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  1. I was given a Symphonic 6300 VCR. It seems to work, but the picture is a bit washed out and fuzzy. It also sometimes creases the edge of the tapes. Is this worth restoring?
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  2. Member
    Join Date: May 2014
    Location: Tennessee, US
    Search Comp PM
    No. You can get a new Funai (better, but still isn't saying much) by hopping over to Walmart to look for a Toshiba or Magnavox. If they're still selling. They're made by Funai. Might do better to find a decent Panasonic or Panasonic clone from the mid to late 1990's.
    -ann's brother
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  3. Member drjtech's Avatar
    Join Date: Jun 2003
    Location: Northern Virginia
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    They probably don't have them in the store, but you can still get DVD/VCR combos from Walmart online.

    http://www.walmart.com/search/search-ng.do?ic=16_0&Find=Find&search_query=vcr&Find=Fin...h_constraint=0
    They that give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty or safety.
    --Benjamin Franklin
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  4. I don't want to buy a new "funai" VCR. The one I have is all metal and is built like a tank.
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  5. I also have a Sylvania VCR from 1988
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  6. Member
    Join Date: May 2014
    Location: Tennessee, US
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by vintagevcr View Post
    I don't want to buy a new "funai" VCR. The one I have is all metal and is built like a tank.
    The model was manufactured about 1989-1990. Back then, almost all VCR's were metal cased and were far more hefty than the paperclip-weights of the late 1990's and later. If you're interested in the unit for use or as a collector's piece, it's your choice. Even if you did a bangup job of rebuilding it, don't expect prosumer performance. I recall the Symphonic line way back then as being budget goods. The number of VCR techs around the world is smaller than the tiny town down South where I came from (pop. 138). If by restoring you mean running a tape head cleaner thru it or something like that, you're in for a disappointment. Even if an old VCR isn't used, aging takes a toll on capacitors, resistors and other components, dried up or stretched drive belts, oxidized clutch gears and capstan drives, and rubber capstans that have turned into rocks. Replacing parts means realigning and the skill and equipment to do it.

    Not saying it can't be done, but you might have to hook up with some collectors who have a similar interest and the wherewithal to pursue it.
    -ann's brother
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  7. Restoring as in new belts, manual head cleaning, new pinch roller, lubrication, ect. I guess my main question should be, are those mechanisms robust?
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