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  1. Member
    Join Date: Jun 2014
    Location: cairo
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    I have SONY hard drive.. I dropped it a while ago it worked fine immediately after the drop but then it stopped working.. it still has the light on when connected but it doesn't flash or vibrate from inside and when I connect it to my laptop it doesn't recognize it at all. I had windows 8.1 as operating system but when I looked for a solution someone said the Linux fedora could recognize the external hard drive and fix it.. so I downloaded the live image and it did recognize the hard but when I tried to access it it said " you don't have permission to access the contents of this folder" so I installed fedora to have root authority but after completing the install and rebooting the laptop it won't recognize the hard drive any more..
    what does that mean?!! can my drive be fixed or should I just say goodbye although it was still new not a month old when it dropped..
    please HELP
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  2. Member turk690's Avatar
    Join Date: Jul 2003
    Location: ON, Canada
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    When a hard drive is dropped that's it, the end, time for a new one.
    Stop feeling suicidal just because he unfriended you on fezbuk.
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  3. Renegade gll99's Avatar
    Join Date: May 2002
    Location: Canadian Tundra
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    I lost an internal 1TB that way. It was dropped right on it's end on a carpeted floor from 3+ feet up. Worked fine immediately after and for a couple of days then went unrecognized. Luckily I had copied everything right away expecting trouble. No zero format, no recovery, nothing works. Its brand and model # does get seen by some format programs but they can't work with it. That's it outside or inside windows, Linux or dos, nothing works. All I get is bad sector after bad sector with the lowest level scanning or format programs. I even tried the freezer method, a usb enclosure but no go. It's dead.

    Yours is likely the same although the message you got in Linux might indicate some life. I never got that much after it went dead. Even if somehow you get past this I'd say don't trust it make sure you have a backup of anything you put on it.
    There's not much to do but then I can't do much anyway.
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  4. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2005
    Location: 666th portal
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    since sony doesn't make hard drives i assume you mean a hard drive in a usb enclosure? if so you may have killed the usb enclosure but not the drive inside. take it out of the enclosure and test the drive directly via sata or a sata to usb converter.
    --
    "a lot of people are better dead" - prisoner KSC2-303
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  5. The odds are pretty good the hard drive is dead. I'm a fairly experienced hard drive dropper. Even my cat has had a shot at it (knocking one off the desk). If the drive is running when it's dropped the chances of it surviving for long are virtually zero. Even if it's not running at the time the chances aren't good. I had one die about a year after it was dropped but it wasn't used much in between. Just for extra storage.

    There's a slim chance you damaged the case or the electronics within (maybe open it up for a look if you can) but it's most likely the drive.
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  6. Member
    Join Date: Jun 2014
    Location: cairo
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    yes it's external hard drive in usb enclosure... I'll try to remove the enclosure and try it again.. but if it didn't work, is there anyway I can get my data from it :/ I didn't have enough time to backup
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  7. Member
    Join Date: Nov 2003
    Location: West Texas
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    Originally Posted by archfotna View Post
    yes it's external hard drive in usb enclosure... I'll try to remove the enclosure and try it again.. but if it didn't work, is there anyway I can get my data from it :/ I didn't have enough time to backup
    To do it yourself, the drive will have to be recognized by your computer. There are free programs like Recuva or Puran File Recovery, but a commercial program like GetDataBack would probably be better in this case. The free version of GetDataBack will let you examine the drive (if it can find it) and it will show the files that the program can recover, but will not actually do that without paying the registration.

    Or you can send the drive to a professional shop that does data recovery. This will be very expensive.
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