VideoHelp Forum
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2
1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 33
Thread
  1. Member
    Join Date: May 2014
    Location: Florida
    Search Comp PM
    Hello!

    First forum, gotta make it count! My studio is slowly but surely coming along, but I was wondering what kind of lens do you use for vlogs? Currently, I have a canon rebel t4i, and use the stock lens. Im wondering if there are lenses better suited for vlogs. Maybe a prime lens?

    Im still very much new to the world of video, but Im eager to learn more.

    Thanks in advance!
    Quote Quote  
  2. Member hech54's Avatar
    Join Date: Jul 2001
    Location: Yank in Europe
    Search Comp PM
    An iPhone in good light is a better choice for video than 90% of the DSLRs out there. Go smack the person who suggested a DSLR to you for video.
    Quote Quote  
  3. Member
    Join Date: May 2014
    Location: Florida
    Search Comp PM
    Really? Why? =-O
    I thought my Canon gets some good stuff.
    Quote Quote  
  4. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2005
    Location: 666th portal
    Search Comp PM
    canon makes great stuff. the hard part of using that dslr is overcoming the dslr part. no autofocus, no auto levels while shooting, very short record time, and the sensor overheating. other than that it make great video. good primes are worthy additions like the 50mm f1.2, 35mm f1.4 and some variable zooms like the ef 24-105mm
    --
    "a lot of people are better dead" - prisoner KSC2-303
    Quote Quote  
  5. Member
    Join Date: May 2014
    Location: Florida
    Search Comp PM
    Puss: Thank you for that info.

    Although, my camera does have auto focus. Is that preferred for vlogs? I was always told manual is better.

    As for short record time...yeah, I've run into that occasionally. Thanks for the lens options, ill check 'em out.
    Quote Quote  
  6. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2005
    Location: 666th portal
    Search Comp PM
    manual is better for stationary subjects then there is no "lens wander" possible.
    --
    "a lot of people are better dead" - prisoner KSC2-303
    Quote Quote  
  7. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2001
    Location: Deep in the Heart of Texas
    Search Comp PM
    @hech54, you are totally WRONG, especially WRT Vlog shoots (like interviews, tutes)!
    There is much better dynamic range, much better control of DOF and you have multiple lens choices with DSLR video vs. iPhone, etc. Plus, the "rolling shutter" problem is not even noticeable when there isn't a great deal of motion going on (particularly lens motion). Unless your vlog is outdoor POV stuff, it should be fine. The LARGER sensors in them really make a difference WRT dynamic range & noise & light sensitivity.

    Most DSLRs give you a CHOICE of Autofocus or Manual, AutoExposure (Iris, Shutter, ISO) or Manual, AutoWB or Manual, so I don't know where you're getting your info from.

    Yes, record time (due to overheating or formatting or legal constraints) is usually limited to 11-29 minutes (depending on the model). That is an area that affects MANY types of cameras, including phones. If you need over 30minutes of Uninterrupted shooting for each clip, then you should only go with standard consumer or pro video camcorders.

    You don't say exactly which model lens(es) you got with it, so I will refrain from guessing. Whether what you have something appropriate or not all depends on what look you are trying to go for. DOF, FOV, Lighting, all come into play here.

    A "professional" usually has a toolkit of a couple of primes and a couple of (overlapping) zooms (or one Super-zoom).

    Having shot using multiple camera types, I can say from experience, that (in the right hands) the level of quality you'd get from the various cam types falls along the lines of this list (in descending order of quality):

    1. Global-shutter Digital Cinema Cams
    2. Pro/Broadcast video Cams
    3. DSLR Cams
    4. Prosumer video Cams
    5. GoPro POV Cams
    6. Consumer Point&Shoot video Cams
    7. Phone cams

    Again, it depends on what kind of look you are going for, as different priorities would reshuffle that list.

    Scott
    Last edited by Cornucopia; 22nd May 2014 at 15:26.
    "When will the rhetorical questions end?!" - George Carlin
    Quote Quote  
  8. Member
    Join Date: May 2014
    Location: Florida
    Search Comp PM
    Corn// This is the lens I'm currently using: http://www.amazon.com/Canon-18-135mm-3-5-5-6-Standard-Digital/dp/B002NEGTT2/ref=sr_1_1...+lens+18-135mm

    My question is what lens is ideal for shooting vlog/reviews etc.

    This is my first vlog. Ever. (Pay no attention to the slightly off audio, camera focus, resolution, and poor lighting! That is all to be fixed in the near future! All a learning experience, baby!)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5svQt75_aB4

    Thank you for your feedback.
    Quote Quote  
  9. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2001
    Location: Deep in the Heart of Texas
    Search Comp PM
    That's an OK/Decent lens, if not "ideal". Any zoom lens over ~8:1 ratio will have to make a compromise somewhere: $$ cost, ## weight/size, < optical quality (through the whole range?), < lens speed. Which one(s) depends on your priorities.

    If you don't have PRIMES (but you have a little to spend), now would be a good time to get one. Normal, then Wide, then Tele (unless you're doing wildlife or portraiture, then get a tele sooner). Primes are much less cost, much sharper optics, and much faster. What you lose is the zoom capability. But for preset shooting (interviews, reviews, fiction movies), you may not need that anyway, as you can compose and place the camera as necessary to get the FOV you need.

    I agree that ALL those items need fixing, also if you are going to do pans with a DSLR, you need a good true fluid head tripod and learn to pan smoothly & SLOWLY (otherwise the rolling shutter will give you that objectionable "jello" effect). Good clean graphics compositing, though. Also, check your WB (white balance, aka color temperature) - it looked too warm/yellow.

    Work on doing things MANUALLY - focus, shutter speed, aperture, ISO gain, WB.

    Scott
    "When will the rhetorical questions end?!" - George Carlin
    Quote Quote  
  10. Member
    Join Date: May 2014
    Location: Florida
    Search Comp PM
    Corn// Pardon me if I'm getting a little confused, but... you're telling me this would be a decent prime lens to get me going? http://www.amazon.com/Canon-50mm-1-8-Camera-Lens/dp/B00007E7JU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=...non+prime+lens (I have no need for wide/tele etc ...yet)

    I have a great fluid head tripod, but as you can see I need some work using it. As for WB/CT I have absolutely no idea how to go about changing/working with that. Also, the light I was using is very much yellow. (But I just got my new lighting kit yesterday and rest assured there will be WHITE LIGHT!)

    Out of all the things you said, focus was the only thing I've done manually. Everything else...I need to do some serious homework on.
    If you know of any links that thoroughly explain shutter speed/aperture, ISO gain and WB could you kindly link me?
    Quote Quote  
  11. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
    Join Date: Jun 2003
    Location: dFAQ.us/lordsmurf
    Search Comp PM
    Well, hech54 does have a point, in a way. The video from DSLRs are still fairly blah. It's closer now, but still blah. The ideal video DSLR just does not exist yet.

    Primes won't really matter on video. Sharpness is not a factor -- THE reason to use primes -- as the video is downscaled from the max megapixel of the sensor. Just use a decent ISO, shutter of 60, and set aperture to at least f.8 (but no higher than f/11, as diffraction tends to hit at 11 or so). Tripod mount it, and don't make any super-fast movement in frame.

    The APS-C crop factor of the T4i is less sharp than a full-frame (5D) already.

    No offense intended, but the Rebels are all soccer mom cameras. Don't expect pro work. It has quirks and small issues that hit quality. And unless you're spending $1k+ for a lens (L glass for Canon), it's often not that great (aside from the 50 1.8 prime). Kit lens are fine for a Rebel body and video. L glass won't really be noticeable unless you shoot FF.

    Whoever told you that manual focus is "better" doesn't know what he/she is talking about. The only cases where this is true is:
    - the lens backfocuses (tip: FIX IT!)
    - the shot is macro or near macro, and DOF that shallow can be hard to auto
    - the focal plane will not change, and you turn AF off so as to not accidentally change the focus

    Manual exposure, however, is always suggested.
    Quote Quote  
  12. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2001
    Location: Deep in the Heart of Texas
    Search Comp PM
    That is a very decent lens to use - IF your needs are such that you can afford to adjust cam positioning to get the framing & sizing you need! If you need more variability, you will still need a zoom lens of some sort. Why not have both (since the prime isn't that expensive)!?
    Also, remember that Canon APS-C sensor format is ~1.6x the crop factor of Full Frame 35mm. So a 50mm prime used on a Canon APS-C sensor (like your T4i is) is equivalent to a 80mm lens on a FF35mm cam. Right in the zone for portraiture. NOT good, if you need a wider angle to cover full body+surroundings (would need a WA for that, say 24mm~=35mmFFequiv).

    Read up on the manual for your T4i. I am confident that it has not only an "Auto" setting, but also a number of common presets (3200 incandescent, flourescent, 5600 daylight, etc), as well as a Manual/Custom preset (also good for mixed lighting).

    re: FOCUS, I noticed that you focused much farther away that you should if you were wanting yourself(?) to be in focus. It doesn't hurt to go old-school and actually use a tape measure and set the focus by the numbers.

    There are many sites that talk about that...I'll have to look some up first. Don't forget to look up photography sites as well as videography sites. The 2 have MUCH visually in common.

    Scott
    "When will the rhetorical questions end?!" - George Carlin
    Quote Quote  
  13. Member hech54's Avatar
    Join Date: Jul 2001
    Location: Yank in Europe
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    @hech54, you are totally WRONG, especially WRT Vlog shoots (like interviews, tutes)!
    There is much better dynamic range, much better control of DOF and you have multiple lens choices with DSLR video vs. iPhone, etc. Plus, the "rolling shutter" problem is not even noticeable when there isn't a great deal of motion going on (particularly lens motion). Unless your vlog is outdoor POV stuff, it should be fine. The LARGER sensors in them really make a difference WRT dynamic range & noise & light sensitivity.

    Most DSLRs give you a CHOICE of Autofocus or Manual, AutoExposure (Iris, Shutter, ISO) or Manual, AutoWB or Manual, so I don't know where you're getting your info from.
    I get my info from my Nikon D90, my Canon Ixus 90IS, and both my iPod Touch and my iPhone4s. If I want to shoot video, especially for a something like a Vlog, I reach for anything BUT my DSLR, even if I have my 35mm f1.8 mounted to the D90.
    Yes DSLRs have gotten better at video, but for a vlog, talking about larger sensors is like the old saying:
    If you can't dazzle them with the brilliance, baffle them with the bullshit.
    Quote Quote  
  14. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2001
    Location: Deep in the Heart of Texas
    Search Comp PM
    I'm a little surprised at you, lordsmurf. I just wish I could have had this kind of "blah" back in the days of analog camcorders! ("...we used to dream of living in a corridor. It would have been a palace to us...")

    Of course primes matter on video (or digital cinema). Less lens elements (esp. moving ones) = less aberrations = better picture. You only use a zoom when you NEED a zoom. I suspect that people who grew up using ONLY video camcorders, and NOT celluloid cinema cameras nor eCinema cameras, haven't had the capability of seeing the alternative, and so are biased. I've had chances to use all 3 (more actually), and was taught methodically why one uses a certain type of lens, so I know their relative strengths & weaknesses.

    For vlogging & similar, I would say the other shooting tips are good points.

    BUT...this whole "doesn't know what they're talking about" is a major stretch.
    The part about
    the focal plane will not change, and you turn AF off so as to not accidentally change the focus
    covers the great majority of vlogging & interview situations.

    But you also left out these other "exceptions":
    When shooting through a window, fence, mirror, or other obstruction
    When shooting a fast-moving object (sports, wildlife)
    When shooting in low light
    When following a certain path of focal change for creative effect
    When the shifting object of your "subject of interest" does not match the cam's "focus region of interest"

    Which means there are lots of times where manual is better, and many times where auto is ok, and a few where it (AF) is better.

    ***********************

    @hech54, I say this not to insult you, but a D90 is almost a dinosaur in the fast-changing world of DSLRs-with-video. It has only 3200ISO max (and while that shouldn't mean a lot if your are shooting less than that anyway, newer models have raised the ceiling and have also lowered the noise level on the middle ranges, allowing for much WIDER latitude of usable shot options), its MAX framerate is 720p24, and even that is constrained by the fact that it shoots in AVI format, 2GB or 5 minutes max (whichever comes first), using an MJPEG codec at only 20Mbps. That isn't even as good as the video my Fuji W3 camera can do (also 720p24, but 12min or 4GB @ 25MbpsMJPEG AVI). In fact, the D90 was notable as the FIRST Nikon DSLR with HD video capability, and it looks almost as if it were an afterthought.
    Given your experience with that, I understand the tendency to shouting "sour grapes".
    Know that Nikon has been slower on the uptake of true video-friendly features than Canon has, but it has made great strides in the last few years. Less noisy sensor, longer shooting time, higher resolution, wider dynamic range, more efficient compression, less noticeable rolling shutter,...
    I recently got a Nikon D3200, which is at the low end of their prosumer video-capable line. Yet, it has an nice APS-C sensor, shoots clean ISO1600 (though it can go up 8x higher if necessary), records for 19minutes to card, or 29minutes out to live clean HDMI, records 1080i60, 1080p30 or 720p60 (or many other lesser options), allows for adjustable control of all parameters during video shooting mode (except of course framerate & it's minimum shutter speed), DOES NOT OVERHEAT - even after 18+ solid hours of usage! (which I did 2 weeks ago), saves to card as AVC MOV @ 25Mbps. Needless to say, it does the job admirably. And during that recent shoot I pitted it against a prosumer Panny camcorder ($1000 X920, IIRC) run by my colleague, shooting a 2nd angle of the same subject, and the Nikon was HANDS DOWN better in every aspect, except continuous runtime and remote/motorized zoom capability.
    So, I'd have to say that you may want to revisit DSLR video now. Lots has been improved to the point where you may prefer it (or at least tolerate it).

    Scott
    Last edited by Cornucopia; 23rd May 2014 at 03:17.
    "When will the rhetorical questions end?!" - George Carlin
    Quote Quote  
  15. Member hech54's Avatar
    Join Date: Jul 2001
    Location: Yank in Europe
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    @hech54, I say this not to insult you, but a D90 is almost a dinosaur in the fast-changing world of DSLRs-with-video. It has only 3200ISO max (and while that shouldn't mean a lot if your are shooting less than that anyway, newer models have raised the ceiling and have also lowered the noise level on the middle ranges, allowing for much WIDER latitude of usable shot options), its MAX framerate is 720p24, and even that is constrained by the fact that it shoots in AVI format, 2GB or 5 minutes max (whichever comes first), using an MJPEG codec at only 20Mbps. That isn't even as good as the video my Fuji W3 camera can do (also 720p24, but 12min or 4GB @ 25MbpsMJPEG AVI). In fact, the D90 was notable as the FIRST Nikon DSLR with HD video capability, and it looks almost as if it were an afterthought.
    Given your experience with that, I understand the tendency to shouting "sour grapes".
    Know that Nikon has been slower on the uptake of true video-friendly features than Canon has, but it has made great strides in the last few years. Less noisy sensor, longer shooting time, higher resolution, wider dynamic range, more efficient compression, less noticeable rolling shutter,...
    I recently got a Nikon D3200, which is at the low end of their prosumer video-capable line. Yet, it has an nice APS-C sensor, shoots clean ISO1600 (though it can go up 8x higher if necessary), records for 19minutes to card, or 29minutes out to live clean HDMI, records 1080i60, 1080p30 or 720p60 (or many other lesser options), allows for adjustable control of all parameters during video shooting mode (except of course framerate & it's minimum shutter speed), DOES NOT OVERHEAT - even after 18+ solid hours of usage! (which I did 2 weeks ago), saves to card as AVC MOV @ 25Mbps. Needless to say, it does the job admirably. And during that recent shoot I pitted it against a prosumer Panny camcorder ($1000 X920, IIRC) run by my colleague, shooting a 2nd angle of the same subject, and the Nikon was HANDS DOWN better in every aspect, except continuous runtime and remote/motorized zoom capability.
    So, I'd have to say that you may want to revisit DSLR video now. Lots has been improved to the point where you may prefer it (or at least tolerate it).

    Scott
    Blah blah blah blah.
    Please explain to the OP how she(?) is going to remove the lens/autofocus noises she will get when the DSLR is struggling to focus between her and her background, or even when she moves AT ALL during the filming.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RfB7z2S5YPM
    Quote Quote  
  16. Why DSLR is not Camera and why Camera is not DSLR.
    http://vimeo.com/49875510
    Quote Quote  
  17. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
    Join Date: Jun 2003
    Location: dFAQ.us/lordsmurf
    Search Comp PM
    I just wish I could have had this kind of "blah" back in the days of analog camcorders! ("...we used to dream of living in a corridor. It would have been a palace to us...")
    Yeah, but we've just traded gripes. While one aspect improved, another got worse. It's just not there yet. I wish it was.

    Of course primes matter on video ... less aberrations = better picture.
    It's not that easy. The small sensor sizes from non-FF cameras already throw away most benefits of a prime. And then aberrations can already be fixed in-camera on many models. Plus primes are not necessarily better than zooms here. It depends on the exact lens. You sadly cannot make such general statements anymore. (You used to! But not now.)

    Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    But you also left out these other "exceptions":
    When shooting through a window, fence, mirror, or other obstruction
    Don't shoot through things. Go around it. AF is the least of your worries here, photo or video.

    When shooting a fast-moving object (sports, wildlife)
    No. Not since the 80s. I still remember the troglodyte dinosaurs that claimed this in the 90s. But AF isn't screwdriver driven anymore. It's AF-S and EOS, etc. The AF is faster than manual. No photojournalist with a salt is shooting manual now. You'd never shoot sports video with a DSLR anyway, as the whole thing would be "jello vision".

    When shooting in low light
    Only if the lens and/or camera is not pro. A D3s and 5D can AF is near pitch black. Even many soccer mom cams are catching up. The soccer mom cams cannot shoot in it anyway, with the toy kit lenses. If it's not 2.8 or better glass, give up the low-light shooting. Not happening, photo or video.

    When following a certain path of focal change for creative effect
    When the shifting object of your "subject of interest" does not match the cam's "focus region of interest"
    I'll give you this one. It's a slow "focal pan", among other terms. It can be a nice effect, used properly. This is more video, not really photo.

    Please explain to the OP how she(?) is going to remove the lens/autofocus noises she will get when the DSLR is struggling to focus between her and her background, or even when she moves AT ALL during the filming.
    Even with hot shoe mics, it can pick up the noise unless the lens is near silent. That means no kit lenses, as most are noisy. It really sucks. The best DSLR right now is on par with a cheap consumer camera, aside from the DOF. Like I said, current DLSR is "blah". If you have a totally off-camera mic, it works. Or if it's muted and other audio is used, it works. But what hech54 said is, sadly, very true still.

    @hech54, I say this not to insult you, but a D90 is almost a dinosaur
    It is. It's the "beta model" for Nikon video, which is worse than Canon video. (Trust me, I hate the Canon is better than Nikon here!) The video from a D90 is almost not usable by modern standards. It's like a 1970s VHS camera!
    Quote Quote  
  18. Member hech54's Avatar
    Join Date: Jul 2001
    Location: Yank in Europe
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by lordsmurf View Post
    @hech54, I say this not to insult you, but a D90 is almost a dinosaur
    It is. It's the "beta model" for Nikon video, which is worse than Canon video. (Trust me, I hate the Canon is better than Nikon here!) The video from a D90 is almost not usable by modern standards. It's like a 1970s VHS camera!
    You of all people should know that I did not buy the D90 because of it's video capabilities. If I recall correctly I didn't even KNOW it shot video until it arrived at my door and glanced through the manual(s).
    I bought it for one reason:

    Quote Quote  
  19. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2001
    Location: Deep in the Heart of Texas
    Search Comp PM
    Page 100 of the manual shows the (few) steps to setting the camera to MANUAL FOCUS mode. Then, there will, of course, be no AF noise. As there isn't with my camera in Manual mode, nor probably yours.
    @hech54, The video you linked to only shows why AF might not be the best option to choose, IMO.

    @pandy, that link shows an unfair, flawed comparison, considering the 5DmkIII was shot using the std. h.264 codec instead of RAW (which it can do with an ML FW upgrade) vs. the BMCC shooting RAW. Though, I would daresay most people here would give their right arm to be "shooting video" as good as the WORST of those shots. If you compare Good-Better-Best, and you say "well, better is missing out on things and is not equal to best", that does not mean it isn't still BETTER on the absolute scale.

    Is the 5DmkIII as good as the much newer BMCC? probably not.
    Is the 5DmkIII worthless as a video/eCinema camera. NO.
    There are always compromises with using any particular equipment platform, but a DSLR system such as the 5DmkIII can do quite a lot nonetheless, give you great "bang for your buck", and are worthy of being used in many video & cinema situations.
    If you disagree, which you are welcome to do, I'll just feel like you might have missed out on a good opportunity.

    I think your heading ought to read, "Why the DSLR is not THE Cinema Camera...". No, you are right, it's just A cinema camera, among many.

    BTW, thanks for that link. It actually cleared up a question I've had WRT the BMCC, in that it also STILL has a rolling shutter, contrary to some advertising stating it had Global shutter. It seems Blackmagic's new URSA is the only model with GS (which also somewhat reduces its dyn range & sensitivity). But, hell! Even the REDs have Rolling Shutter (though quite usable), unless paired with their new GS Motion Mount.

    Scott
    "When will the rhetorical questions end?!" - George Carlin
    Quote Quote  
  20. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2001
    Location: Deep in the Heart of Texas
    Search Comp PM
    @hech54, well, that's a VERY GOOD reason to get that camera!

    Scott
    "When will the rhetorical questions end?!" - George Carlin
    Quote Quote  
  21. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
    Join Date: Jun 2003
    Location: dFAQ.us/lordsmurf
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by hech54 View Post
    You of all people should know that I did not buy the D90 because of it's video capabilities
    I know.
    Quote Quote  
  22. Member hech54's Avatar
    Join Date: Jul 2001
    Location: Yank in Europe
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    Page 100 of the manual shows the (few) steps to setting the camera to MANUAL FOCUS mode. Then, there will, of course, be no AF noise. As there isn't with my camera in Manual mode, nor probably yours.
    @hech54, The video you linked to only shows why AF might not be the best option to choose, IMO.
    Then what is the point? Manual focus on a video camera? Should the OP break out the tape measure so she can hold her head/face in the exact same position/distance from the lens to record every vlog video to ensure she is in focus?
    And....admit it....if you bought a video camera that searched constantly to focus and make a whiney, whirring noise that can be heard the whole time in the final video....you'd send it back for a refund immediately.
    Quote Quote  
  23. aBigMeanie aedipuss's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2005
    Location: 666th portal
    Search Comp PM
    that canon 50mm 1.8 is probably not a good choice if you are ever going to use autofocus while recording video, as it uses a old very noisy motor. both the 50mm 1.4 and the 1.2 use the newer ultrasonic motor(usm) and are a much better choice.
    --
    "a lot of people are better dead" - prisoner KSC2-303
    Quote Quote  
  24. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2001
    Location: Deep in the Heart of Texas
    Search Comp PM
    @lordsmurf,
    But aren't we ALL making generalizations (wait!...I did it again).

    Yes, it very much depends on the lens ($$)

    *************

    There are plenty of situations where one cannot or should not just "go around". That's not really a rebuttal.

    *************

    I agree that sports videographers shouldn't shoot using a DSLR. That's another reason why CCD cams are still important.
    I would probably also agree that most (not ALL) pro photo/video-journalists primarily use AF, but I would guess that they use it sparingly, to set up the shot, then often switch to manual to lock it in (or use the equivalent "Momentary AF").

    *************

    I think we'll have to disagree about low-light AF capability for the present.

    *************

    Focal pan = video. Yup, I thought that's what we were all talking about here, not photo.

    *************

    I'll sort of agree with you about the audio with a major caveat: Anybody who is serious about Audio (as I am), would likely be using double system anyway. I have used some great, pro broadcast cams out there, and their audio STILL isn't equal to mid-range economical audio-centric gear.
    ALL video-centric gear seems to give audio the short shrift these days.

    @hech54, have you never used manual focus before? (It almost sounds like it from that last comment.) Yes, you COULD use a tape measure (or "laser depth meter", ooh ), but much easier would be to manually adjust through the viewfinder (or lcd screen, or confidence moniitor), or use a "momentary AF" to set the focus and leave it set.
    If I HAD bought a crappy enough camera that my AF (when I needed to use it) made such noise, YES, I would take it back. But I don't buy cameras that bad, and the camera I did buy doesn't suffer from that problem, contrary to what you would like to believe.

    Scott

    ...@aedipuss, yes I agree.
    "When will the rhetorical questions end?!" - George Carlin
    Quote Quote  
  25. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
    Join Date: Jun 2003
    Location: dFAQ.us/lordsmurf
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    There are plenty of situations where one cannot or should not just "go around". That's not really a rebuttal..
    Okay. Then where should we start the conversation? Moire, polarizing filters, vignetting, loss of sharpness, loss of contrast. And that's just the one that come immediately to mind. Unless we're talking about dangerous insects trapped in a net, or angry gorillas behind glass (behind bars!), then "go around it" is still the best advice in almost all situations. Otherwise deal with the huge quality hit. Again, AF is the least worry here.

    but I would guess that they use it sparingly, to set up the shot
    Nope. That's what AE/AF locks are for.

    Why do you think pro DSLRs let you program those button locations.

    @hech54, have you never used manual focus before? (It almost sounds like it from that last comment.)
    He's a "weekend warrior" for the most part. Above soccer mom, but below enthusiast (serious hobbyist). So I'd cut him some slack. He does well with the still abilities of his camera. I remember when he first got it, and he takes nice shots of his kid. So don't beat him up too much, especially if this conversation starts going beyond the scope of what he knows and does.

    I think he got the perfect camera for his needs. I think I recommended the D80 at the time, as the little brother to the D200. But the D90 was new at the time. It's been years since we talked about it.

    I like see his work. I think he has a good eye for kiddos!

    Originally Posted by aedipuss View Post
    that canon 50mm 1.8 is probably not a good choice if you are ever going to use autofocus while recording video, as it uses a old very noisy motor. both the 50mm 1.4 and the 1.2 use the newer ultrasonic motor(usm) and are a much better choice.
    For $1k+ for the 1.2, I tend to think simply buying a better camera would be wise. You can grab a used 5D MkII for that, and it'd be tons better than the APC-S mount, even with a kit lens. It's not just a lens that create quality, but the camera as well.
    Quote Quote  
  26. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2001
    Location: Deep in the Heart of Texas
    Search Comp PM
    Actually, I was thinking along the lines of "taking pictures of the POTUS when he's behind protective glass", and "shooting around a corner using a mirror" (helps ALOT when corridors are too small). Of course, in that sit. you'd have the additional problem of refraction unless you used a Front-silvered mirror.

    AF locks! - That's what I was thinking of, just couldn't remember the name. I use it. My cam already has a dedicated button for that but can also program various buttons/sets.

    I wasn't trying to get down on hech54 for that comment, it just seemed to come out of left field.

    Hey, I don't begrudge my APS-C sensor, it's not shabby at all (only 1.5 crop factor). No, it's not full frame, but at least I can still get great lenses in ranges that work with it.
    AFA the lens vs. the cam cost: you've got to have both for it to work right. I'm not sure I'd generalize and say the kit lens+FF sensor would always be better than a $$ lens+APS-C sensor. That's for a shootout to come. and if that were true, then all those years of 2/3" sensors+$10k lenses on Digibetas would have looked like shit, and they didn't.

    Scott
    Last edited by Cornucopia; 23rd May 2014 at 14:10.
    "When will the rhetorical questions end?!" - George Carlin
    Quote Quote  
  27. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
    Join Date: Jun 2003
    Location: dFAQ.us/lordsmurf
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    AFA the lens vs. the cam cost: you've got to have both for it to work right. I'm not sure I'd generalize and say the kit lens+FF sensor would always be better than a $$ lens+APS-C sensor. That's for a shootout to come.
    I think you'd be surprised at the difference the sensor makes for 35mm DSLR, APS-C vs FF (DX vs FX).
    Yes, what I say is actually quite true!

    I don't have any samples online, but look at this: http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/full-frame-advantage.htm
    Forget reading it, look at the images.
    Quote Quote  
  28. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2001
    Location: Deep in the Heart of Texas
    Search Comp PM
    Oh, I don't doubt there's a difference.
    But sensors have also improved quite a bit since 2007 (when that was written). I know for a fact that my 3200 exhibits similar noise at ISO1600 IN LOW LIGHT like the FFCanon did in that DAYLIGHT noise shot.

    Is it worse overall vs. FF? Sure. Is it 1.5 or 2x worse (50-66% the quality)? No. More like 75%. For now, I can live with that. Especially for the price point/budget.

    Scott
    "When will the rhetorical questions end?!" - George Carlin
    Quote Quote  
  29. Video Restorer lordsmurf's Avatar
    Join Date: Jun 2003
    Location: dFAQ.us/lordsmurf
    Search Comp PM
    The sharpness aspect hasn't changed much in recent years. APS-C is still much softer, because of sensor size.

    What HAS changed, however, is the removal of lowpass filters for some FF. Right now, it's not perfect, but that's where sharpness will be headed in the future. Both APS-C sensors and lowpass filtering will, eventually, be a dinosaur of the early digital age.
    Quote Quote  
  30. Member hech54's Avatar
    Join Date: Jul 2001
    Location: Yank in Europe
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by Cornucopia View Post
    @hech54, have you never used manual focus before? (It almost sounds like it from that last comment.) Yes, you COULD use a tape measure (or "laser depth meter", ooh ), but much easier would be to manually adjust through the viewfinder (or lcd screen, or confidence moniitor), or use a "momentary AF" to set the focus and leave it set.
    If I HAD bought a crappy enough camera that my AF (when I needed to use it) made such noise, YES, I would take it back. But I don't buy cameras that bad, and the camera I did buy doesn't suffer from that problem, contrary to what you would like to believe.

    Scott
    I had the Nikon 85mm f2 manual focus I used to LOVE carrying around with me but shortly after I bought it I started to become far sighted (I use reading glasses now) and no amount of diopter adjusting would help. Sold it for an SB-600, then later bought my 35mm 1.8.
    Quote Quote