VideoHelp Forum
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 4 of 4
Thread

  1. Canada : Police need warrant to get subscriber identities from ISPs: Supreme Court


    OTTAWA -- The police need a search warrant to get information from Internet service providers about their subscribers' identities during investigations, the Supreme Court of Canada says in a landmark ruling affirming Canadians' right to online privacy.

    The high court's 8-0 ruling Friday on online privacy issues came in the appeal of a Saskatchewan man facing child pornography charges. The court affirmed that when Canadians surf the web, they should be guaranteed a degree of anonymity.

    The ruling also has political implications for the federal government's current cyber-bullying bill, setting the stage for another clash between the Harper government and the Supreme Court.

    The ruling deals with a 19-year-old Saskatchewan man who was charged with possessing and distributing child pornography after police used his Internet address to get further details from his online service provider, all without first obtaining a search warrant.

    ... ... ...
    ... ... ...
    According to Teksavvy’s - a one of leading Canadian ISP's transparency report, the company rejects two out of every three police requests for information. In Roger’s case, the company received 174,917 requests in 2013 for customer information from government and law enforcement agencies. This is 480 requests a day and one request per every 11 Rogers subscribers. 74,000 of these requests were court orders which means approximately 100,000 did not include warrants.
    Last edited by enim; 16th Jun 2014 at 18:02.
    Quote Quote  
  2. Renegade gll99's Avatar
    Join Date: May 2002
    Location: Canadian Tundra
    Search Comp PM
    In their ruling the judges should have made a few exceptions such as the type of crime brought before them when they made the ruling, gang activity and national security cases.
    There's not much to do but then I can't do much anyway.
    Quote Quote  
  3. In their ruling the judges should have made a few exceptions such as the type of crime brought before them when they made the ruling, gang activity and national security cases.
    - agreed.
    In order to protect the privacy of innocent subscriber those who are not involved in criminal activities of any sort, all ISPs must must be legally allowed to run a free Criminal Background Check in return whenever any police officer request arbitrary to disclose any subscriber's details.

    All ISPs must charge some minimum $9.99 fees as well to the authorities, as they are already in business of selling services.
    This is North America where Nothing Is Free!
    Last edited by enim; 17th Jun 2014 at 00:42.
    Quote Quote  
  4. Mod Neophyte Super Moderator redwudz's Avatar
    Join Date: Sep 2002
    Location: USA
    Search Comp PM
    Not 'Latest Video News': Moving to Computer Forum.

    Moderator redwudz
    Quote Quote