage. Also consider lav mics.
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  3. Member
    Join Date: Aug 2002
    Location: South Florida
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    Your option 2. is the way to go but, you need more wattage than 45 about double. I have had no problems, in my experience, using umbrellas.
    You can try these bulbs : http://www.amazon.com/KAEZI-Watt-Studio-Light-5500K/dp/B00BISL11U
    Last edited by pepegot1; 13th Jul 2014 at 15:17.
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  4. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2001
    Location: Deep in the Heart of Texas
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    If your budget is truly less than $100, nothing is going to work great. Don't waste your budget resources on portable/battery devices, that's just consumer fluff until you get into the $$$ range. At your level, it makes more sense to have DIY rigs built from off-the-shelf lamps, reflectors & sheers.

    Scott
    Last edited by Cornucopia; 14th Jul 2014 at 13:29.
    "When will the rhetorical questions end?!" - George Carlin
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  5. Member budwzr's Avatar
    Join Date: Apr 2007
    Location: City Of Angels
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    Get clamp lights, the silver old fashioned looking ones, and some different wattage bulbs. They're not all pro looking, but you can probably get six of them for under $100.
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  6. Member
    Join Date: Jul 2014
    Location: USA
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    budwzr--clamp lights are a really good idea! I'll get a lot more light for the money, and it should be fine for what I'm doing. Back of a chair should make a fine light stand. You think CFL bulbs should do the trick? What wattages would you recommend trying? I'll go to the site next week to try some out. Thanks!
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  7. Member budwzr's Avatar
    Join Date: Apr 2007
    Location: City Of Angels
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    I don't know what wattage. Enough to create the look you want.
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  8. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2001
    Location: Deep in the Heart of Texas
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    You shouldn't use CFL, or ANY fluorescent types for that matter, unless you can be assured of proper color balance with them. Supercheap-->Incandescent. Higher tier-->LED (or filtered/balanced/balanceable Fluorescent).

    Scott
    Last edited by Cornucopia; 14th Jul 2014 at 13:42.
    "When will the rhetorical questions end?!" - George Carlin
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  9. Member budwzr's Avatar
    Join Date: Apr 2007
    Location: City Of Angels
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    Exactly. Try to match the ambient lighting. That way any color grading later will affect the whole shot evenly. You don't want warm light on a cool background, and vice versa.
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