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  1. Hello Friends,

    I am planning to buy a Samsung TV/Monitor.
    My soul purpose is to play movies using a USB stick, the Monitor does have a USB ports and it does support video playback.
    More specifically I am concern with .mp4 and .mkv
    The manual says Click image for larger version

Name:	SCAP-0199.png
Views:	198
Size:	60.0 KB
ID:	25290

    Now, most of my video files
    with .mkv has
    Video Stream : AVC
    Audio Stream : AC3, DTS/AC-3

    with .mp4 has
    Video Stream : AVC
    Audio Stream : AAC

    I need to know, will I be able to play them on this Monitor (Samsung T22C350MW)

    Waiting for your expert advice and comments.

    Thanks.
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  2. Member
    Join Date: Jun 2012
    Location: USA
    Search Comp PM
    According to that sheet, your mp4s may work and your mkvs won't. But that's assuming everything else is "correct" as well. The only way to know for sure is to try.
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  3. I'm a MEGA Super Moderator Baldrick's Avatar
    Join Date: Aug 2000
    Location: Sweden
    Search Comp PM
    Why wouldn't the mkv work? h264=AVC

    But that doesn't mean that it supports ALL mkv h264/avc videos. There are several different h264 levels for example http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H.264/MPEG-4_AVC#Levels . Many standalone devices might have problem with level 5.1 and higher.
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  4. I also read wiki and it put me into confusion, if H264=AVC. as the manual does not specifically says, that's why thought to ask in this forum.
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  5. I have almost 30-40 .mkv video files and most of them shows has video:AVC - audio:AC3 or video:AVC - DTS/AC-3.
    is there possibility that video stream will show "H264" when viewed using MediaInfo? I also checked video details using KMPlayer and it shows the same details as MediaInfo.
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  6. problem with level 5.1 and higher
    I believe level 4.1 is mean? Anyway the level may often be change by h264 level editor as the video content often can conform to 4.1 shown in Baldricks link.
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  7. Member
    Join Date: Jun 2012
    Location: USA
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by Baldrick View Post
    Why wouldn't the mkv work? h264=AVC
    My error, I thought AVC was a subset. Nevertheless, the odds of OP having SOMETHING incompatible are pretty high.
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  8. This file has bit rate of 5000 kbps whereas format profile : High@L4.1 and the manual says I can play a file with 30Mbps (30720 kbps)
    If I check the level 4.1 on wiki for High Profile has 62500 kbps.
    Name:  SCAP-0200.png
Views: 125
Size:  17.1 KB
    So that means, I can play a video which bit rate is less than 30720 kbps and format profile : High@L4.1
    Correct?

    For me its like doing a Ph.D on audio/video codecs and formats
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  9. Member
    Join Date: Oct 2004
    Location: Freedonia
    Search Comp PM
    Originally Posted by dv2750ee View Post
    So that means, I can play a video which bit rate is less than 30720 kbps and format profile : High@L4.1
    Correct?
    You hope, but what you will find in reality is that TV media players are incredibly fussy about what they will play and if you are a typical downloader, you're likely to find that a lot of your files won't play at all. If you are one of those cheapskate types we get here all the time who place no value at all on their spare team but do care about their money, then you'll be spending a good amount of time trying to fit square pegs into round holes by doing conversions to something the stupid TV media player will accept. We get posts all the time from people like that. If you want as few problems as possible, the best thing you can do is ignore the media player on the TV and just buy a media player like one of the Western Digital ones. Media players will accept and play files without conversion that your TV's media player will choke on.
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  10. Well finally bought HDTV monitor and its playing almost all files I have, didn't find any file which I couldn't.

    Thanks guys for helping me to understand basics.
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  11. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
    Join Date: Oct 2001
    Location: Deep in the Heart of Texas
    Search Comp PM
    This is meant for the OP, as well as future on-lookers...

    AFA the containers, you're covered with MP4 & MKV (assuming they were muxed correctly).

    AFA the codecs, you're covered with AVC/h.264 (yes, they are the same thing).
    What's questionable is the Level + Profile. AVC is a codec FAMILY of encoders, not just a single encoder type. You need to also match the Level + Profile (or be just below) with your target device. e.g. If requirement is HP@L4.1 you're ok with L4.1 or L4.0 or L3.0, etc, but not L5.0 or L5.1. What videobruger suggested is a cheat of faking the header with a lower Level setting designator. Might work, might not (depending on which features in the Level are actually being used).

    You also mention "DTS/AC-3" as the audio codec. That doesn't exist: it is either DTS family or AC-3 family (with standard/core files in the HD versions). Those two types are competitors, they're never going to be combined. So, either you or the app you are using is misreading the info (or the info in the file is wrong). What are you using? MediaInfo?

    Lastly, bitrate is a concern, but that has more to do with access buffering, and most downloaded files are MUCH less than your 30Mbps limit, I have found. So that shouldn't be too much of a problem. But don't assume that because a certain level has a max bitrate, while your bitrate is less than that with a higher profile/level, that yours would work. It wouldn't! Level designation has to do not only with bitrate ranges but which encoding FEATURES are engaged.

    Scott
    "When will the rhetorical questions end?!" - George Carlin
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  12. I own a Samsung Plasma. It's a couple of years old. It's media player will play pretty much everything I ask it to. All the common formats, anyway.
    The only gripe is it doesn't support anamorphic video. It displays everything as though it has square pixels.

    My TV's manual specifies 25Mbps rather than 30Mbps (maybe that's something to do with living in PAL-land?). Even so, it seems more like an average than a maximum bitrate. I tested my TV's media player with a sample which had peaks at 100Mbps (it stuttered) and then again after re-encoding it while applying different restrictions. --vbv-bufsize 58000 --vbv-maxrate 58000 allowed it to play the encoded video (1080p, High Profile, level 4.1). It's not likely you'll be playing much video with a bitrate that's too high for the TV's media player.
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