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  1. Member gastrof's Avatar
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    I had a widescreen movie, recorded from TV, that my DVD recorder couldn't "stamp" as 16x9. (It lacks that ability.)

    It didn't record as letterbox, there were no black bars. It simply took all the widescreen material, burned it to the disc, but left it "thinking" it was a 4x3 recording. (On an older TV, the people look tall and thin. The whole widescreen picture is squeezed into the 4x3 frame.)

    I used VLC's recorder to store the DVD as an .mpg file on my computer's hard drive, and someone suggested using DVDPatcher to change its coding to 16x9 (rather than using AviDemux to re-encode the whole thing to get it into 16X9).

    The file size remained the same after Patcher changed it to 16x9, but when I went to use AVStoDVD to reburn it to a disc, menu and all, the video file itself ended up being reported as being over 6gb.

    The original file had been less than 4. It still shows on my hard drive as the same size it was. AVStoDVD, however, insists the thing is over 6 gigs, and that it won't fit on the DVD.

    Does that make any sense to anyone, and is there a way around it?

    Thanks.
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    Originally Posted by gastrof View Post
    I had a widescreen movie, recorded from TV, that my DVD recorder couldn't "stamp" as 16x9. (It lacks that ability.)

    It didn't record as letterbox, there were no black bars. It simply took all the widescreen material, burned it to the disc, but left it "thinking" it was a 4x3 recording. (On an older TV, the people look tall and thin. The whole widescreen picture is squeezed into the 4x3 frame.)

    I used VLC's recorder to store the DVD as an .mpg file on my computer's hard drive, and someone suggested using DVDPatcher to change its coding to 16x9 (rather than using AviDemux to re-encode the whole thing to get it into 16X9).

    The file size remained the same after Patcher changed it to 16x9, but when I went to use AVStoDVD to reburn it to a disc, menu and all, the video file itself ended up being reported as being over 6gb.

    The original file had been less than 4. It still shows on my hard drive as the same size it was. AVStoDVD, however, insists the thing is over 6 gigs, and that it won't fit on the DVD.

    Does that make any sense to anyone, and is there a way around it?

    Thanks.
    DVDPatcher has nothing to do with your problem. You created a non-DVD-compliant version of your already DVD-compliant recording by messing around with VLC. AVStoDVD automatically re-encoded it again for DVD compliancy because it is a DVD converter. That, plus the settings you used for AVStoDVD are responsible for the larger file size.

    There has to be a better way to do whatever you were attempting to do by using VLC. Maybe AVStoDVD can do whatever that was. ...and BTW AVStoDVD can correct the aspect ratio on its own (without any re-encoding of video that is already DVD compliant) so you do not need to use DVDPatcher if you plan to use AVStoDVD.
    Last edited by usually_quiet; 11th May 2014 at 22:00. Reason: left out a word
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  3. Member
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    Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post

    There has to be a better way to do whatever you were attempting to do by using VLC. Maybe AVStoDVD can do whatever that was. ...and BTW AVStoDVD can ccorrect the aspect ratio on its own (without any re-encoding of video that is already DVD compliant) so you do not need to use DVDPatcher if plan to use AVStoDVD.
    Yes, in AVStoDVD right click the title on the main screen
    edit source title info/video display aspect ratio

    Try setting it to 1.778
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  4. Member gastrof's Avatar
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    The only source title is the .mpg file that was created by the VLC player.

    There was no "messing around", since that's the only way the recording could end up in one piece on the hard drive.

    That .mpg file will work with AVStoDVD, and does not grow to over 6gb,, but it's still encoded as 4x3.

    After DVDPatcher changed the .mpg file to 16x9, THAT was when the problem started. The computer shows the file size of the .mpg remained exactly the same, but for some reason AVStoDVD thinks the file is over 6gigs now.

    Davexnet-
    Are you saying the .mpg file, with its 4x3 coding, can be turned into 16x9 by AVStoDVD itself? I didn't need to change it with DVDPatcher in the first place?
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    Originally Posted by gastrof View Post

    Davexnet-
    Are you saying the .mpg file, with its 4x3 coding, can be turned into 16x9 by AVStoDVD itself? I didn't need to change it with DVDPatcher in the first place?
    Cut off a 10 second piece and post it here. You''ll soon get a proper answer.
    Hard to see exactly what it needs without seeing it.
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  6. Member
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    Originally Posted by gastrof View Post
    The only source title is the .mpg file that was created by the VLC player.

    There was no "messing around", since that's the only way the recording could end up in one piece on the hard drive.

    That .mpg file will work with AVStoDVD, and does not grow to over 6gb,, but it's still encoded as 4x3.

    After DVDPatcher changed the .mpg file to 16x9, THAT was when the problem started. The computer shows the file size of the .mpg remained exactly the same, but for some reason AVStoDVD thinks the file is over 6gigs now.

    Davexnet-
    Are you saying the .mpg file, with its 4x3 coding, can be turned into 16x9 by AVStoDVD itself? I didn't need to change it with DVDPatcher in the first place?
    VLC includes a screen recording function, and I assumed that you had used it, when you wrote "I used VLC's recorder to store the DVD as an .mpg file on my computer's hard drive". Now, if you said you had used VLC's converter, maybe I would have understood what you were actually doing with VLC. However, VLC's converter can re-encode video and audio if someone is not careful, so I would recommend using the free version of VOB2MPG instead.

    ...and yes, AVStoDVD can patch your 4:3 video to use a 16:9 aspect ratio. davexnet already told you what to do.
    Last edited by usually_quiet; 12th May 2014 at 11:00.
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  7. Member gastrof's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by usually_quiet View Post
    Originally Posted by gastrof View Post
    The only source title is the .mpg file that was created by the VLC player.

    There was no "messing around", since that's the only way the recording could end up in one piece on the hard drive.

    That .mpg file will work with AVStoDVD, and does not grow to over 6gb,, but it's still encoded as 4x3.

    After DVDPatcher changed the .mpg file to 16x9, THAT was when the problem started. The computer shows the file size of the .mpg remained exactly the same, but for some reason AVStoDVD thinks the file is over 6gigs now.

    Davexnet-
    Are you saying the .mpg file, with its 4x3 coding, can be turned into 16x9 by AVStoDVD itself? I didn't need to change it with DVDPatcher in the first place?
    VLC includes a screen recording function, and I assumed that you had used it, when you wrote "I used VLC's recorder to store the DVD as an .mpg file on my computer's hard drive". Now, if you said you had used VLC's converter, maybe I would have understood what you were actually doing with VLC. However, VLC's converter can re-encode video and audio if someone is not careful, so I would recommend using the free version of VOB2MPG instead.

    ...and yes, AVStoDVD can patch your 4:3 video to use a 16:9 aspect ratio. davexnet already told you what to do.

    I did use VLC's recorder (red button), and if it has a converter I don't know where it is.

    If you store a DVD using its recorder, it stores the video as an .mpg. We know that .mpg files are DVD compliant, whether coded for 4x3 or 16x9.

    The weird thing about this is that DVDPatcher (and I've said this more than once) made the resulting .mpg into a 16x9 recording with an identical file size, but it was AVStoDVD that said it was over 6 gigs (when the computer showed it as less than 4).

    Using DVDPatcher to make a 4x3 recording into a 16x9 one shouldn't have made it no longer DVD compliant, as was suggested.

    The original .mpg file doesn't exist any more, since it was converted to 16x9 already, but I'm currently re-creating it by re-recording it to the hard drive, once again using VLC. This will allow me to test it out with AVStoDVD and see if the results end up as 16x9, and possibly post a small portion here.

    I wonder which to post, tho'? The 4x3 coded "squashed" original, or the "patched to 16x9" version??
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    If everything turns out fine, no need to post anything.
    Otherwise, post the source and the AVStoDVD log file.
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  9. Originally Posted by gastrof View Post
    I'm currently re-creating it by re-recording it to the hard drive, once again using VLC.
    Why? You can't just put the DVD onto the hard drive?
    Last edited by manono; 13th May 2014 at 03:25.
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    Originally Posted by gastrof View Post
    I did use VLC's recorder (red button), and if it has a converter I don't know where it is.

    If you store a DVD using its recorder, it stores the video as an .mpg. We know that .mpg files are DVD compliant, whether coded for 4x3 or 16x9.

    The weird thing about this is that DVDPatcher (and I've said this more than once) made the resulting .mpg into a 16x9 recording with an identical file size, but it was AVStoDVD that said it was over 6 gigs (when the computer showed it as less than 4).

    Using DVDPatcher to make a 4x3 recording into a 16x9 one shouldn't have made it no longer DVD compliant, as was suggested.

    The original .mpg file doesn't exist any more, since it was converted to 16x9 already, but I'm currently re-creating it by re-recording it to the hard drive, once again using VLC. This will allow me to test it out with AVStoDVD and see if the results end up as 16x9, and possibly post a small portion here.
    I had never used a version of VLC that displayed the red record button by default and didn't know it existed. ...which is why I thought you were recording the screen with VLC instead, which would re-encode. Since the red record button allows capturing the A/V streams from the DVD being played in an .mpg file without re-encoding, you were indeed merely saving the original audio and video in a different container as you said. I just tried using VLC's Save/Convert function and it didn't work for creating an .mpg file, so I guess you can ignore that suggestion.

    The downside of using the red record button to create a .mpg file is that the file is created in real time. The free version of VOB2MPG repackages the audio and video from VOB files into .mpg files much more quickly. If you haven't tried the free version VOB2MPG before, it might be worthwhile to find out if it can save you some time. I guess it is possible that VOB2MPG doesn't work for everyone, but VOB2MPG's IFO mode has always worked well for me on my Windows 7 PCs using DVD video discs from my DVD recorder.
    Last edited by usually_quiet; 13th May 2014 at 01:28.
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  11. Member Cornucopia's Avatar
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    After DVDPatcher changed the .mpg file to 16x9, THAT was when the problem started. The computer shows the file size of the .mpg remained exactly the same, but for some reason AVStoDVD thinks the file is over 6gigs now.
    No, that was when you first NOTICED it being a problem. Big difference.

    I agree with manono: why don't you take the simplest route (the one least prone to problems) and Rip the VOB from your DVD disc (the one your DVD-recorder recorded). For that, I'd use DVDDecryptor (not for the decryption, but for the IFO->VOB->MPG extracting tools). Then, use DVDpatcher on it (the MPG). Run a MediaInfo pass on both your Source (on-disc) VOB and your patched MPG. Only difference should be the DAR.

    Then, if you want a playable, authored DVD from it, just use Muxman, etc. Or even AVS2DVD as long as you are only AUTHORING and not Re-Encoding.

    Scott
    "When will the rhetorical questions end?!" - George Carlin
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  12. Member
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    i think there iis some confusion
    I think AVS2dvd is reporting the conversion TO DVD will be over 6gb
    you need to reduce the the Encode "bitrate" to a lower number
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