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  1. Member
    Join Date: Sep 2005
    Location: China
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    I have seen some bluetooth transmitters advertised for a relatively low price. I am looking at buying a low end 5.1 ss system for my entertainment room and was thinking about using 2 of these transmitters for the rear speakers. There is a power outlet near each one, and the transmitters I am looking at can be run on a charger. Will this reduce the quality of the sound from the rear speakers?
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  2. How will you drive the speakers, to they have a built-in amplifier? I take it the Bluetooth transmitter include a Bluetooth receiver with RCA or headphone outputs.

    It's hard to say whether that will noticeably degrade the sound quality. The transmitter has to convert the analog audio to digital, there could be some degradation here depending on the quality of the A/D converter circuit. Then, the receiver has to convert it back to analog. Again, the quality of the D/A converter matters, especially the analog filtering that follows.

    Anything that's powered through an AC power line could introduce hum. It all depends on design and construction quality.

    Retail price is not necessarily an indication of quality as much as the intended purpose of the device would be. A transmitter/receiver combo that's meant to be used in a sound system should give better results than something that's meant for PA.

    OTH, you're "buying a low end 5.1 ss system" so the question is how much degradation are you willing to accept. After all this, the only answer is you have to try it to find out. That shouldn't be too much trouble if you buy it from a place that has a decent return policy.
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  3. Member themaster1's Avatar
    Join Date: Nov 2006
    Location: France
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    I'm not a big bluetooth fan, each time i connect my smartphone to my pc to listen music i'm in trouble, a simple finger in front of the smartphone and no more sound or Gibberish...just saying.
    On the other end wifi works good (with apps like soundwire i can listen my tv's sound with my smartphone, no need of a wireless headset with background noise etc..)
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  4. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2001
    Location: Deep in the Heart of Texas
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    Note also that for BT to work with most products, they have to be compliant with one of the common profiles/protocols. The most likely one would be A2DP.
    Understand that this does NOT natively support uncompressed LPCM audio, instead they are likely transmitted as mp3, aac, etc. Which means you will be (noticeably?) losing quality, even compared to the original soundfiles, when using BT.

    Scott
    "When will the rhetorical questions end?!" - George Carlin
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  5. Mod Neophyte Super Moderator redwudz's Avatar
    Join Date: Sep 2002
    Location: AZ, USA
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    I would probably give it a try if the BT setup is inexpensive enough. The rear surrounds are mainly for low level background and a bit of quality loss may not be noticeable.

    I have a neighbor with the same problem. He has a concrete slab floor and a cathedral ceiling, so really no access to run wires for the rear channels. I set him up with some RF remote speakers and they work OK most of the time. They do tend to lose lock with each other on occasion and need to be reset. Hopefully BT would work a bit better for this.

    My cell phone uses BT to communicate with my cars cellphone setup and it still works about half a block away when I forget and leave the phone in the front room. I had no idea BT transmitted that far.
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